Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Expanded DACA and DAPA are on hold, but you can still apply for DACA under the original guidelines.  Find out who qualifies and how you may be able to take steps to become DACA eligible.  CLINIC immigration attorney Ilissa Mira and BIA Accredited Representative Maciel Jacques share some tips on learning about your immigration options and preparing for the future.

This webinar is for educators, counselors, and others working in schools and adult education programs who want to learn more about immigration relief for undocumented students and their families.  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for the Parents of U.S. Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) programs protect undocumented students and parents from deportation so that they can work legally and pursue their educational goals.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) had planned to begin accepting applications for the expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on February 18, 2015 and for the new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program on May 19, 2015. Unfortunately, DHS has delayed the launch of both expanded DACA and DAPA due to a federal court decision temporarily halting their implementation.

Read about the government launching an overseas processing program for certain central american refugee children, find out who's accredited for the month, and see the study that indicates a significant percentage of unauthorized immigrants may be eligible for permanent status.

Pages