Sign up for e-news

Learn More

Login Logout Search

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Recently, we sent all affiliates a notice informing them of the July 17th deadline for returning three-year EADs requested by USCIS in order to comply with the Texas court’s February 16, 2015 injunction. USCIS reports that there are still approximately 900 DACA recipients who have not yet returned their three-year EADs. We have been informed that USCIS has already taken additional steps to direct the return of the three-year EADs and is planning further adverse actions in the near future. These actions may include:

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a memorandum allowing individuals who came to the U.S. as children and meet certain guidelines to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). A person who is granted DACA receives permission to live and work in the U.S. for two years (may be renewed). If someone is approved for DACA, s/he may apply for a social security number and in most states, a driver’s license.

Click the button below for more information about DACA and to view CLINIC’s resources for legal service providers and DACA applicants.


During July, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) undertook a number of extraordinary actions to urgently retrieve approximately 2,600 three-year work permits it claims were erroneously issued or mailed to recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and to replace them with two-year permits.

By Jen Riddle and Jill Bussey

This month marks the 3-year anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Since DACA launched in 2012, over 664,000 individuals have been granted temporary reprieve from deportation and a work permit.  All 50 states now permit DACA recipients to apply for driver’s licenses, following policy reversals in Nebraska and Arizona due to legislative action (in NE) and litigation (in AZ). 

Expanded DACA and DAPA are on hold, but you can still apply for DACA under the original guidelines.  Find out who qualifies and how you may be able to take steps to become DACA eligible.  CLINIC immigration attorney Ilissa Mira and BIA Accredited Representative Maciel Jacques share some tips on learning about your immigration options and preparing for the future.

This webinar is for educators, counselors, and others working in schools and adult education programs who want to learn more about immigration relief for undocumented students and their families.  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for the Parents of U.S. Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) programs protect undocumented students and parents from deportation so that they can work legally and pursue their educational goals.