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National Legal Center for Immigrants

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<img src="/sites/all/themes/clinic/images/programs/nlci.jpg" height="55px" width="55px" alt="" border="0" align="left" hspace="10px" vspace="10px"><p>The National Legal Center works to expand the availability of professional, low-cost immigration services by providing legal expertise, training and technical assistance to CLINIC’s member agencies and constituents. Attorneys from the National Legal Center provide legal advice to more than 1,000 nonprofit, community-based immigration service providers through phone consultations, multi-day trainings, broadcast e-mails, and a variety of publications. Its success in delivering legal support to this expanding network has made CLINIC widely recognized as the most productive legal support group in the field.
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BIA Clarifies When Derivatives May Adjust under 245(i)

BIA Clarifies When Derivatives May Adjust under 245(i)

By Charles Wheeler

In a recent decision the Board of Immigration Appeals held that after-acquired derivatives are not eligible to be considered “grandfathered” for purposes of eligibility for section 245(i) adjustment of status. Matter of Estrada, 26 I&N Dec. 180 (BIA 2013).  This decision clarifies but is consistent with prior USCIS memos interpreting this provision.

USCIS Finalizes Regulation on Provisional Waivers for Unlawful Presence

On January 3, 2013, the USCIS finalized its regulation regarding the adjudication of waivers for those who are consular processing and would be triggering the unlawful presence ground of inadmissibility.  The rule provides a process by which the agency will adjudicate these waivers before the applicants leave for their immigrant visa interview.  The procedure would be available only to immediate relatives who are inadmissible based on unlawful presence – and no other grounds – and who can establish extreme hardship to a qualifying U.S.

Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

Children who have been the victims of abuse, abandonment or neglect are among the most vulnerable immigrants in our society.  These children may qualify for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS), a pathway to becoming a lawful permanent resident.  The presenters discuss the eligibility requirements for SIJS as well as the procedures for applying both affirmatively and defensively in removal proceedings.  The presenters for this webinar are Sarah Bronstein and Kristina Karpinski, Training and Legal Support Attorneys with Catholic Legal Immigration Network.

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