Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

Recently, we sent all affiliates a notice informing them of the July 17th deadline for returning three-year EADs requested by USCIS in order to comply with the Texas court’s February 16, 2015 injunction. USCIS reports that there are still approximately 900 DACA recipients who have not yet returned their three-year EADs. We have been informed that USCIS has already taken additional steps to direct the return of the three-year EADs and is planning further adverse actions in the near future. These actions may include:

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued a memorandum allowing individuals who came to the U.S. as children and meet certain guidelines to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). A person who is granted DACA receives permission to live and work in the U.S. for two years (may be renewed). If someone is approved for DACA, s/he may apply for a social security number and in most states, a driver’s license.

Click the button below for more information about DACA and to view CLINIC’s resources for legal service providers and DACA applicants.

 

In connection with the State of Texas v. U.S. litigation, USCIS began recalling over 2,600 grants of Deferred Action Childhood Arrival (DACA) and work authorization in May 2015. USCIS increased its recall efforts dramatically following a Court Order issued on July 7. CLINIC officially registered its opposition to the recall and any resulting terminations. CLINIC worked closely with affiliates to support, advise, and assist them and their clients to understand and take necessary actions as well as to responsibly spread the word in the community. CLINIC and its affiliate efforts helped result in 99.2 percent compliance with the recall. Of the 22 terminations of status issued, 12 were reinstated.

During July, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) undertook a number of extraordinary actions to urgently retrieve approximately 2,600 three-year work permits it claims were erroneously issued or mailed to recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and to replace them with two-year permits.

Starting July 16th, US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) will begin home visits to certain DACA recipients who have still failed to return their three-year employment authorization documents (EADs) that were received in error.  In addition to these home visits, USCIS has begun issuing Notices of Intent to Terminate (NOIDs) warning that individuals who do not return their three-year EAD by July 30th, 2015 will have their DACA and EAD terminated.

By Jen Riddle and Jill Bussey

This month marks the 3-year anniversary of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Since DACA launched in 2012, over 664,000 individuals have been granted temporary reprieve from deportation and a work permit.  All 50 states now permit DACA recipients to apply for driver’s licenses, following policy reversals in Nebraska and Arizona due to legislative action (in NE) and litigation (in AZ). 

Expanded DACA and DAPA are on hold, but you can still apply for DACA under the original guidelines.  Find out who qualifies and how you may be able to take steps to become DACA eligible.  CLINIC immigration attorney Ilissa Mira and BIA Accredited Representative Maciel Jacques share some tips on learning about your immigration options and preparing for the future.

This webinar is for educators, counselors, and others working in schools and adult education programs who want to learn more about immigration relief for undocumented students and their families.  Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Deferred Action for the Parents of U.S. Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) programs protect undocumented students and parents from deportation so that they can work legally and pursue their educational goals.

The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) had planned to begin accepting applications for the expanded Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program on February 18, 2015 and for the new Deferred Action for Parents of Americans and Lawful Permanent Residents (DAPA) program on May 19, 2015. Unfortunately, DHS has delayed the launch of both expanded DACA and DAPA due to a federal court decision temporarily halting their implementation.

Read about the government launching an overseas processing program for certain central american refugee children, find out who's accredited for the month, and see the study that indicates a significant percentage of unauthorized immigrants may be eligible for permanent status.

Learn more about the Haitian family reunification program to be implemented in 2015, peruse the FAQs on the USCIS updates to DACA, and meet our affiliate Mi Mujeres in this month's profile.

By Ilissa Mira

Read about the announcement Obama gave about in-country processing for Central American children. Also, check out this month's question corner to see if you know the answer.

By Ilissa Mira

The Ombudsman’s Office met with CLINIC and other immigration advocates to discuss developments regarding DACA and reports from the field.  This article provides updates on a variety of issues related to DACA eligibility and adjudication.

USCIS Statistics

Topics include information on how to advocate locally on behalf of unaccompanied minors.

Volunteer Training Part 1 - DACA Overview and the Eligibility Guidelines

 

 


Volunteer Training Part 2 - How to Complete the Application Forms

 

 


Volunteer Training Part 3 -  Overview of the DACA Workshop Model

 

 

 

This webinar provides an overview of the DACA renewal process and highlights other updates to DACA guidance.  We share practice tips and respond to common questions about the renewal process and the new Form I-821D. 

Topics include an update on the USCIS changes to a policy on medical examination reports and a network profile.

This webinar for affiliates discusses the newly revised I-821D and USCIS guidelines for DACA renewal.  We provide updates on DACA policy and advocacy issues and also share program management tips on preparing for DACA renewals.  Finally, we consider how lessons learned from the initial DACA phase can be applied to the renewal process and to future immigration reform.

The presenters for this webinar were: Tatyana Delgado, Ilissa Mira, Allison Posner, Jen Riddle, Nathaly Perez and Michelle Sardone

By Ilissa Mira, CLINIC Training and Legal Support Attorney

 

On June 5, 2014, USCIS released the much anticipated revised Form I-821D, Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  The new dual-purpose form will be used to file both initial and renewal DACA requests.  As of the release date, USCIS will not accept DACA requests submitted on the old form.

This webinar is for legal service providers helping Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients apply for permission to travel abroad using advance parole.

Taking the opportunity to submit further comments to USCIS about the DACA application and renewal process, CLINIC commended the agency for the changes it did make, including extending the DACA renewal application window to 150 days, simplifying the education-related questions, and streamlining the application requirement for renewal applicants.  CLINIC also encouraged USCIS to make additional changes to the form and instructions to help both initial and renewal applicants better navigate the application process.  Among the chief concerns for CLINIC and its affiliates is ensuring that DACA

By Ilissa Mira, CLINIC Training and Legal Support Attorney

On February 14, 2014, CLINIC submitted comments to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services about the agency’s proposed changes to Form I-821D, the form used to request Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).  The proposed changes to the form establish procedures for individuals to demonstrate continued eligibility for deferred action – extending the two years of deferral originally granted to them. 

 

CLINIC released a DACA Public Service Announcement (PSA) Radio Campaign funded by Our Sunday Visitor. Through this campaign, CLINIC hopes to educate DACA-eligible individuals and encourage them to apply for and receive the help they need to stay and work legally in the U.S.

GENERAL

 

1. Can DACA recipients travel abroad? 

Yes, but only if they receive permission from the government. 

By Tatyana Delgado, CLINIC Training and Legal Support Attorney

On June 15, 2012, the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security issued a memorandum allowing individuals who entered the U.S. as children and meet certain guidelines to apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).   U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) began accepting DACA applications in August 2012 and issuing DACA approvals in September 2012.  This article provides updates on a variety of issues related to DACA eligibility and adjudications. 

By Minyoung Ohm

RIS Staff Attorney 

 

This webinar is for non-immigration lawyers, community organizers, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipients, and others who would like to learn about how DACA recipients can travel abroad.

This webinar is for legal service providers and others helping DREAMers apply for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). One year after DACA’s launch, we will review important DACA developments and explore ways we can continue to improve DACA-related services.

Advance Parole for DACA Recipients

By Emily Creighton, Mary Kenney, and Patrick Taurel (American Immigration Council)

and Susan Schreiber and Tatyana Delgado (CLINIC) 

Introduction

A new edition of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) application (Form I-821D) and instructions, dated June 25, 2013, is now available on the USCIS website. After September 9, 2013, USCIS will only accept this version of the DACA application form.

A new edition of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) application (Form I-821D) and instructions, dated June 25, 2013, is now available on the USCIS website. After September 9, 2013, USCIS will only accept this version of the DACA application form.

This webinar is for legal service providers, immigrant advocates, educators, faith leaders, employers, community organizers, and others helping DREAMers apply for DACA or navigate work, school, and life after receiving DACA. Have you had issues helping DACA applicants meet the education eligibility requirements, obtain juvenile records, or access scholarships or loans?

Last August, the Obama Administration began implementing its Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program – a policy through which certain undocumented individuals receive temporary permission to stay in the U.S. for two years as well as the right to apply for employment authorization. After some initial resistance to issuing driver’s licenses to DACA grantees, most states eventually decided to do so. At this time, only two states – Arizona and Nebraska – continue to deny state driver’s licenses or identification cards to DACA recipients.   

USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas shared additional details on the June 15th Deferred Action policy memorandum on a Stakeholder Teleconference.  All the new details can be found on the USCIS website at: www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.  Under this new administration policy, DHS will be able to grant deferred action to certain qualifying young people, often known as DREAMers, who have fulfilled age, residency, and educational or military requirements.

USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas shared additional details on the June 15th Deferred Action policy memorandum on a Stakeholder Teleconference.  All the new details can be found on the USCIS website at: www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.  Under this new administration policy, DHS will be able to grant deferred action to certain qualifying young people, often known as DREAMers, who have fulfilled age, residency, and educational or military requirements.

A group application workshop is a one-day, and in some cases two-day, community even that brings professionals and trained volunteers together to assist childhood arrivals or “DREAMers” in completing applications for Deferred Action.  The workshop is an essential tool for efficiently and effectively providing application assistance to large numbers of people.  The success of the workshop model depends on careful planning, thorough training of staff and volunteers, and high quality services.  The purpose of this toolkit is to help charitable immigration programs and their volunteers achieve

This webinar discusses what we know so far about the new deferred action policy for undocumented immigrants who entered the U.S. as children, including basic eligibility requirements, how to document eligibility, "red flags" for applicants, and advocacy on the policy's implementation. Panelists include Jennie Guilfoyle, Training and Legal Support Attorney at CLINIC; Paromita Shah, Associate Director of the National Immigration Project of the National Lawyers Guild; Don Lyster, Director of NILC's Washington, DC office; and Lorella Praeli of United We Dream.

Jeff Chenoweth of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) discusses what nonprofit legal services providers can do now to prepare for Deferred Action. This includes outreach, engaging "Dreamers," planning service delivery, supporting staff and volunteers, and more.

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As everyone awaits the details on how the new Deferred Action program will be implemented, your agency should start taking steps to prepare.  This webinar discusses different strategies for meeting the increased demand for services.  Staff from CLINIC affiliates discuss what strategies have worked for their programs including group-processing workshops, coalition building, information sessions, and one-on-one processing models.  Join staff from CLINIC's Advocacy, Capacity Building, and Training & Legal Support sections for this webinar to make sure your agency is prepared to serve clie

As you know, the President recently announced a new process where certain children will be able to apply for deferred action status and employment authorization. We are still waiting for the details on how this program will be implemented.  This webinar reviews and summarize what we do know.  It also discusses strategies for dealing with the press, communicating with clients, performing outreach to the community, and preparing your program for increased demand for services.