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Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and Deferred Enforced Departure (DED)

This webpage contains tools for TPS and DED holders, practitioners, advocates, media, the general public and more. Check back frequently for updates and new resources!

On this page:

About TPS and DED |  TPS and DED Key Dates and Information | Quick Updates on TPS and DED Decisions | Upcoming TPS Decision Dates | TPS Litigation Updates | Practitioner Resources | Federal Register Notice Analysis |Advocacy Tools | Advocacy Reports and Backgrounders | Outreach to the Administration | Media Resources | Parish Resources

 

Breaking news: On May 10 DHS issued its first Federal Register Notice announcing its plan to comply with the Bhattari v. Nielsen court order, which temporarily halts the termination of TPS for Nepal and Honduras. Additional information will be posted on this page and distributed through CLINIC’s Agency Updates listserv as it becomes available. Sign up for CLINIC listservs here and check back on this page often.

 

Looking for immigration legal help, guidance on your rights, or preparing for the end of status? Click here for resources to get started.

 

About TPS and DED


Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, is a life-saving immigration status that allows foreign nationals to remain in the U.S. if during the time they were in the U.S. something catastrophic happened in their country of origin preventing their safe return – for example war, famine, natural disaster, or epidemic. TPS allows people to work legally and be protected from deportation.

Deferred Enforced Departure, or DED, like TPS, allows foreign nationals to be protected from deportation and have the opportunity to work. DED is granted through the President’s foreign relations power.

 

If you are a TPS recipient who needs legal assistance, please contact one of our affiliates using our directory.

 

Who are TPS holders?

Country

Population[1]

Expiration Date

Decision Date[2]

Original Designation

Redesignations (if any)

Type of TPS Designation (except for Liberia)

 

South Sudan

84

Nov. 2, 2020

Sept. 3, 2020

Nov. 3, 2011

Sept. 2, 2014 and Jan. 25, 2016

(A) ongoing armed conflict AND

(C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

 

Syria

 

 

7,000

 

Sept. 30, 2019

Aug. 1, 2019

Mar. 29, 2012

June 17, 2013; January 5, 2015; and Aug. 1, 2016

(A) ongoing armed conflict AND

(C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Yemen 1,250 March 3, 2020 Jan. 3, 2020 Sept. 3, 2015 Jan. 4, 2017
(A) ongoing armed conflict AND
 
(C) extraordinary and temporary conditions
Somalia 500 March 17, 2020 Jan 17, 2020 Sept. 16, 1991 Sept. 4, 2001 and Sept.18, 2012

(A) ongoing armed conflict AND

(C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Sudan

1,040

Autoextension:

Jan. 2, 2020*

N/A

Nov. 4, 1997

Nov. 9, 1999; Nov. 2, 2004; and May 3, 2013

(A) ongoing armed conflict AND

(C) extraordinary and temporary conditions

Nicaragua

2,550

Autoextension:

Jan. 2, 2020*

N/A

Jan. 5, 1999

N/A

(B) environmental disaster and inability, temporarily, to accept returns

Liberia - DED

745 – 4,000

Termination effective March 30, 2020

N/A

TPS: 1991-1999

DED: 1999-2002

 

TPS: 2002-2007

DED: 2007-present

TPS: 2014-2017

Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) must have resided in US since Oct. 2002
Nepal 8,950 Autoextension March 24, 2020* N/A June 24, 2015 N/A (B) earthquake and inability, temporarily, to accept returns

Haiti

46,000

Autoextension:

Jan. 2, 2020*

N/A

Jan. 21, 2010

July 23, 2011

(C) extraordinary and temporary conditions
El Salvador 195,000

Autoextension:

Jan. 2, 2020*

N/A Mar. 9, 2001 N/A

(B) environmental disaster and inability, temporarily, to accept returns

 

Honduras 57,000 Termination on hold, autoextension date forthcoming* N/A Jan. 5, 1999 N/A (B) environmental disaster and inability, temporarily, to accept returns

* Terminations of TPS for these countries are temporarily on hold by Court orders under Ramos v. Nielsen and Bhattarai v. Nielsen.


[1]These figures represent the population of expected re-registrants and come from Jill H. Wilson, Temporary Protected Status: Overview and Current Issues, Congressional Research Service, RS20844, Jan. 17, 2018, available at https://fas.org/sgp/crs/homesec/RS20844.pdf. This CRS report (p. 5) also includes higher figures from USCIS of individuals who had TPS but have switched to another status, left the US, died, or for other reasons did not maintain the status. The DED 745 number is based on work authorization; actual beneficiaries (including those who do not apply for work authorization) may be much higher based on various estimates.
[2]INA 244(b)(3) requires that DHS make a decision 60 days prior to the expiration date and “timely” publish such determination in the Federal Register. DED has no advance notice requirement.

 

Quick Updates on TPS and DED Decisions


Sudan: TPS for Sudan has been automatically extended through Jan. 2, 2020 through the Ramos v. Nielsen lawsuit.

Nicaragua: TPS for Nicaragua has been automatically extended through Jan. 2, 2020 through the Ramos v. Nielsen lawsuit.

Liberia DED: Liberia DED received a 12-month termination in March 2018 . The administration postponed the termination date for another year in March 2019. The last day of DED for Liberia will be March 30, 2020.

Nepal: TPS for Nepal has been automatically extended through March 24, 2020 through the Bhattarai v. Nielsen lawsuit.

Haiti: TPS for Haiti has been automatically extended through Jan. 2, 2020 through the Ramos v. Nielsen lawsuit.

El Salvador: TPS for El Salvador has been automatically extended through Jan. 2, 2020 through the Ramos v. Nielsen lawsuit.

Honduras: The termination of TPS for Honduras is under preliminary injunction in the Bhattarai v. Nielsen lawsuit. DHS is expected to provide more information regarding Honduran TPS in Nov. 2019, approximately 45 days before Jan. 5, 2020, when TPS for Honduras had been set to terminate (and when current Honduran TPS documents will expire).

South Sudan: TPS for South Sudan received an 18-month extension on March 3, 2019. The next decision date for TPS for South Sudan will be September 3, 2020. 

Syria: Syria received an  18-month extension in January 2018 . The next decision date for TPS for Syria will be Aug. 1, 2019.

Yemen: Yemen received an  18-month extension in July 2018 . The next decision date for TPS for Yemen will be Jan. 3, 2020.

Somalia: Somalia received an  18-month extension in July 2018 . The next decision date for TPS for Somalia will be Jan. 17, 2020.

 

Upcoming TPS decision dates:


August 1, 2019: Syria

Jan. 3, 2020: Yemen

Jan. 17, 2020: Somalia

Sept. 3, 2020: South Sudan

 


TPS Litigation Updates

Nepali TPS holders can use this quick guide for more information about how to prove an automatic extension of TPS and work authorization under the Bhattarai v. Nielsen case.

Updated date: 06/14/2019

On March 12, 2019 a court order was issued in the Bhattarai v. Nielsen case temporarily halting the Department of Homeland Security’s, or DHS, termination of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Nepal and Honduras. The Bhattarai case is linked to the Ramos v. Nielsen case, which covers Sudan, Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Haiti, and is currently under preliminary injunction. DHS published the first steps of its plan for compliance with the Bhattarai injunction in the Federal Register on May 10, 2019. This notice automatically extends TPS and related documents for eligible Nepali TPS holders.

Updated date: 05/14/2019

Recorded on March 22, 2019

This webinar reviewed recent developments that affect TPS clients, with a focus on the implementation of the preliminary injunction in Ramos v. Nielsen and tips for practitioners.

Updated date: 03/28/2019

Beneficiaries and advocates are pushing back against the administration’s attempts to terminate Temporary Protected Status for multiple countries. Here is a look at the lawsuit currently filed.

Updated date: 04/23/2019

Sudanese, Nicaraguan, Haitian and Salvadoran TPS holders can use this quick guide for more information about how to prove an automatic extension of TPS and work authorization under the Ramos v. Nielsen case.

Updated date: 03/18/2019

On March 12, 2019 a federal district court in California temporarily stayed the termination of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Nepal and Honduras in the Bhattarai v. Nielsen case. Read CLINIC's analysis to learn more about what this order means, what happens next, and what steps Nepali and Honduran TPS holders and legal practitioners should take now.

Updated date: 03/14/2019

Signed Court order outlining the steps that DHS will take to temporarily continue TPS for Nepal and Honduras

Updated date: 03/13/2019

On March 1, the Department of Homeland Security, or DHS, published a Federal Register Notice containing important information about the automatic extension of TPS and work authorization for certain Sudanese, Nicaraguan, Haitian and Salvadoran TPS holders due to a court order in the Ramos v. Nielsen case.

Updated date: 03/06/2019

This article contains an overview of how Sudanese and Nicaraguan TPS holders can show they have an automatic extensions of their TPS and work authorization through April 2, 2019 to employers, Motor Vehicle Departments, etc., under the Ramos v. Nielsen case.

Updated date: 03/01/2019

On Oct. 3, 2018, a preliminary injunction was issued in the Ramos v. Nielsen case, temporarily halting the Department of Homeland Security’s, or DHS, termination of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti and El Salvador.

Updated date: 10/31/2018

 


TPS/DED Holder, Advocate and Practitioner Resources

USCIS mistakenly rejected approximately 155 Liberian DED employment authorization applications (Form I-765) filed prior to May 8, 2019. A computer coding error at the Chicago Lockbox caused the cases to be rejected during initial screening. As a result, USCIS issued rejection notices erroneously stating that the “country...is not currently eligible for DED.”

Updated date: 05/16/2019

This chart contains key information and dates for TPS countries including most recent decision, re-registration period, EAD automatic extension and more.

Updated date: 05/16/2019

This practice advisory, written for legal service providers, answers common questions about filing late TPS re-registration applications, including what might constitute a “good cause” reason for filing late, what to include in the application, and the potential risks of applying late. It also includes specific considerations for TPS beneficiaries from Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti and El Salvador based on DHS compliance with the injunction in the Ramos v. Nielsen case.

Updated date: 04/03/2019

Two recent developments will extend protections for holders of Temporary Protected Status from Sudan, Nicaragua, Haiti, El Salvador, Nepal and Honduras, despite decisions by the Department of Homeland Security to terminate TPS designations for each of these countries.

Updated date: 04/02/2019

This guide recommends steps DED holders can take now to prepare their families for after the program ends.

Updated date: 03/20/2019

Quick facts about what the recent TPS terminations mean for those who hold this immigration status.

Updated date: 08/06/2018

This tool will help immigrant legal service providers and community-based organizations plan to effectively and efficiently respond to the decisions on TPS for certain nationalities.

Updated date: 06/11/2018

When TPS decisions are made, be it termination or extension, immigrants are required to re-register and reapply for employment authorization. Here is the basic process for re-registering TPS holders.

Updated date: 02/15/2018

On January 8, 2018, DHS announced that TPS for El Salvador will terminate on September 9, 2019. Join CLINIC for a discussion on how this and other recent TPS decisions will impact your clients. We will review the TPS decisions for nationals of El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras and Nicaragua, including critical dates for re-registration and how to maintain employment authorization. We will also address screening TPS recipients for other forms of relief, including adjustment of status eligibility; offer community education materials; and provide advocacy updates.

Updated date: 01/16/2018

Are your TPS clients eligible for permanent relief through family-based immigration?

Over the coming months DHS will continue to review TPS designations for several countries.

In this webinar we will explore options to help TPS recipients who are immediate relatives adjust status. We will review adjustment of status under INA sections 245(a) and 245(i) and adjustment for TPS holders residing in the 6th and 9th Circuits.

Updated date: 12/06/2017

A collection of briefings held to discuss the recent terminations and extensions of TPS and what that means for holders, our affiliates and the community as a whole.

Updated date: 11/30/2017

Do you have clients with Temporary Protected Status who reside in the jurisdiction of either the Sixth or Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals? These frequently asked questions explain how current USCIS policy permits individuals who entered the United States without inspection, but subsequently received TPS, adjust to lawful permanent resident status.  

Updated date: 11/15/2017

This screening tool will help legal representatives determine whether a TPS recipient may be eligible to adjust to lawful permanent resident status in the United States.

Updated date: 11/10/2017

 


Federal Register Notice Analysis

The Federal Register Notice for the 18-month extension of TPS for South Sudan (from May 3, 2019 to Nov. 2, 2020) was published April 5, 2019. CLINIC’s summary contains key information for TPS holders regarding how to re-register and maintain work authorization through the designation period.

Updated date: 04/05/2019

A Federal Register Notice automatically extending Liberian DED holder work authorization through Sept. 27, 2019, and containing information about how Liberian DED holders can maintain work authorization through the entire year until March 30, 2020, was published April 3, 2019.

Updated date: 04/03/2019

The Federal Register Notice for the 18-month extension of TPS for Somalia (from Sept. 18, 2018, to March 17, 2020) was published Aug. 27, 2018. CLINIC’s summary contains key information for TPS holders regarding how to re-register and maintain work authorization through the designation period.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

The Federal Register Notice for the 18-month extension of TPS for Yemen (from Sept. 4, 2018 to March 3, 2020) was published Aug. 14, 2018. CLINIC’s summary contains key information for TPS holders regarding how to re-register and maintain work authorization through the designation period.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

The Federal Register Notice for the 18-month termination of TPS for Honduras (from July 5, 2018 to Jan. 5, 2020) was published today, June 5, 2018.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

The Federal Register Notice for the 12-month termination of TPS for Nepal (from June 24, 2018 to June 24, 2019) was published on Tuesday, May 22, 2018.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

The Federal Register Notice for Syria TPS was published on March 5, 2018. Read CLINIC’s analysis for guidance on the re-registration process and maintaining work authorization.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

Yesterday’s Federal Register Notice on Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Haiti contained an error affecting Haitian TPS holders who have pending applications with USCIS.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

Federal Register Notices have been published for Haiti and El Salvador.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

Federal Register Notices have been published for Honduras and Nicaragua.

Updated date: 09/30/2018

 


Advocacy Tools

This collection of stories illustrates why TPS for Venezuela must be designated now. Use for outreach to lawmakers and raising awareness in your networks and community. 

Updated date: 07/16/2019

CLINIC’s policy brief examines extreme processing delays at USCIS under the Trump administration and the particular consequences to TPS holders and their families. The brief questions USCIS’ methods in dealing with the processing delays for TPS holders, pointing out that USCIS elected an unusual, inefficient, and error-prone process. The brief includes recommendations for oversight and holding the administration accountable.

Updated date: 06/28/2019

CLINIC’s policy brief documents the Trump administration’s failure to redesignate Temporary Protected Status for any country, most notably for three war-torn countries—Yemen, Syria and South Sudan—which had received redes­ignations and 18-month extensions in every previous TPS decision. The failure to redesignate raises serious legal questions as to whether the administration employed the proper legal analysis and procedure in these and any of its TPS decisions.

Updated date: 04/30/2019

This backgrounder explains the history of TPS for Syria and the administration’s failure to redesignate TPS for Syria, a break with the past practice of granting the maximum protection possible to protect Syrians in the U.S. The backgrounder includes concrete steps for Members of Congress to engage in oversight of this unprecedented decision.

Updated date: 07/27/2018

This resource contains a collection of Nepali TPS holder stories and illustrates the human impact of terminating TPS.

Updated date: 10/03/2018

Use this backgrounder to help educate the lawmakers, state and local officials, the media and others about Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Enforced Departure. This backgrounder shows the consequences that the administration’s decisions to terminate TPS and DED have on families, our economy and national security interests.

Updated date: 01/08/2019

This resource contains a collection of TPS holder stories and illustrates the human impact of terminating TPS.

Updated date: 10/03/2018

 


Advocacy Reports and Backgrounders

This report documents the critical, ongoing need for TPS for Syria.

Updated date: 07/17/2019

This report documents the clear and urgent need for Venezuela to be designated for Temporary Protected Status, or TPS. The report contains an overview of the law, current country conditions, and why TPS is both a necessary humanitarian response to the crisis in Venezuela and in the U.S. national interest.

Updated date: 04/30/2019

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for South Sudan will expire on May 2, 2019 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend and/or redesignate or terminate TPS for South Sudan by March 3, 2019.

Updated date: 02/07/2019

This comprehensive backgrounder contains an overview of what TPS is, how it works, who TPS holders are, and an overview of the current administration’s TPS terminations and other related decisions and actions. This backgrounder is useful for reporters, legislators, advocates, and others looking to better understand the mechanics of TPS and the current state of play.

Updated date: 01/07/2019

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Somalia will expire on Sept. 17, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend and/or redesignate or terminate TPS for Somalia by July 19, 2018.

Updated date: 06/29/2018

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Yemen will expire on Sept. 3, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend and/or redesignate or terminate TPS for Yemen by July 5, 2018.

Updated date: 06/18/2019

This report documents the clear and acute need for an extension of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Nepal for at least another 18 months.

 

Updated date: 04/02/2018
The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for approximately 9,000 Nepali TPS holders will expire on June 24, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend, terminate or redesignate TPS for Nepal by April 25, 2018.
 
Updated date: 03/29/2018

This report documents the critical need for the United States to continue to extend Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Haiti until the country sufficiently recovers from a series of deadly natural disasters and is able to safely reabsorb TPS holders. Without TPS, the progress Haiti has made in recovery will be, at the least, seriously compromised.

Updated date: 03/28/2018
Image of Document

The current 6-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for nearly 60,000 Hondurans will expire on July 5, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS Secretary must decide whether to extend, terminate or redesignate TPS for Honduras by May 4, 2018.

Updated date: 02/15/2018

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans will expire on March 9, 2018 unless extended by the Department of Homeland Security Secretary. By statute, the DHS Secretary must decide whether conditions warrant extension of the deadline by Jan. 8, 2018.

Updated date: 06/13/2018
Image of Document

The current six-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for approximately 50,000 Haitians will expire on Jan. 22, 2018unless extended by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. By law, the secretary must decide by Nov. 23, 2017 whether conditions warrant extending TPS.

Updated date: 03/05/2018

 

Outreach to the Administration

On  July 11, 2019, CLINIC delivered a letter signed by 200 faith leaders and faith-based organizations from across traditions urging the administration to grant an 18-month extension and to redesignate TPS for Syria, warranted under the law due to ongoing armed conflict and humanitarian emergency in the country.

Updated date: 07/11/2019

In April 2019, CLINIC sent a letter to USCIS with recommendations regarding ongoing TPS implementation issues and Ramos v. Nielsen. On May 24, 2019, CLINIC received this response.

Updated date: 05/24/2019

CLINIC submitted a letter to USCIS Director Cissna on May 16, 2019 with recommendations to address and correct its erroneous rejection of Forms I-765 filed by Liberian DED holders. In summary, CLINIC recommends that USCIS should: automatically extend all Liberian DED holders EADs for the 12-month DED period; conduct outreach to ensure the Liberian community has accurate information; and investigate the root causes of the error, make its findings available to the public, and take corrective action to avoid replication.   

Updated date: 05/16/2019

CLINIC sent a letter to USCIS Director Cissna on April 26, 2019, regarding recommendations to mitigate harm TPS holders are experiencing due to systemic issues at USCIS as well as steps USCIS should take to ensure that TPS holders under the Ramos v. Nielsen preliminary injunction are able to maintain their TPS benefits.

Updated date: 04/29/2019

In March 2019, more than 215 national, state, and local organizations sent a letter to DHS requesting an immediate designation of TPS for Venezuela. In April 2019, DHS sent this response.

Updated date: 04/18/2019

On April 2, 2019, CLINIC sent a letter to DHS Secretary Nielsen and USCIS Director Cissna registering concerns with ongoing Federal Register Notice delays for Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, and the resulting consequence to TPS holders and their families. The letter also included recommendations for the forthcoming Federal Register Notice for the 12-month postponement of the termination of Deferred Enforced Departure for Liberia. Due to extreme work authorization processing delays at USCIS, CLINIC recommended USCIS automatically extend work authorization for DED holders for the entire year.

Updated date: 04/05/2019

More than 215 national, state, and local organizations in the areas of immigration, civil rights, human rights, labor, faith, and education called on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to immediately designate Venezuela for Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

Updated date: 03/13/2019

On Feb. 12, 2019, CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by more than 300 faith leaders and faith-based organizations from across traditions urging the administration to grant an 18-month extension and to redesignate TPS for South Sudan, demanded by ongoing armed conflict and humanitarian crises in the country.

Updated date: 02/15/2019

Letter from 70 law professors and scholars to USCIS and DHS regarding USCIS' new policy of issuing physical mailed extensions for employment authorization instead of Federal Register Notices.

Updated date: 12/03/2018

Letter from 115+ national, state, and local organizations demanding that Congress support a DHS IG investigation on decisions related to TPS, including the investigation of various administrative irregularities.

Updated date: 12/03/2018

On Oct. 26, 2018, CLINIC sent a letter to USCIS Director Cissna expressing concern and requesting more information and engagement on TPS processing delays which left tens of thousands of TPS holders without valid work authorization documents just days before their work authorization was to expire.

Updated date: 11/21/2018

Over 300 national, state, and local immigrant, religious, labor, and civil rights organizations sent a letter to Kristjen Nielsen, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, asking her to grant Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Guatemala in light of recent environmental disasters. TPS provides the ability to work and protection from deportation for foreign nationals who cannot be safely returned to their home countries due to extraordinary and temporary conditions, such as an environmental disaster.

Updated date: 07/24/2018

On July 11, 2018, CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by over 100 faith leaders and faith-based organizations from across traditions urging the administration to grant an 18-month extension and to redesignate TPS for Somalia, demanded by Somalia’s humanitarian crisis and ongoing violent conflict.

Updated date: 11/28/2018

On June 20, 2018, CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by over 650 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions urging the administration to grant an 18 month extension and to redesignate TPS for Yemen, demanded by Yemen’s ongoing war and catastrophic humanitarian crisis.

Updated date: 06/21/2018

CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by 640 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions calling on the administration to extend and redesignate TPS for Honduras for at least another 18 months.

Updated date: 05/03/2018

CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by 275 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions calling on the administration to extend Temporary Protected Status for Nepal for at least another 18 months.

Updated date: 04/02/2018

Over 600 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions delivered a letter to the White House on March 22, 2018 urging the president to extend Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) for Liberia for at least another 18 months.

Updated date: 04/30/2018

On Jan. 23, 2018, Church World Service and CLINIC delivered a letter to the administration signed by nearly 300 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions in support of Syrian TPS holders. The letter calls on Secretary Nielsen to extend TPS for Syria for 18 months and to redesignate in order to protect more Syrians in need.

Updated date: 05/15/2019

CLINIC’s Executive Director Jeanne Atkinson joined the USCCB Committee on Migration, Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA), and Scalabrini International Migration Network (SIMN) in sending a letter to Secretary of Homeland Security, Kirstjen Nielsen, urging an 18-month extension of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for El Salvador

Updated date: 01/08/2018

The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. and Church World Service delivered a letter to Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, urging the agency to extend Temporary Protected Status for nearly 200,000 Salvadoran TPS holders for at least another 18 months.

Updated date: 01/08/2018

On Dec. 4, CLINIC joined more than 130 other faith, non-profit, academic, and other organizations from across the country in a letter urging DHS and USCIS to immediately publish the official TPS notices for Honduras, Nicaragua, and Haiti.

Updated date: 12/06/2017

On Oct. 27, CLINIC joined 120 other faith, non-profit, academic and other organizations from across the country in a letter urging DHS to reconsider the recent termination of Temporary Protected Status for Sudan.

Updated date: 11/03/2017

CLINIC’s Executive Director Jeanne Atkinson joined the leaders of other major Catholic agencies that work to support immigrants and refugees have urged the head of the Department of Homeland Security to extend Temporary Protected Status for Honduras and El Salvador.

Updated date: 11/21/2017

The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by nearly 700 American faith leaders and organizations calling on the administration to continue to use Temporary Protected Status as Congress intended.

Updated date: 09/20/2017

 


Media resources

A growing body of evidence calls into question the process followed by the Trump administration in terminating Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for countries including Honduras, El Salvador and Haiti.

Updated date: 10/01/2018

 

Parish Resources

A collection of talking points for Catholic parish leaders to use when discussing the importance of keeping Temporary Protected Status.

Updated date: 10/01/2018

This resource will help parishioners learn more about TPS and how they can help their community respond to the decisions on TPS for certain nationalities.

Updated date: 10/04/2018