Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities | Page 4 | CLINIC

Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities

<img src="/sites/all/themes/clinic/images/programs/ccic.jpg" height="55px" width="55px" alt="" border="0" align="left" hspace="10px" vspace="10px"><p>The Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities strengthens immigrant rights community by preparing charitable immigration programs to expand their service-delivery capacity and establishing a coordinated service-delivery and legal support architecture.

Through its various projects, the Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities seeks to develop capacity for lasting change by working with a cross-section of national and regional groups in under-served communities, (whether geographic, ethnic, or population-specific communities) to start or improve existing programs that will allow millions of immigrants throughout the United States to understand and to exercise their rights.

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 4: Network Technology Innovations

April 24, 2012

Join us for Part 4 in a four part series for a presentation of tech innovations within the CLINIC network. We'll learn about CitizenshipWorks, a program designed to assist local programs in helping clients naturalize. We'll also learn from several network affiliates about innovative ways they've used technology in their offices and how it has impacted the way they reach the public. Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington DC office moderates the discussion.

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 3: Case Management Software

Join us for Part 3 in a four part series for a conversation about case management software and other database capabilities. Topics will include why to use case management software, how to choose a software package, and how best to use software in your daily work. Jack Holmgren, a Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's San Francisco office, will moderate the discussion.

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 2: Effectively Using Social Media and Outreach Tools

Join us for Part 2 in a four part series as we talk about how best to use social media and outreach tech tools to increase the visibility of your program on the internet.  We'll compare the current options such as blogging, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter and examine the pluses and minuses of using each one.  We'll also talk about sources for tech support, particularly for non-profits.

Held on February 28, 2012.

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 1: Introduction to Office Technology Tools

Join us for Part 1 in a four part series as we explore quick and easy tech upgrades your program can make to improve communication and service to the community . We'll talk about technological changes coming down the pike from USCIS and why it is important to get a jump start on planning for those today. We will also hear from several members of CLINIC staff give tips on how best to access technology used by our organization to better serve our network. Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington D.C.

Citizenship for Elders: Issues and Options in Test Preparation, 2nd Edition (2012)

Citizenship for Elders is a unique handbook for teachers and administrators on creating and managing a citizenship program for the older learner.  This handbook brings together the observations and insights of teachers from across the country on older learners from a wide range of cultures.  It is based on a nationwide survey of 200 programs.  It identifies the issues in teaching elders and makes recommendations for instruction and program design.  The recommendations are practice-based, with a focus on innovative and promising practices.  The suggestions on learning activities, cu

Spotlight on Integration: 6 Part Series

Looking for ideas to promote and encourage immigrant integration within your community? CLINIC offers this 6 part series that spotlights immigrant integration initiatives across our network. Learn the definition of immigrant integration, its importance for our network and nation, and how it can be promoted locally. Featured programs encourage relationships between the receiving community and immigrants, give elderly refugees a place to use skills gained in their home countries, and connect asylees with available resources.

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