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Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Information and Resources

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a memorandum allowing individuals who came to the U.S. as children and meet certain guidelines to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). A person who is granted DACA receives permission to live and work in the U.S. for two years (may be renewed). If someone is approved for DACA, s/he may apply for a social security number and in most states, a driver’s license.

Click the button below for more information about DACA and to view CLINIC’s resources for legal service providers and DACA applicants.

 

CLINIC's Comments in Response to Changes in Form I-821D

On February 14, 2014, CLINIC submitted comments to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services about the agency’s proposed changes to Form I-821D, the form used to request Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  The proposed changes to the form establish procedures for individuals to demonstrate continued eligibility for deferred action – extending the two years of deferral originally granted to them. 

 

Update on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

By Tatyana Delgado, CLINIC Training and Legal Support Attorney

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued a memorandum allowing individuals who entered the U.S. as children and meet certain guidelines to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).   U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began accepting DACA applications in August 2012 and issuing DACA approvals in September 2012.  This article provides updates on a variety of issues related to DACA eligibility and adjudications. 

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