Resources on Recognition and Accreditation

You may search for resources either by title or by month and year.

CLINIC submitted comments in response to proposed revisions to Forms EOIR-31 and EOIR-31A, the forms used to apply for Recognition and Accreditation for non-attorney representatives working for nonprofit organizations.

Posted on

This is a draft of the upcoming new Form EOIR-31A. Organizations must submit this form to request accreditation for each new or renewing non-attorney representative who provides clients with immigration legal services.

Posted on

This is a draft of the upcoming new Form EOIR-31. Organizations must submit this form to request recognition as a non-profit approved to designate non-attorney representative(s) who provide(s) clients with immigration legal services.

Posted on

On Oct. 18, 2019, CLINIC submitted a public comment opposing the interim rule reorganizing EOIR. CLINIC’s opposition is based on the rule’s formal establishment of the Office of Policy, relocation of the Office of Legal Access Programs under the Office of Policy, and authorization for the EOIR director to issue appellate decisions in certain cases.

Posted on

The Justice Department put in place an interim rule on Aug. 26 that threatens the Recognition and Accreditation Program. This collection of stories illustrates why this vital program must be protected.

Posted on

EOIR’s Office of Policy is a new office created to centralize communications, data collection, strategic planning, and agency policy and regulatory review and development. The Office of Policy is a highly politicized office, and many troubling policies are widely believed to have originated from the Office of Policy.  The Office of Policy plays an enormous role in the functioning of EOIR. Despite its outsize role, there is very little publicly available information about the office, its staff, its functions, or the office’s interactions with the other components of EOIR.

Posted on

EOIR’s R&A Program accredits non-attorneys to represent noncitizens before the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR), which includes the immigration courts and the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA). Once accredited by EOIR, “Accredited Representatives” may only provide immigration legal services through recognized organizations, which are non-profit, federally tax-exempt entities.

Posted on

What is an accredited representative? An accredited representative is a non-attorney who has demonstrated to the Department of Justice that they have enough education and experience in immigration law to provide immigration legal services. The purpose of the program is to improve access to justice by increasing the number of representatives serving low-income immigrants. Accredited representatives must work for a non-profit organization providing immigration legal services to low-income clients.

Posted on

CLINIC has developed a template to help you draft a public comment in response to the Interim Rule reorganization the Executive Office of Immigration Review, or EOIR, which went into effect Aug. 26, 2019. The rule has profound consequences both on our system of laws and on people ⁠— people like your clients who depend on the Recognition & Accreditation, or R&A, program in order to access high-quality legal assistance. The rule will also allow political forces to shape immigration law and will guarantee worse outcomes for those navigating our immigration system.

Posted on

This backgrounder provides an overview of the Department of Justice interim rule published Aug. 26 that reorganizes the Executive Office for Immigration Review. The backgrounder explains how the rule works, the impact on our system of laws and the impact on human lives.

Posted on

The Justice Department’s Executive Office for Immigration Review, or EOIR, issued an Interim Rule that changes its internal organization, the delegation of authority to adjudicate cases and appeals, and official position titles at the Board of Immigration Appeals, or BIA. The rule was issued on and goes into effect Aug. 26, 2019.

Posted on

How can CLINIC help me get the training I need to qualify for initial accreditation?

Applicants for initial accreditation must establish that they have broad knowledge and adequate experience in immigration law and have taken at least one recent formal overview of immigration law course. CLINIC offers a course that meets this requirement: Comprehensive Overview Immigration Law (COIL) e-learning course. This course will be offered several times a year.

Posted on

General

#1: If you have a question regarding the R&A program - before you reach out to OLAP for guidance, first read the FAQs on the R&A Program website. You may find your question is already answered there. You can find the FAQs here: https://www.justice.gov/eoir/recognition-and-accreditation-program. The FAQs also contain OLAP’s contact information should your question be unaddressed.

Posted on

Important Notice - New Final Rule for Recognition and Accreditation

The Department of Justice’s Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) issued a new rule for recognition of nonprofit organizations and accreditation for non-attorney staff serving as legal representatives in immigration proceedings. This rule became effective on January 18, 2017.

Posted on

The Department of Justice’s rule on the Recognition and Accreditation of Non-Attorney Representatives is now available. The rule makes substantial changes to the Recognition and Accreditation Program, which includes removing the nominal fee requirement and requiring renewal of recognition. You may review the rule on this page. You may also download a copy or view it on the Federal Register website.

Posted on

The Department of Justice’s rule on the Recognition and Accreditation of Non-Attorney Representatives is now available. The rule makes substantial changes to the Recognition and Accreditation Program, which includes removing the nominal fee requirement and requiring renewal of recognition. You may review the rule on this page. You may also download a copy or view it on the Federal Register website.

Posted on

SILVER SPRING, Maryland – The Department of Justice’s rule on the Recognition and Accreditation of Non-Attorney Representatives is now available at the Federal Register website. The final rule is scheduled to be published in the Federal Register on Dec. 19. It will take effect Jan. 18, 2017.

The rule makes substantial changes to the Recognition and Accreditation Program, which includes removing the nominal fee requirement and requiring renewal of recognition. The leadership of Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc., welcomes the changes.

Posted on

The BIA has held that an adoption is valid for immigration purposes – even if the child has turned 16 at the time of the final order – if the state court has allowed the order to be backdated. Matter of R. Huang, 26 I&N Dec. 627 (BIA 2015). The BIA held that since the effective date of the adoption decree was made retroactive to the date the petition was filed, when the child was under 16, that the adoption will be valid for immigration purposes.

Posted on