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Toolkit for BIA Recognition & Accreditation

 

Does your nonprofit agency want to develop a legal immigration program, but lack attorneys on staff or the money to hire them?

Does your nonprofit agency want to continue providing legal immigration services, but avoid engaging in the unauthorized practice of law? 

Does your nonprofit agency have immigration attorneys on staff, but want to expand its capacity by getting authorization for non-attorney staff to practice immigration law?

In these situations, your agency needs to seek recognition for itself and accreditation for its non-attorney staff from the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA).  BIA recognition and accreditation is the Department of Justice’s certification of charitable immigration agencies and staff, and allows non-attorney staff to practice immigration law before the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and the immigration courts. 

The rules governing recognition and accreditation can be found at 8 CFR Section 292.2.

However, the regulations are brief and do not address some of the challenges in compiling the BIA recognition and accreditation application. 

This toolkit is designed to educate agencies on the need for BIA recognition and accreditation and to assist them in the application process.  It is divided into four sections:

  • Section One provides background information about the importance of BIA recognition and accreditation. 
  • Section Two takes you through the steps needed to prepare for and compile the application. 
  • Section Three provides guidelines on the professional code of conduct for BIA accredited representatives and information on how to protect your agency from liability.
  • Section Four focuses on the widespread problem of immigration fraud and provides resources for educating the immigrant community.   


CLINIC welcomes your feedback on this toolkit, including suggestions for additional materials to include.  If you have any feedback or questions, please contact Laura Burdick at lburdick@cliniclegal.org.

 

1.  GENERAL INFORMATION

EOIR Main Page on the Recognition & Accreditation Program

New “BIA Issues Three Decisions on Recognition and Accreditation” – CLINIC news article

New BIA Precedent Decision, Matter of United Farm Workers Foundation (2014)

New BIA Precedent Decision, Matter of Ayuda (2014)

Update on New BIA Regulations

CLINIC webinar, “All About BIA Recognition and Accreditation”

Board of Immigration Appeals FAQ Sheet on the Recognition and Accreditation Program

"BIA Releases New FAQ Sheet on Recognition and Accreditation" - CLINIC news article

BIA Precedent Decision, Matter of Central California Legal Services, Inc. (2013)

“BIA Addresses Training Requirements for Accredited Representatives” – CLINIC news article

"BIA Issues Two Decisions on Recognition and Accreditation" - CLINIC news article

Form G-28: Notice of Entry of Appearance as Attorney or Representative

 

2. PREPARATION: SETTING AN ACTION PLAN, ACQUIRING ESSENTIAL TRAINING, AND COMPILING THE APPLICATION

Step-by-Step Guide for BIA Accreditation and Recognition - World Relief and CLINIC

Form EOIR-31, Request for Recognition of a Non-Profit Religious, Charitable, Social Service, or Similar Organization

NEW Form EOIR-31A, Request by Organization for Accreditation of Non-Attorney Representative

Checklist for BIA Recognition and Accreditation Process

Action Plan for Applying for BIA Recognition and Accreditation

CLINIC Training Calendar

Self-Directed E-Learning Course on Fundamentals of Immigration Law

Immigration Advocates Network (IAN) Training Calendar

Immigration Law Library Resources

Sample Application for BIA Agency Recognition and Staff Accreditation: See page 16 of Step-by-Step Guide

Sample Application Cover Letter for BIA Staff Accreditation: See page 20 of Step-by-Step Guide

 

3. CONSIDERATIONS FOR PRACTICE AFTER BIA ACCREDITATION

EOIR Fact Sheet on Professional Conduct Rules for Immigration Attorneys and Representatives

CLINIC's Core Standards for Charitable Immigration Programs

Model Code of Professional Responsibility for BIA Accredited Representatives

Prohibition Against Providing Legal Services Outside the Office & Expectations of Employees

Applying for Renewal of Agency Staff/Volunteer Accreditation: See page 14 of Step-by-Step Guide

Immigration Advocates Network manual, "Notario Fraud Remedies: A Practice Manual for Immigration Practioners"

 

4. IMMIGRANT COMMUNITY EDUCATION MATERIALS

How to Tell if an Agency is Recognized:

EOIR List of Currently Disciplined Practitioners

Outreach Flyers:

American Bar Association (ABA) Campaign to Fight Notario Fraud

USCIS Information on Finding Legal Advice

USCIS Outreach Materials

Federal Trade Commission Resources

Resources by type: 

Managing an Immigration Program: Steps for Creating and Increasing Legal Capacity

Case Management Toolkit

This toolkit is intended to facilitate the process of designing and/or improving the case management system in your immigration program.  In a legal immigration context, case management system consists of: policies and procedures; forms; a database; and files used by legal representatives in a standardized manner for the purposes of delivering professional services and avoiding errors that can result in malpractice and liability.

For an agency just starting an immigration program you may be asking a series of questions:  How will your immigration program deliver services to clients? How do you conduct intake? How do you select cases for representation? How do you collect fees? What systems does your office have in place to ensure that your staff is working effectively and efficiently, and avoiding malpractice and liability issues? How do you track deadlines and caseload priorities?

For more established immigration programs you may be asking these same questions if your office does not have standardized case management policies and procedures in place or if your office finds that the current system is not effective in delivering client services.  

Having a well-designed case management system is essential to running a responsible legal immigration program.  It helps to ensure uniformity, consistency, and high quality work produced by staff, and helps managers more easily supervise a program.  For new immigration programs, it is wise to establish a standardized case management system in the early stages of program development, even before services are provided.  For established programs it is wise to revisit and revise your current case management policies and procedures to standardize them and ensure they are working for all stakeholders: the parent organization leadership, program director, staff, clients, and funders.

This toolkit reviews the essential components of case management.   It provides various resources to help your immigration program design and implement an effective case management system.  For organizations providing Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) immigration services, there are additional considerations when designing your case management system noted throughout the toolkit. 

The toolkit is divided into three sections: Thinking About Case Management; Developing Case Management Policies and Procedures; and Immigration Case Management Tools consisting of case management database and case management forms.  We encourage you to review all sections of this toolkit for a comprehensive understanding of case management system.

  • Provides fundamental information about the case management system and its different components.

Developing Case Management Policies and Procedures

  • Discusses the importance of establishing and documenting step-by-step policies and procedures.

Immigration Case Management Tools

  • Provides information about the types of tools available.  These include case management databases (software and web-based) and forms commonly used for program management and client services

Tell CLINIC What You Think or Need

CLINIC welcomes your feedback on this toolkit, including suggestions or recommendations for additional materials you would like to see on this webpage.  If you have any feedback or questions, please contact Martin Gauto at mgauto@cliniclegal.org .

Resources by type: 

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) is pleased to announce the establishment of an innovative program to create capacity for high quality charitable legal immigration services in the southeastern United States. The initiative will build a stronger community of expert service providers in largely underserved states where the population of at-risk immigrants is on the rise.

Blog tags: 
Leya Speasmaker

As Citizenship Week comes to a close, it is worthwhile to remember that naturalization is but one step on the pathway to the larger goal of immigrant integration.  Immigrant integration is the creation of something new in the places where we live – a more inclusive community that reflects the needs and wants of all its residents. Immigrant integration takes deliberate and on-going work by both the receiving community and the newcomers, and it requires a community to grow and change as it stretches to allow everyone a chance to access services, make an impact, and participate actively.

Tessa W. McKenzie

On Constitution and Citizenship Day, we honor, not only the newcomers who have and will naturalize, but also the champions who guide them through complex immigration processes and embark on innovative ways to overcome obstacles to immigrant integration.

Leya Speasmaker

FaithAction International House, a CLINIC affiliate led by Reverend David Fraccaro, is making great strides in promoting and encouraging immigrant integration within the city of Greensboro, North Carolina.

Blog tags: 
Tessa W. McKenzie

The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.

Blog tags: 
Laura Burdick

On March 17, 2015, U.S.

Jeff Chenoweth

News stories and images of desperate African and Middle Eastern people fleeing their home countries  aboard overcrowded ships that sink in the Mediterranean Sea are heartbreaking and speak to why CLINIC has a mission to serve vulnerable migrants.  These stories also give CLINIC pause to reflect on how black immigrants arrive to the U.S. and are fairing.  New findings from the Pew Research Center about black immigrants are striking and evoke a lesser known story about CLINIC’s history of helping black immigrants achieve their dreams in the U.S.

Blog tags: 
Leya Speasmaker

On April 15, 2015, the recently formed White House Task Force on New Americans submitted its strategic action plan outlining a federal integration strategy to President Obama.

Leya Speasmaker

The Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (HICA!), the brain-child of Executive Director, Isabel Rubio, opened its doors in 1999. Ms. Rubio, a long time Birmingham resident, recognized the need for an immigrant-integration focused organization in the state of Alabama, and she has worked hard to ensure that immigrant integration is the cornerstone of their mission and the primary goal of all of their services.

Leya Speasmaker

During the tax season, there are many ways for immigration legal service programs to help clients complete this important task, as well as avoid falling victim to scams. Visit CLINIC’s new Center for Immigrant Integration for resources on tax assistance preparation and other ways to encourage immigrant integration in your community.

Tessa W. McKenzie

Our commitment to supporting newcomers is personal and at CLINIC, we are inspired by friends who have overcome numerous obstacles to become naturalized US citizens.  Saba Hailu is one such friend, who journeyed from aspiring citizen to new American.  Saba’s determination strengthens our resolve to ensure that the foreign-born have access to opportunities for citizenship and civic participation.

Martin Gauto

One of CLINIC’s most fundamental goals is to boost legal capacity in underserved areas in the United States.  An area seeing a severe shortage in low-cost, professional immigration legal service providers, the Inland Empire (or the “IE” as it is known) region of Southern California is home to over one million foreign-born persons.  Training Occupational Development Education Communicates (TODEC) is one service provider assisting newcomers with quality, charitable legal help in the IE.

Nathaly Perez

Adonia R. Simpson, Esq. is readying Catholic Charities of Baltimore, Maryland to serve a rapid increase in the number of immigrants.  This is a result of President Obama’s executive actions announced on November 20 offering administrative relief to an estimated four million immigrants.

Leya Speasmaker

If you were in need of legal assistance, where would you go for help? How would you know if they could assist you?

Silvana Arista

There are currently about 539 women and children detained at the temporary family detention center run by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Artesia, New Mexico.  This facility is one of three family detention centers currently operating in the United States.  The women and children detained at the facility are asylum seekers and a vast majority of them are survivors of violence and sexual assault.  Having recently returned from Artesia myself, supporting staff and volunteers assisting detainees, my thoughts go out to detained victims of abuse this October, Domestic

Laura Burdick

Syracuse, New York has a long history as an immigrant gateway city, and was home to many immigrants from Italy, Germany, Ireland, Ukraine, and Russia who arrived in the U.S.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Maura Moser, Director of Communications

(301) 565-4830 or Email: mmoser@cliniclegal.org

Silver Spring, MD (September 19, 2014) - The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) congratulates 14 affiliates that received funding through the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Fiscal Year 2014 Citizenship and Integration Grant Program.  Twenty-five percent of the 40 primary grantees are CLINIC affiliates.   

Rommel Calderwood

Each year on September 17, we come together as a nation of immigrants to celebrate Citizenship Day. This is an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of being a U.S. citizen and recognize the many lawful permanent residents (LPRs) in our communities who are on their journey to becoming U.S. citizens.

Martin Gauto

The Inland Empire region of Southern California, east of Los Angeles, is home to over one million foreign-born persons. Comprised of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, the Inland Empire (or the “The IE” as it’s known) has a severe shortage of low-cost, professional immigration legal service providers. 

Jeff Chenoweth

Since its inception two hundred years ago, the story of the Archdiocese of New York is an immigrant story – a tradition which continues today. For more than 30 years, the Archdiocese of New York has provided services to the foreign-born, including refugee resettlement and immigration legal services, through Catholic Charities Community Services (CCCS). As the immigrant and refugee population in the area has grown and changed, so has CCCS.

How to Create a Citizenship Education Program

Are you interested in providing more comprehensive citizenship and immigrant integration services? Join us for this free webinar on citizenship education programs. We discuss how and why legal service providers are well-positioned to offer citizenship classes; present key components of a successful citizenship education program; provide resources and next steps for implementing a program; and hear from a local affiliate with recent experience in starting a citizenship education program. The presenters are Rommel Calderwood, CLINIC Project Coordinator; Laura Burdick and Leya Speasmaker, CLINIC Field Support Coordinators; and Ellen Witoff, Immigration Specialist with Catholic Charities of Buffalo.

Resources by type: 
Jeff Cheoweth

As the nation’s largest network of nonprofit immigration legal programs, CLINIC’s network currently consists of 250 affiliates with 340 office locations in 46 states and continues to grow.  Even as CLINIC’s network expands, however, there are still not enough immigration programs to meet the need for low-cost immigration legal services.

Webinar: Establishing a Strong Case Management System: Part II

A strong case management system is key to a healthy immigration legal program. A strong case management system helps ensure consistency, uniformity, and a high quality of work. It balances the interests of the client in getting the best and speediest representation with those of the agency in providing services efficiently. Join us for Part II of this series. It will focus on case file organization standards, case notes standards, a filing system, case closing procedures, and a tickler system to ensure important deadlines are not missed. The presenters are Director of CLINIC's Capacity Building Section Jeff Chenoweth, and CLINIC Attorney and Field Support Coordinator Martin Gauto.

Held 5/13/14

Resources by type: 

BIA Recognition and Accreditation & Immigration Legal Services for Battered Immigrants

Presented by the

U.S. Department of Justice Office on Violence Against Women (OVW), in partnership with Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) and ASISTA Immigration Assistance

 

June 3-4, 2014

Holiday Inn Center City Charlotte

230 North College Street

Charlotte, NC 28104

(704) 335-5400

* Registration Deadline is May 12, 2014*

Register Here

This two-day course is geared towards non-lawyer legal advocates who will be or are currently working with immigrant survivors of domestic violence (DV) or sexual assault (SA). Trainers will combine a basic overview of immigration law with an introduction to legal and case management skills critical to becoming an effective immigration law advocate. This training is designed to help prepare legal advocates to become Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) accredited. BIA accreditation allows non-lawyers to practice immigration law and assist survivors with obtaining lawful immigration status without the abuser’s knowledge or consent.

Topics covered shall include: an overview of the immigration system and laws, immigrating through marriage and other family relationships, grounds of inadmissibility and removability, immigration remedies under the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA and U status), adjustment of status, BIA recognition and accreditation and ethical considerations in working with immigration cases.

The training will be interactive. Participants will learn to assemble a VAWA application and learn effective interviewing and case management skills. Participants will also have the opportunity to sign up to receive an individual consultation on assembling their BIA recognition and accreditation applications. This is a two-day training, and participants will be required to attend both days of the training. 

Faculty members include Silvana Arista, Kristina Karpinski, and Debbie Smith of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) and Gail Pendleton of ASISTA Immigration Assistance. CLINIC and ASISTA assists DV and SA advocates with obtaining BIA recognition for their agency and BIA accreditation for themselves as staff working for those agencies.

This training is open to OVW grantees and grant partners from the Legal Assistance for Victims grant program (LAV). Priority for the training will be given to LAV grantees and their grant partners.  Grantees from other OVW grant programs, including OVW Technical Assistance providers, must obtain advanced consent from their Program Specialist and will be confirmed if space is available.  Please note that this training is open solely to non-lawyer legal advocates.

 

Registration is limited to 35 participants. Up to two participants from the same organization/agency are permitted to register. If there are more than two participants from the same organization/agency interested in attending, we will place them on a waiting list and contact them if additional spaces become available.

Please register no later than May 12, 2014:

Registration

 

Do you need special accommodations and/or wheelchair access? Will you require a spoken language interpreter? Will you require open captioning, American Sign Language or other type of interpreting services?  

 

If you have any questions about the training or registration form, please contact: Silvana Arista of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network Inc. (CLINIC) at 301-565-4827 or via Email at sarista@cliniclegal.org.

 

 

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Establishing a Strong Case Management System: Part I

Held 4/29/14

A strong case management system is key to a healthy immigration legal program and helps ensure consistency, uniformity, and a high quality of work. It balances the interests of the client in getting the best and speediest representation with those of the agency in providing services efficiently. Join us for Part I of a two-part webinar training on case management. During this webinar we will begin a discussion of the essential elements of a good case management system, including: policy and procedures manuals, intake procedures and forms, case selection criteria and procedures, scope of representation, retainer agreements and a tickler system that ensures the agency doesn't miss client deadlines.  The presenters are Director of CLINIC's Capacity Building Section Jeff Chenoweth, and CLINIC Attorney and Field Support Coordinator Martin Gauto.

Download the Powerpoints for "Establishing a Strong Case Management System: Part I"

Resources by type: 

Toolkit for Naturalization Workshops

Introduction

A naturalization group application workshop is a one-day community event that brings professionals and trained volunteers together to assist Lawful Permanent Residents in completing the Application for Naturalization (N-400).  The workshop is an essential tool for efficiently and effectively providing naturalization assistance to large numbers of people.  The success of the workshop model depends on careful planning, thorough training of staff and volunteers, and high quality services. The purpose of this toolkit is to help charitable immigration programs achieve a successful workshop. The forms and sample documents can be used as is or adapted by local programs for their own needs.

We welcome your feedback on this toolkit and its utility. Also, if you have any documents your agency has developed that you would like to send us for inclusion in the toolkit, or suggestions for additional materials to include, please send these to lburdick@cliniclegal.org

General Information

Planning & Organizing

Outreach

Sample Outreach Flyers Announcing Naturalization Workshops:

Volunteers

Forms to Use in the Workshop

Attachments for the N-400

Information for Applicants

·         NEW NAC Best Practices Toolkit for Using Volunteers [please add this]

Resources by type: 
Jeff Chenoweth

Brooklyn is one of the nation’s most vibrant metropolitan areas with a dense and multi-ethnic population.  Its immigrant history is storied as in A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, an American literary classic. With a large foreign-born population there is a growing need for affordable immigration legal services specifically for people with low-incomes. For that reason, CLINIC, other nonprofit organizations, and immigrant advocates joined to start such a program in Brooklyn.

Webinar: Top Ten Issues in Program Management

Join CLINIC for a conversation about the top most common program management issues and how program managers resolve them. Topics will range from the equipment and tools needed for an immigration legal service program to tracking cases data and deadlines to setting a budget for staff professional development. Capacity Building director Jeff Chenoweth and Field Support Coordinator Leya Speasmaker will be presenting.

Resources by type: 

CLINIC Concludes Successful Two-Year National Capacity Building Grant

By Laura Burdick

In December 2013, CLINIC completed a two-year, $600,000 national capacity building project funded by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Office of Citizenship.  The goal of this project was to build the long-term capacity of local affiliate agencies to provide high quality, comprehensive citizenship preparation services to Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). Through this project, CLINIC provided technical assistance and funding to four local affiliate agencies to establish new programs in ESL/citizenship education and/or naturalization application assistance.  The four local agencies were Catholic Charities of Indianapolis, IN; Catholic Charities of Los Angeles, CA; Catholic Services of Syracuse, NY; and Catholic Charities of Worcester, MA.  Each local affiliate received a sub-grant of $112,500.

The funder required CLINIC to conduct a formal program evaluation analyzing the effectiveness of the capacity building and technical assistance activities and the gains achieved by the local affiliate agencies, and to write a final evaluation report at the project’s conclusion.  The final evaluation noted that all four of CLINIC’s local affiliate agencies are now authorized to provide immigration legal services (two obtained BIA recognition and two were already recognized), and all are staffed by BIA accredited representatives. Through this project, CLINIC helped 12 staff at three agencies to obtain accreditation (three applications are still pending but are expected to be approved shortly).  All four programs now have well-developed, sustainable citizenship education and legal programs as anticipated under this grant. These educational and legal services meet the benchmarks identified by CLINIC for quality and professionalism.

CLINIC’s local affiliate agencies provided citizenship education services to 952 students (86% of their collective goal of 1,110 students) and prepared and submitted 1,288 citizenship applications (125% of their collective goal of 1,030 applications).  To date, 873 LPRs have successfully naturalized under this project, and the overall pass rate across all four sites on the citizenship test was 94%. Collectively, the project served LPRs from more than 50 countries, with the highest numbers from Mexico, Burma, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Liberia. Many of the clients served by this project were refugees or immigrants who have special challenges in the naturalization process such as low income or low levels of literacy and formal education.

CLINIC greatly appreciates the Office of Citizenship’s generous support for this project.  We hope to have more opportunities in the future to do naturalization capacity building work and to apply the promising practices and lessons learned in this project.

 

Resources by type: 
Laura Burdick

CLINIC's National Capacity Building Project, funded by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Office of Citizenship, has provided technical assistance and funding to four local affiliate agencies to establish new programs in English as a Second Language (ESL)/citizenship education and/or naturalization application assistance.

Partnership Toolkit

Partnerships are a valuable tool for any organization looking to expand or strengthen services in the community. In a well-functioning partnership, all members contribute ideas to the group, coordinate dates and events so that all can participate, and mutually benefit from the partnership. There are several ways to establish a partnership and many tools to use that can help organize and manage the operations.  This toolkit includes sample materials for managing a partnership, guidelines for working within a partnership, and tips on what to look for in a potential partner.

 

Please contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org if you have any questions or comments about this toolkit.

 

Download this Toolkit!

 

 

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Introduction to Immigration Law Practice: A Course for New Practitioners

Co-Sponsored by

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC),

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Atlanta, Inc.

and

Latin American Association

 

March 13-14, 2014

8:45 a.m. - 5:15 p.m. – Day One

8:45 a.m. – 4:45p.m. – Day Two

 

 Location:

Blackburn Conference Center

John Marshall Law School

1405 Spring St.

Atlanta, GA 30309

(404) 872-3593

 

Application for Georgia CLE Credit Pending*

 

$235 per person from CLINIC affiliate programs; $705 cap ($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

 

Register Here

 

Continental breakfast included.  Lunch is on your own.

This two-day training provides the new immigration practitioner with an overview of immigration law concepts and the practice skills necessary to be an effective advocate. Through large group presentations, skits, and small group exercises, participants learn about rights and remedies under immigration law, the functions of the different government agencies that carry out immigration law,and the fundamentals of interviewing clients, preparing applications, and staying up-to-date on the law.  Topics covered include the family-based petition process, adjustment of status, consular processing, inadmissibility and deportability concepts and select grounds, naturalization and BIA accreditation.  The trainers for this program are CLINIC attorneys Tatyana Delgado, Ilissa Mira and Susan Schreiber.

The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at 202-635-2649 to the attention of Jonathan Cochrane-Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number. Payment is by credit card only.  

Note that this is an interactive training with several small group exercises included in the curriculum. Prior to the training, participants will receive an email with some short reading and worksheet assignments to be completed before the training starts. Participants will also have a homework assignment to complete for day two of the training.

Space is limited to 50 participants. The deadline for registration is March 12th or sooner if registration is filled.  For registration information contact Jonathan Cochrane-Braswell at jcbraswell@cliniclegal.org. For the agenda and additional information, click here.

 

Training Site: The John Marshall Law School is located in downtown Atlanta.  For driving directions, check the Law School website at http://www.johnmarshall.edu/about/atlanta-living/.  If you are using public transportation, take the MARTA to the Arts Center Station.    

Hotel Reservations:

There are a number of hotels within a mile of the training site, including the following:  

  • Artmore Hotel, 1302 W. Peachtree St. NW (404-876-6100) (.3 miles)
  • Residence Inn - Atlanta Midtown,  1365 W. Peachtree St. NW (404-522-0950) (.4 miles)
  • Marriot Atlanta Midtown Suites, 35 14th St. NE (404 -876-8888) (.6 miles)
  • Hyatt Atlanta Midtown, 125 10th Street NE (404-443-1234) (1 mile)

 

You can contact these or other hotels directly or look for reduced rates on travel websites. 

 

*Georgia attorneys seeking CLE credit will be charged $5.00 per credit hour payable to CLINIC, which CLINIC will then pay to the State Bar

 

Register Here

 

Training Category: 
Training Location: 
Permissions: 

Immigration Law Training Introduction to Immigration Law Practice: A Course for New Practitioners

Co-Sponsored by

Catholic Charities of Dallas, Immigration and Legal Services Program

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

 

October 22-23, 2014

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.  – Day One

9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. – Day Two

 

Location:

Catholic Charities of Dallas

1st Floor Conference Room

9461 LBJ Freeway (Hwy 635)
Dallas, Texas 75243
214-634-7182 x228

 

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

 

Continental breakfast included.  Lunch is on your own.

 

Register Here

 

This two-day training provides the new immigration practitioner with an overview of immigration law concepts and the practice skills necessary to be an effective advocate. Through large group presentations and small group exercises, participants learn about rights and remedies under immigration law, the functions of the different government agencies that carry out immigration law, and the fundamentals of interviewing clients, preparing applications, and staying up-to-date on the law.  Topics covered include the family-based petition process, adjustment of status, consular processing, inadmissibility and deportability concepts and selected grounds, naturalization and BIA recognition and accreditation.  The trainers for this program are CLINIC attorneys Charles Wheeler and Debbie Smith.

The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal  staff of private law offices.  If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of you IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (301) 565-4824 to the attention of Jon Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number. Payment is by credit card only. 

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00

 

Space is limited to 60 participants. The deadline for registration is October 15, 2014 or sooner if registration is filled. For registration information contact Dinah Suncin at: dsuncin@cliniclegal.org.

 

Training Location and Parking: Catholic Charities is located on the northeast corner of intersection of the LBJ Freeway (Hwy 635) and Abrams Road.  The office is in the Northcreek Place office park, across the parking lot from the Chase Bank building.  Free parking is available anywhere in the office complex parking lot. 

 

Lodging Information:

A block of rooms has been reserved at the rate of $95 plus tax at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites Dallas Park Central, 9089 Vantage Point Drive, Dallas, TX  75243.  This rate is valid to September 30, 2014.

 For reservations, call the hotel at 972-889-9972, and ask for the “CLINIC” rate of $95.

 

Register Here

Training Category: 
Training Location: 
Permissions: 

Selected Issues in Immigration Program Management

 Sponsored by

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

 

September 17 and 18, 2014

8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

 

Location:

CLINIC

8757 Georgia Avenue, Ste. 850

Silver Spring, MD 20910

 

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

 

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes

or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

 

Continental breakfast provided.

Register Here

 

This content rich, two-day training is focused on strategic program management and capacity development topics. The curriculum will include planning for "on the horizon" issues such as possible administrative relief reforms by The White House, comprehensive immigration reform, DACA along with elements of CLINIC's highly praised Immigration Program Management training, expanded for more advanced learning opportunities.  The training will draw from these advanced areas:

► Leadership cultivation skills to build greater internal and external support for program planning and expansion.

►Case management policies, procedures, and forms. Participants will be asked to bring their case management forms to the training for a thorough review of forms in use and assess them against best practices. Attention will be given to developing policies and procedures that can create more professionalism and efficiencies.

►Technology uses for greater marketing, client contact, case management and evaluation including: social media; web-based client interaction tools; and integrated management and legal representation data bases.

►Staffing opportunities, supervision responsibilities and sub-office management. 

►Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness.  Participants will learn what data can be collected, analyzed and marketed to compel stakeholders to provide ongoing support for immigration legal services.

►Group application workshop models with consideration of current uses in addition to prospective use for unexpected changes in immigration law or policy.

►Open forum for participants to raise issues, ask questions and share good practices that are replicable.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

 

The training will be presented by Jeanne Atkinson, CLINIC's Executive Director, Jeff Chenoweth, Director of CLINIC's Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities, Michelle Sardone, CLINIC's Legalization Program Manager & BIA Full Accredited Representative, Laura Burdick, Leya Speasmaker, and Nathaly Perez, CLINIC Field Support Coordinators, and Rommel Calderwood, Project Coordinator.

 

 

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (301) 565-4824 to the attention of Jon Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

This training is expected to fill up quickly.  Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is September 10, 2014 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Leya Speasmaker at 301-565-4816 or lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

 Register Here

Training Category: 

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Other Selected Issues in Program Management

 

Sponsored by

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) and Catholic Charities of Portland

 

April 3 and 4, 2014

8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

 

Location:

Catholic Charities of Portland

2740 SE Powell Blvd. #2

Portland, OR 97202

 

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

 

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes

or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

 

Continental breakfast provided.

Register Here

 

This two-day training is focused on strategic program management and capacity development topics. The curriculum will include planning activities for comprehensive immigration reform along with elements of CLINIC’s highly praised Immigration Program Management training, extended for more advanced learning opportunities.  The training will draw from these advanced areas:

►Planning in advance for implementing comprehensive immigration reform. Participants will be asked to analyze how they plan to respond to a sharp increase in demand of clients applying for immigration benefits after the passage of new legislation. Discussion will also include how to prepare leadership, funders, and the community for changes in service provision and the need for additional support and resources.

►Case management policies, procedures, and forms. Participants will be asked to bring their case management forms to the training for a thorough review of forms in use and assess them against best practices. Attention will be given to developing policies and procedures that can accommodate a higher client demand sure to come after comprehensive immigration law is passed.

►Program management challenges and ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will learn from actual and hypothetical cases and share their own experiences. 

►Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness.  Participants will learn a logic model and apply it to designing a project and spotlighting outcomes which are attractive to many funders. Participants will also learn how to use the likelihood of new legislation in funding proposals, community events, and other marketing arenas to garner additional support for the immigration program.

►Group application workshop models with consideration of current uses in addition to prospective use for unexpected changes in immigration law or policy. Each participant will practice the workshop model and create a workshop plan for her or his program.

►Open forum for participants to raise issues, ask questions and share good practices that are replicable.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

The training will be presented by Jack Holmgren, California Legalization Director, and Martin Gauto, Field Support Coordinator.

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (301) 565-4824 to the attention of Jon Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

This training is expected to fill up quickly.  Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is March 27, 2014 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Leya Speasmaker at 301-565-4816 or lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

 

Register Here

 

Training Category: 
Training Location: 
Permissions: 

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Other Selected Issues in Program Management

Sponsored by

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) and CUNY Citizenship NOW!

 

May 20 and 21, 2014

8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

 

Location:

City University of New York

Graduate Center

365 5th Avenue

New York, NY 10016 (at 34th Street)

Room C197

 

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

 

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes

or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

 

Continental breakfast provided.

Register Here

 

This two-day training is focused on strategic program management and capacity development topics. The curriculum will include planning activities for comprehensive immigration reform along with elements of CLINIC’s highly praised Immigration Program Management training, extended for more advanced learning opportunities.  The training will draw from these advanced areas:

►Planning in advance for implementing Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR). Participants will focus on:

  • Needs assessment and special, under-served populations;
  • Leadership and stakeholder cultivation for decision making and support;
  • Staffing and volunteer roles;
  • Infrastructure and technology needs;
  • Partnerships for maximum service coverage and complimentary systems; and
  • Creating CIR implementation into a short and long-term immigrant integration initiative locally and nationally. 

Special attention will be given to multiple service delivery models that can be managed concurrently to serve large numbers of people appropriately.  A hands-on “Preparing for CIR Passage Day” exercise will be offered, time permitting, CLINIC will present highlights from 25 comprehensive immigration reform plans created by selected nonprofits in its network of over 250 affiliates.

►Sharing best practices on DACA renewal models and looping DACA renewals into building a potential client base for CIR.

►Case management policies, procedures, and forms. Participants will be asked to bring their case management forms to the training for a thorough review of forms in use and assess them against best practices. Attention will be given to developing policies and procedures that can accommodate a higher client demand sure to come after comprehensive immigration law is passed. Expert practitioners will share how they generate and analyze more data using their electronic case management system.

►Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness.  Participants will learn new and improved ways of spotlighting and story-telling program and client-service outcomes which are attractive to many funders. 

Open forum for participants to raise issues, ask questions and share good practices that are replicable.

Training topics are subject to change given extenuating circumstances. The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

The training will be presented by Jeff Chenoweth, Director of CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities, Silvana Arista, CLINIC Project Attorney and Laura Burdick and Nathaly Perez, CLINIC Field Support Coordinators, in addition to local speakers. 

 

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (301) 565-4824 to the attention of Jon Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

This training is expected to fill up quickly.  Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is May 13, 2014 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Jeff Chenoweth at 301-565-4814 or jchenoweth@cliniclegal.org.

 

Register Here

Training Category: 
Training Location: 
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Immigration Program Management Training

Sponsored by

The California Community Foundation

 

February 10 and 11, 2014

8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

 

Location:

The California Community Foundation

Joan Palevsky Convening Center

281 S. Figueroa St., ground floor

Los Angeles, CA 90012

 

 

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

 

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

 

Register Here

 

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes

or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

This two-day training provides an overview of how to start and sustain a nonprofit immigration legal services program. It features a manual and curriculum that offers detailed information and suggestions for applying for Board of Immigration Appeals agency recognition and staff accreditation, implementing effective case management systems, fundraising and other topics related to managing an immigration program. Participants will learn how to determine which applications to accept and how to adjust fees to obtain the best support for their program. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.  Participants will leave with a plan to create or improve immigration legal services.  The training will be presented by Jack Holmgren, Attorney and California Legalization Director and Martin Gauto, Attorney and Field Support Coordinator with CLINIC’s Capacity Building Section.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

 

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (301) 565-4824 to the attention of Jon Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

 

Register Here

 

This training is expected to fill up quickly.  Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is January 29, 2014 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Martin Gauto at 213-251-3572 or mgauto@cliniclegal.org.

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Immigration Program Management Training

Sponsored by

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) and the Diocese of Orlando


January 30 and 31, 2014

8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One

9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

 

Location:

Orlando Chancery Office

50 E. Robinson St.

 Orlando, FL 32801

 

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap

($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

Register Here

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes

or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

 

Continental breakfast provided.

 

This two-day training is focused on strategic program management and capacity development topics. The curriculum will include planning activities for comprehensive immigration reform along with elements of CLINIC’s highly praised Immigration Program Management training, extended for more advanced learning opportunities.  The training will draw from these advanced areas:

►Planning in advance for implementing comprehensive immigration reform. Participants will be asked to analyze how they plan to respond to a sharp increase in demand of clients applying for immigration benefits after the passage of new legislation. Discussion will also include how to prepare leadership, funders, and the community for changes in service provision and the need for additional support and resources.

►Case management policies, procedures, and forms. Participants will be asked to bring their case management forms to the training for a thorough review of forms in use and assess them against best practices. Attention will be given to developing policies and procedures that can accommodate a higher client demand sure to come after comprehensive immigration law is passed.

►Program management challenges and ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will learn from actual and hypothetical cases and share their own experiences. 

►Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness.  Participants will learn a logic model and apply it to designing a project and spotlighting outcomes which are attractive to many funders. Participants will also learn how to use the likelihood of new legislation in funding proposals, community events, and other marketing arenas to garner additional support for the immigration program.

►Group application workshop models with consideration of current uses in addition to prospective use for unexpected changes in immigration law or policy. Each participant will practice the workshop model and create a workshop plan for her or his program.

►Open forum for participants to raise issues, ask questions and share good practices that are replicable.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

 

The training will be presented by Michelle Sardone, CLINIC’s Legalization Director, Leya Speasmaker, CLINIC’s Field Support Coordinator, and Silvana Arista, CLINIC’s Project Director. 

 

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (301) 565-4824 to the attention of Jon Braswell. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

 

Register Here

 

This training is expected to fill up quickly.  Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is January 23, 2014 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Leya Speasmaker at 301-565-4816 or lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

Training Category: 
Training Location: 
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Asylee Eligibility for Resettlement Assistance Guide

This guide is designed to give service providers the tools and information needed to address the barriers to resettlement and integration faced by asylees and to better assist their clients.  It contains crucial and timely information about the benefits and services for which asylees are eligible, including job placement assistance, English language classes, health screening, temporary cash and medical assistance, social security cards, employment authorization cards, adjustment of status, I-94s, travel authorization, petitioning for immediate relatives, and federal student financial aid.

 

To download the full guide - CLICK HERE

Webinar: CLINIC's National Naturalization Radio Campaign

CLINIC is launching its first, national naturalization radio campaign in Spanish.  It will be aired in up to 250 Spanish radio outlets. The public service announcement (PSA) will be released four times across a Spanish radio network.  As such, CLINIC offers this brief webinar to help affiliates (members and subscribers) prepare a response to an increase in naturalization inquiries caused by the campaign aired in your community.

CLINIC is experimenting with this large-scale PSA format to: 1) increase interest in naturalization among the LPR community; 2) increase the visibility of CLINIC’s national network of affiliates; and 3) serve as a test-case for future PSAs addressing comprehensive immigration reform if a bill passes into law. 

 

Click here to access and listen to the audio file of the radio PSA 

(To download a copy of this PSA, right click the link above and select "Save Link As")

 

 

Held on 11/4/13

Presenters:

Jeff Chenoweth (Capacity Building Section Director)

Rommel Calderwood (Project Coordinator)

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Creating a Workplace ELL Program

Low English language proficiency impacts employee productivity, safety, and retention. Federal and state governments provide only a fraction of the funding needed for English language classes, and businesses have both the space and the financial means to offer this benefit to their Limited English Proficient workers. CLINIC offers the following resource to programs interested in pursuing partnerships with local employers willing to offer English language classes to their employees.  The Creating a Workplace ELL Program toolkit includes program planning documents, examples of currently operating workplace ELL programs, sample marketing materials, and other resources to assist in implementing a workplace ELL program. 

 

Also see CLINIC’s Creating a Citizenship Preparation Program for information on implementing a legal and language program in-house.

Click on the chapters below to read sections of the Creating a Workplace ELL Program or click here for the entire document.

Program Planning

I.    The Need for Workplace ELL
II.    Benefits of Workplace English Language Training
III.    Program Needs for Workplace ELL Programs
IV.    Planning for your Workplace ELL Program
V.    Sample Workplace ELL Program Model
VI.    Examples of Workplace ELL Programs

Planning for your Workplace ELL ProgramsTools and Other Materials

VII.    Tips for Approaching an Employer (RefugeeWorks)
VIII.   Tackling Employer Concerns (RefugeeWorks)
IX.      Sample Cover Letter to a Prospective Employer
X.       Workplace ELL Program Survey for Teachers
XI.      Workplace ELL Program Survey for Employers
XII.     Workplace ELL Resources (USCIS and others)
XIII.    Workplace ELL Sample Materials

Questions? Contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

Resources by type: 

Asylee Information

In recent years, more than 24,000 people from over 100 nations have been granted asylum in the United States. Asylees have often suffered from persecution in their country of origin, forced migration, detention in the United States, and the uncertainty of the asylum adjudication process. Most confront systemic and bureaucratic barriers to resettlement and integration, and need well-coordinated and prompt social services to ease their transition.

CLINIC's National Asylee Information and Referral Line, which operated for 11 years, from 2001 to 2012, referred asylees to more than 500 local providers of resettlement services such as English language classes, job placement assistance, temporary cash assistance, and medical assistance. Funded by the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) and operated by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, the referral line provided a single, centralized source of accurate information about service eligibility and programs across the country that assist asylees with the resources they need for a smooth adjustment and early self-sufficiency.  Referral line counselors spoke 18 languages, including English, Spanish, Haitian-Creole, Chinese, French, Russian, and Arabic.

Over its 11 year history, the referral line project:

  • Provided one-on-one help to over 39,000 asylees (about 300 per month).
  • Created and maintained an up-to-date referral database (the first of its kind) of more than 500 local refugee service providers throughout the U.S.
  • Placed outreach information in the regional USCIS asylum offices and improved outreach to asylees in the immigration courts.
  • Created an informational guide to assist service providers who work with asylees. The guide contains information about the benefits and services for which asylees are eligible, including temporary cash and medical assistance, employment assistance, English classes, employment authorization, Social Security cards, I-94s, adjustment of status, travel authorization, change of address, family reunification, and federal student financial aid.


*** PLEASE NOTE THAT THE 1-800 NUMBER IS NO LONGER IN OPERATION.  ASYLEES SEEKING INFORMATION SHOULD VISIT THE ORR WEBPAGE

 

RESOURCES

Benefits & Services

CLINIC guide, Asylee Eligibility for Resettlement Assistance 

ORR outreach flyer for asylees (available in 9 languages)

USCIS fee waiver application, Form I-912

USCIS policy guidance on fee waivers, March 2011

USCIS fact sheet on asylee travel

 

General Information

DHS Office of Immigration Statistics 2012 annual flow report on refugees and asylees

Executive Office for Immigration Review asylum statistics

USCIS asylum page

ORR policy memoranda on asylees

 

For more information about this project, please contact Laura Burdick at lburdick@cliniclegal.org.

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Hands-On Mega Group Application Workshop Training

Hands-On Mega Group Application Workshop Training

 Sponsored by:
The New Americans Campaign

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC),

Immigration Advocates Network, and

NALEO Educational Fund

Saturday, November 16, 2013

8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Preceding the 6th Annual National Immigrant Integration Conference

Location:
Hilton Miami Downtown
1601 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, FL 33132

(305) 374-0000

$100 per person from CLINIC affiliates
 $125 per person from other nonprofit agency staff

 $210 per person for private attorneys and staff

Agenda

Includes materials, continental breakfast, lunch and snacks 

This one-day, hands-on training gives immigrant advocates, community-based organizers and legal service providers the knowledge of planning and implementing a large "mega" group application workshop serving 250 or more people for naturalization, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and future comprehensive immigration reform.  CLINIC invites staff of affiliates and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices to attend.

 This training will be highly interactive with minimal lecturing.  Participants will be immersed in the following discussion topics and exercises:

  • The naturalization group application workshop model and stages

  • Training resources

  • Media outreach, planning and organizing

  • How to increase efficiency by using  technology such as CitizenshipWorks and CLINIC's self-directed e-learning course on naturalization 

  • Workshop set-up

  • Red flags relevant to DACA and naturalization

  • Hypothetical situations

  • Best practices and strategies

  • Creating a workshop plan of action for local implementation

  • Future considerations for comprehensive immigration reform

The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal  staff of private law offices.   If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of you IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at 301-565-4824 or rcalderwood@cliniclegal.org  to the attention of Rommel Calderwood. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number. Payment is by credit card only. 

Space is limited to 50 participants. Please be sure to register by November 13 under the correct category and for the correct training.  All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of your payment through the website by credit card only.  No checks or cash accepted for payment.

See below for information about local travel and hotel options.  Questions may be sent to Rommel Calderwood at rcalderwood@cliniclegal.org or (301) 565-4826.

Logistics:  The nearest airports to the training site are Miami International Airport (7 miles) and Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in Broward County (24 miles).

SuperShuttle services Miami Downtown.  Other transportation options from these airports include Miami-Dade Metro Transit, car rental or taxi.  

Hotel Options:  The following hotels are near the training site, and attendees should make their own reservations for accommodation.

Hilton Miami Downtown (location of the training)
($206 per night; Group rate will apply for National Immigrant Integration Conference attendees)
1601 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, FL 33132

DoubleTree by Hilton Grand Hotel Biscayne Bay
($189 per night; 0.3 mile from training site)
1717 North Bayshore Drive
Miami, FL, 33132

Spring Hill Suites Miami Airport East/Medical Center
($169 per night; 1.5 mile from training site)
1311 NW 10th Avenue
Miami, FL 33136

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 

Volunteer Management Toolkit

Many tasks in an immigration legal services program can be completed by volunteers. Using volunteers when possible frees up staff time that can be devoted to offering more services to clients. This toolkit contains helpful information on how best to use volunteers in your program, how to recruit and retain volunteers, and how to incorporate them into your program’s plan for the passage of Comprehensive Immigration Reform. Sample forms are included as well as sample volunteer job descriptions.

If you have questions regarding this toolkit, please send these to Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org

 

Overview of Volunteer Management

10 Reasons to Use Volunteers for Charitable Immigration Legal Services

10 Considerations When Working with Volunteers

Best Practices for Volunteer Management

The Case for Hiring a Volunteer Manager

 

Needs Assessment: Determining Agency Volunteer Roles

What Volunteers Can and Can’t Do in Legal Work

10 Tasks for a Volunteer in Your Legal Office

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Summer Legal Intern)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Legal Intern)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Naturalization Tutor)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Civics-Based ESL and Citizenship Instructor )

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Pro Bono Attorney)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Workshop Volunteer)

 

Recruitment, Matching and Screening 

Where to Find Volunteers

Sample Volunteer Application and Acknowledgement Form

Sample Volunteer Confidentiality Agreement

 

Training and BIA Accreditation

Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Accreditation for Volunteers

Training Opportunities for Prospective BIA Applicants

 

Superivision and Motivation

Giving Feedback to Volunteers

Managing a Difficult Volunteer

Sample Evaluation of Volunteers

How to Recognize and Appreciate Volunteers

 

Tools for Effective Volunteer Management

Technology Tools for Volunteer Work

Resources for Future Exploration

 

Pro Bono Specific Resources

CLINIC Webinar Using Pro Bono to Maximize Resources

CLINIC Webinar Pro Bono Development

CLINIC Webinar Partnering with Law Schools

Sample Guidelines for Pro Bono Representation (Courtesy of Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project)

Sample Pro Bono Attorney Guidelines (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center)

Sample Pro Bono Retainer Agreement (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center) 

Sample Pro Bono Case Summary (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center)  

Sample Pro Bono Project Newsletter (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center)  

Other Pro Bono Resources

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World Relief and the Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLINIC) co-hosted an exciting conference entitled “Building Legal Immigration Services Capacity Through National Networks and their Affiliates” at the World Relief home office in Baltimore on April 3 and 4, 2013.

All About Fee Waivers

This webinar training focuses on how to obtain a fee waiver for a naturalization applicant who is unable to pay the USCIS application fee. We discuss the fee waiver eligibility criteria, the application process with the Form I-912, and the documentation requirements. We also discuss problems or pitfalls that may arise and how to avoid these, as well as special considerations for completing fee waiver applications at naturalization group processing workshops.

Click here for the presentation slides.

Held on March 7, 2013.

Resources by type: 

CIR Planning & Preparation: Budgeting and Resource Development

Early planning and preparation for CIR implementation includes budgeting and resource development.  This webinar introduces resources to help CLINIC affiliates in these processes.  Included in the webinar is a newly-released CIR Preparation Checklist for program directors to guide their planning, webinar slides on budgeting decisions and several resource development tools including a proposal template, budget narrative and work plan to seek external funding.

 

Back to CLINIC's CIR Resource Page

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BIA Recognition and Accreditation for Start-up and Expanding Programs

Join us for CLINIC’s kick-off webinar for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) preparation in 2013, the first in a series. This free webinar training covers the application process and requirements for Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) recognition and accreditation. We also discuss the latest BIA developments, including the new FAQ sheet released by the BIA, training requirements for staff, and issues the BIA is analyzing before submitting proposed changes to recognition and accreditation regulations. BIA agency recognition and staff accreditation is the Department of Justice’s certification of nonprofit legal immigration programs and their staff. It allows non-attorneys to practice immigration law as authorized representatives. Increasing the number of BIA recognized agencies, locations, and accredited staff will be essential for implementing CIR and bringing legal services to the millions of immigrants who will be eligible for relief. This webinar is presented by CLINIC Attorneys Silvana Arista and Sarah Bronstein and CLINIC Field Support Coordinator Laura Burdick. For questions, please contact Laura Burdick at lburdick@cliniclegal.org.

Click here for the presentation slides.

Resources by type: 

Preparation Checklist for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR)

Back to CLINIC's CIR Resource Page

 

This initial checklist can be used to start preparing your program for CIR.  The action items are divided into categories of leadership, infrastructure, BIA recognition and accreditation, financial, community education, partnerships, and volunteers.  This resource will help your program organize and assign tasks as you get ready for CIR.

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Templates for CIR Fundraising

Back to CLINIC's CIR Resource Page

 

Proposal Narrative - This document is designed to provide you with a template that can be used when applying for immigration funding, specifically in preparing your local community for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR).  It outlines the Need and Approach to position your agency as the lead in preparing your community for CIR.  Objectives and outcomes are included along with guidelines for an organizational capability statement.  The appendix contains useful resources.

Work Plan - This is an Excel sheet that details the activities and a timeline associated with the objectives in the proposal narrative.

Budget Narrative -  Set up as a Word document, this narrative details the personnel and non-personnel costs to consider as you develop your plan and write your proposal.

Resources by type: 

BIA Recognition and Accreditation for Start-up and Expanding Programs

BIA Recognition and Accreditation for Start-up and Expanding Programs

Wednesday, March 20, 2013
2:00 PM - 3:30 PM EDT
Free

Join us for CLINIC’s kick-off webinar for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) preparation in 2013, the first in a series. This free webinar training will cover the application process and requirements for Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) recognition and accreditation. We will also discuss the latest BIA developments, including the new FAQ sheet released by the BIA, training requirements for staff, and issues the BIA is analyzing before submitting proposed changes to recognition and accreditation regulations. BIA agency recognition and staff accreditation is the Department of Justice’s certification of nonprofit legal immigration programs and their staff. It allows non-attorneys to practice immigration law as authorized representatives. Increasing the number of BIA recognized agencies, locations, and accredited staff will be essential for implementing CIR and bringing legal services to the millions of immigrants who will be eligible for relief. This webinar will be presented by CLINIC Attorneys Silvana Arista and Sarah Bronstein and CLINIC Field Support Coordinator Laura Burdick. For questions, please contact Laura Burdick at lburdick@cliniclegal.org.

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 

DACA Evaluation: Beyond the Numbers

January 23, 2013

Now that your agency has assisted numerous clients in receiving their DACA approval, it is time to step back and evaluate the success of your agency’s response.  Was your program ready for DACA?  Do you have the data to justify the support you have received?  What have you learned?  How has your program grown?  Will you be ready for the next change in immigration law or policy?  Join CLINIC’s capacity building staff to learn about strategies for data collection, program evaluation, and documenting outputs and outcomes.  We will also cover how to use information from your DACA program evaluation to plan and prepare for comprehensive immigration reform.

Please note that audio begins at minute 2:40 of the recording.

Resources by type: 

The New Unlawful Presence Waiver Adjudication Process: Uniting Families Safely and Boosting Naturalization

The New Unlawful Presence Waiver Adjudication Process: Uniting Families Safely and Boosting Naturalization

Monday, February 25, 2013 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM EST

Free and open to the public.

The USCIS will start accepting provisional waivers for unlawful presence on March 4.  This new procedure can help your program promote naturalization as well as family-based immigration.  More clients will want to file I-130 petitions and initiate consular processing if they can file the unlawful presence in the United States and wait here for a decision. Clients will be turning to your program to help them file the waiver.  More clients will be motivated to naturalize if it will convert their spouse to an immediate relative.  In this webinar we will cover eligibility for the provisional waiver as well as how your program can gain the maximum advantage for your clients. Join CLINIC staff members  Jack Holmgren and Charles Wheeler as they discuss both the substance of the law and how to prepare for an increase in demand for services. Contact Jack Holmgren at jholmgren@cliniclegal.org with questions.

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 

DACA Evaluation: Beyond the Numbers

DACA Evaluation: Beyond the Numbers

January, 23, 2013

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time
Cost: Free

Now that your agency has assisted numerous clients in receiving their DACA approval, it is time to step back and evaluate the success of your agency’s response.  Was your program ready for DACA?  Do you have the data to justify the support you have received?  What have you learned?  How has your program grown?  Will you be ready for the next change in immigration law or policy?  Join CLINIC’s capacity building staff to learn about strategies for data collection, program evaluation, and documenting outputs and outcomes.  We will also cover how to use information from your DACA program evaluation to plan and prepare for comprehensive immigration reform.

Register by clicking here. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.  Please contact Michelle Sardone (msardone@cliniclegal.org) with any questions.

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Other Selected Issues in Program Management

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Other Selected Issues in Program Management  

Sponsored by

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

October 24 - 25, 2013

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Day One

9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Day Two

Location:

CLINIC's new office

8757 Georgia Avenue, Ste. 850

Silver Spring, MD 20910

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)
$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)
$390 per person for private attorneys and staff
Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.
Continental breakfast provided.
Hotel available next door to CLINIC’s training room.
Cancellations for hotel required by October 9


This newly developed training is focused on methods to plan and implement Comprehensive Immigration Reform, specifically Registered Provisional Immigrant status as currently passed in Senate Bill 744. The curriculum includes a CIR Planning Checklist and Outline that attendees can use for their own community-level planning. The training will draw from these advanced areas:

►Presenting up-to-date data on the undocumented by residence by city, length of residence, nationality, age, income level, and education level completed.  Data will be studied with application towards service delivery opportunities and challenges.

►Identifying how to acquire more leadership and stakeholder support for planning and resource development.  Discussion will include different definitions of successful CIR implementation based on local realities and revenue raising options to achieve success. 

►Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness. Participants will learn a logic model and apply it to designing a project and spotlighting outcomes which are attractive to many funders. Participants will also learn how to use the likelihood of new legislation in funding proposals, community events, and other marketing arenas to garner additional support for the immigration program.

► Learning human resource models and infrastructure needs to build-up service delivery capacity and efficiency. A short presentation will be given on Board of Immigration Appeals agency recognition and staff and volunteer accreditation.

► Evaluating technology enhancements including client and program databases.  Discussion will include how web-based databases can serve more people efficiently, increase staff efficiency and tell successful stories about outcomes.

►Community education messages tailored for each phase of CIR from pre-passage, registration, adjustment of status, and naturalization spanning a decade or more.  The role of partnerships in community education and other service delivery needs will be addressed.

►Service delivery diagrams will be presented to show how different charitable immigration legal programs have already drafted service delivery models for implementing CIR.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship). The training will be presented by: Jeff Chenoweth, Director of CLINIC's Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities; Michelle Sardone, CLINIC's Legalization Program Manager & BIA Full Accredited Representative; and Laura Burdick and Leya Speasmaker, CLINIC Field Support Coordinators; Silvana Arista, Project Attorney; and Rommel Calderwood, CLINIC Project Coordinator

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices. If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (202) 635-2649 to the attention of Andrés Abella. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter. If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number. Payment is by credit card only.


This training is expected to fill up quickly. Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is October 10, 2013 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Leya Speasmaker at 202-756-3753 or lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

 

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Immigration Program Management Training

Immigration Program Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

Hosted by

Catholic Charities of Central Texas

February 28 – March 1, 2013
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

Location:
Catholic Charities of Central Texas
1625 Rutherford Lane
Austin, TX 78754

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

Continental breakfast provided.

This two-day training provides a complete overview of how to start and sustain a nonprofit immigration legal services program. It features a manual and curriculum that offers detailed information and suggestions for applying for Board of Immigration Appeals agency recognition and staff accreditation, implementing effective case management systems, fundraising and scores of other pertinent topics related to managing an immigration program. 

This training is continuously updated to reflect recent laws such as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and the new provisional unlawful presence waiver.  It will help you to prepare for even bigger changes such as Comprehensive Immigration Reform, AgJOBS, and DREAM Act.

Participants will learn how to determine which applications to accept and how to adjust fees to obtain the best support for their program. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is highly interactive. Participants will leave with a plan to create or improve immigration legal services. Past participants have used information from this training to build or expand their legal immigration capacity.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

The training will be presented by Michelle Sardone, BIA Fully Accredited Representative, Jack Holmgren, Attorney, and Laura Burdick, Field Support Coordinator, all of whom work at CLINIC’S Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities as Field Support Coordinators. 

 Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (202) 635-2649 to the attention of Andrés Abella. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training.  All registration changes, cancellations or disenrollments are subject to an administrative charge of $70.  Please note that CLINIC can only issue refunds for an e-learning course until one week prior to the first day of the training.”

Space is limited to 30 participants. The registration deadline is February 15, 2013 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Michelle Sardone at (202) 756-5503.

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Other Selected Issues in Program Management

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Other Selected Issues in Program Management

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

Hosted by
Catholic Charities CYO San Francisco

September 17 – September 18, 2013
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Day Two

Location:
Catholic Charities CYO San Francisco
180 Howard Street, Suite 100
San Francisco, CA 94105-1696
(415) 972-1200

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00. 

Continental breakfast provided.

This two-day training is focused on strategic program management and capacity development topics. The curriculum will include planning activities for comprehensive immigration reform along with elements of CLINIC’s highly praised Immigration Program Management training, extended for more advanced learning opportunities.  The training will draw from these advanced areas:

  • Planning in advance for implementing comprehensive immigration reform. Participants will be asked to analyze how they plan to respond to a sharp increase in demand of clients applying for immigration benefits after the passage of new legislation. Discussion will also include how to prepare leadership, funders, and the community for changes in service provision and the need for additional support and resources.
  • Case management policies, procedures, and forms. Participants will be asked to bring their case management forms to the training for a thorough review of forms in use and assess them against best practices. Attention will be given to developing policies and procedures that can accommodate a higher client demand sure to come after comprehensive immigration law is passed.
  • Program management challenges and ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will learn from actual and hypothetical cases and share their own experiences. 
  • Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness.  Participants will learn a logic model and apply it to designing a project and spotlighting outcomes which are attractive to many funders. Participants will also learn how to use the likelihood of new legislation in funding proposals, community events, and other marketing arenas to garner additional support for the immigration program.
  • Group application workshop models with consideration of current uses in addition to prospective use for unexpected changes in immigration law or policy. Each participant will practice the workshop model and create a workshop plan for her or his program.
  • Open forum for participants to raise issues, ask questions and share good practices that are replicable.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

The training will be presented by Jeff Chenoweth, Director of CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities, Michelle Sardone, CLINIC's Legalization Program Manager & BIA Full Accredited Representative and Jack Holmgren, Attorney and Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC’s Capacity Building Section. 

Registration: The training is for the staff of Catholic Charities, other Catholic nonprofits, and other community-based organization with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal staff of private law offices.  If you are not an affiliate and are registering as staff of a community-based organization, you must fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3)letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (202) 635-2649 to the attention of Andrés Abella. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter.  If you fail to submit your 501(c) (3) letter you can be disenrolled. If you are an attorney, please include your state bar number.  Payment is by credit card only.

This training is expected to fill up quickly.  Early registration is recommended. The registration deadline is August 31, 2013 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information contact Jack Holmgren at 415-394-8074 or jholmgren@cliniclegal.org.

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 
Training Location: 
Vaishalee Raja

November 13, 2012 – Los Angeles, CA - An unprecedented national network of more than 80 legal-service providers, businesses, faith-based organizations, community leaders and foundations has launched The New Americans Campaign, a nonpartisan project to modernize the system of naturalization assistance and to help more immigrants who are legal permanent residents become U.S. citizens. The campaign launches this week after a pilot phase; it focuses on cities across the country with large populations of citizenship-eligible residents.

DACA Emerging Best Practices - A Conversation between CLINIC and Affiliates

October 22, 2012
DACA Emerging Best Practices - A Conversation between CLINIC and Affiliates 
 

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time
Affiliates Only
Free

Join CLINIC's Capacity Building staff for a moderated discussion of affiliates on "real-time" DACA management and implementation issues.  This online meeting, as opposed to a teaching webinar, will give CLINIC affiliates an opportunity to speak to their peers about the many management questions and program modifications that have come up since DACA applications were first accepted on August 15th.


The purposes of the conversation are to: 1) identify challenges and strategies to overcome challenges as DACA implementation evolves over time; 2)  hear how some affiliates have been successful in gaining additional resources in money and staff from their parent organizations and external funders; 3) hear how immigration program directors are serving existing clients, adding DACA clients and contemplating future benefits like state-side processing of provisional unauthorized presence waivers; 4) plan for future surges in DACA applications.

If you have questions to pose or information to share during this online meeting, please contact your Field Support Coordinator so issues and presenters can be identified in advance.

 

REGISTER HERE

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.  For additional information contact Michelle Sardone at msardone@cliniclegal.org.

Training by type: 
Training Category: 

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers Management Training

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers: Maximizing Your Agency’s Effectiveness for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals; Pre-adjudication of Unlawful Presence Waivers; Increasing Naturalization; Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

Co-Sponsors
Catholic Charities of Central Florida

October 16th (Tuesday), 2012
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location:
Catholic Charities of Central Florida
1819 North Semoran Blvd.
Orlando, FL 32807

(407) 658-1818

$130 per person from affiliate agencies; $390 cap ($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$145 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $435 cap
($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$255 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

This one-day training is not about the law.  It is about what you and your program can do now to prepare for the biggest opportunities in immigration law in a quarter century.  We have a chance the like of which we have not seen since three million people obtained lawful status from the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA).  Participants will work in small groups to bring innovative and tested strategies and ideas to all as you create your Implementation Plan for DACA principally with a strategic assessment of how you can both reunite families while using the new Pre-adjudication of Unlawful Presence Waivers (PUPW) to boost naturalization demand.  You will leave with a road map to guide you through the intense months of implementation of the new changes.  All participants will receive a detailed DACA Implementation Plan Outline to complete during the training, a power point with the latest information on fees and strategies from the field, and a set of talking points to use when communicating the tremendous opportunities and challenges presented by the new procedures to foundations.

Earned income (fees) and their core importance to building sustainable programs that can continue to serve DREAMers will be covered. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies with a focus on Group Application Workshops for DREAMers and those applying to naturalize, using an army of volunteers, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, educational programs (ESL and Citizenship), and DREAM coalitions and student organizations.

The training will be presented by Michelle Sardone, BIA Fully Accredited Representative and Jack Holmgren. Sardone and Holmgren both work at CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities as Field Support Coordinators.

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax or scan a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 (fax)/jholmgren@cliniclegal.org (scan) to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 50 participants. The registration deadline is October 9, 2012 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information send an e-mail to Jack Holmgren at jholmgren@cliniclegal.org.

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Hands-On Mega Group Application Workshop Training combined with a Naturalization Workshop Event

Hands-On Mega Group Application Workshop Training
combined with a Naturalization Workshop Event
in Los Angeles, CA

Sponsored by:
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC),
Catholic Charities of Los Angeles, and
NALEO Educational Fund

Friday, November 16, 2012 (9am to 6pm) - training

Saturday, November 17, 2012 (time TBD) - naturalization workshop

Location:
Mid-Valley Regional Branch Library
16244 Nordhoff Street
North Hills, 91343
(818) 895-3650

$130 per person from CLINIC affiliates
$170 per person from other nonprofit agency staff
$210 per person for private attorneys and staff
Fees are for materials, continental breakfast and lunch

Please be sure to register by November 1 under the correct category and for the correct training.  CLINIC will cut-off registration when capacity is full. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of your payment through the website by credit card only.  No checks or cash accepted for payment.

The first of its kind, this two-day event combines one-day of hands-on training to give immigration legal staff the knowledge of planning and implementing a large "mega" group application workshop for naturalization and deferred action for childhood arrivals (DACA), and on the second day actual mega workshop experience serving an estimated number of 250 or more naturalization applicants.  CLINIC invites staff of affiliates and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices to attend.  Nonprofits should submit their IRS 501(c)(3) tax exempt letter to CLINIC (Attn: Rommel Calderwood) by fax at 202-635-2649 or email at rcalderwood@cliniclegal.org.  General questions may also be sent to Rommel Calderwood’s email address or his phone at (202) 756-5509.

This training will be highly interactive with minimal lecturing.  On the first day, participants will be immersed in the following discussion topics and exercises:

  • The naturalization group application workshop models and stages
  • Volunteer and staff training resources
  • Media outreach, planning and organizing
  • How to increase efficiency by using technology such as CitizenshipWorks and CLINIC's self-directed e-learning course on naturalization
  • Workshop set-up
  • Red flags relevant to DACA and naturalization
  • Hypothetical situations
  • Best practices and strategies
  • Creating a workshop plan of action for local implementation

On the second day, participants will be actively engaged in the actual mega workshop hosted by Catholic Charities of Los Angeles where trainees from around the country will join local immigration practitioners in helping hundreds of LPRs to reach their dream of citizenship.  You and your colleagues will manage the various stages of the workshop, guide applicants through the process and immigration forms, and provide subject matter expertise.  Through your efforts, hundreds of potentially eligible LPRs and their families will become Americans.

REGISTER HERE

Click here for information about local travel and hotel options arrangements. 

Training by type: 
Training Category: 
Training Location: 

"Mega" Group Application Workshop

The purpose of the webinar is to educate charitable immigration legal staff on the unique differences of planning and implementing a large, "mega" group application workshop for naturalization and deferred action.

Click here for the webinar slides.

Held on September 12, 2012.

Issues: 
Resources by type: 

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers Management Training

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers: Maximizing Your Agency’s Effectiveness for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals; Pre-adjudication of Unlawful Presence Waivers; Increasing Naturalization; Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

Co-Sponsors
Catholic Charities of Dallas

October 11th (Thursday), 2012
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location:
Catholic Charities
9461 LBJ Freeway, Suite 100
Dallas, TX  75243
T – (214) 520-6590

$130 per person from affiliate agencies; $390 cap ($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)


$145 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $435 cap
($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$255 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

This one-day training is not about the law.  It is about what you and your program can do now to prepare for the biggest opportunities in immigration law in a quarter century.  We have a chance the like of which we have not seen since three million people obtained lawful status from the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA).  Participants will work in small groups to bring innovative and tested strategies and ideas to all as you create your Implementation Plan for DACA principally with a strategic assessment of how you can both reunite families while using the new Pre-adjudication of Unlawful Presence Waivers (PUPW) to boost naturalization demand.  You will leave with a road map to guide you through the intense months of implementation of the new changes.  All participants will receive a detailed DACA Implementation Plan Outline to complete during the training, a power point with the latest information on fees and strategies from the field, and a set of talking points to use when communicating the tremendous opportunities and challenges presented by the new procedures to foundations.

Earned income (fees) and their core importance to building sustainable programs that can continue to serve DREAMers will be covered. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies with a focus on Group Application Workshops for DREAMers and those applying to naturalize, using an army of volunteers, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, educational programs (ESL and Citizenship), and DREAM coalitions and student organizations.

The training will be presented by Vanna Slaughter, Division Director and BIA Fully Accredited Representative, Catholic Charities of Dallas, Michelle Sardone, BIA Fully Accredited Representative and Jack Holmgren. Sardone and Holmgren both work at CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities as Field Support Coordinators.

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax or scan a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 (fax)/jholmgren@cliniclegal.org (scan) to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 50 participants. The registration deadline is October 9, 2012 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information send an e-mail to Jack Holmgren at jholmgren@cliniclegal.org.

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Immigration Program Management Training with Optional LawLogix Professional Level Certification Workshop

Immigration Program Management Training with Optional LawLogix Professional Level Certification Workshop

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

Hosted by
LawLogix

November 13-14, 2012
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.  Day One
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.  Day Two

Optional Third Day of Training*
November 15, 2012
Professional Level Certification Workshop

  9:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.  Day Three
*Open to all current LawLogix users who have participated in the basic New User Web training.

Location:
LawLogix Training Center
3111 N. Central Ave
 Phoenix, AZ 85012

$235 per person from affiliate agencies; $705 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

Continental breakfast provided.


The first two days of this training provide a complete overview of how to start and sustain a nonprofit immigration legal services program. The training features a manual and curriculum that offers detailed information and suggestions for applying for Board of Immigration Appeals agency recognition and staff accreditation, implementing effective case management systems, fundraising and scores of other pertinent topics related to managing an immigration program.  

Participants will learn how to determine which applications to accept and how to adjust fees to obtain the best support for their program.  There will also be a discussion of case intake and management strategies with a focus on Group Application Workshops for DACA applicants, using an army of volunteers, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is highly interactive. Participants will leave with a plan to create or improve immigration legal services. Past participants have used information from this training to build or expand their legal immigration capacity.


Optional Third Day of Training*
*Open to all current LawLogix users who have participated in the basic New User Web training.

Become a PowerUser of LawLogix after this one day training at the LawLogix headquarters in Phoenix. Participants will gain experience and expertise on how best to use the software’s features to maximize efficient and high-quality legal service provision. Hands-on practice will be provided to assist with case management, reporting features, the EDGE calendar, and more.


General Training Information

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

The training will be presented by Jack Holmgren and Michelle Sardone, both of whom work at CLINIC’S Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities as Field Service Coordinators.  The optional third day of training will be provided by LawLogix staff.

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 30 participants. The registration deadline is November 5, 2012 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information call Michelle Sardone at (202) 756-5503. 

Click here for loging options.

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Update on Deferred Action for DREAMers

USCIS Director Alejandro Mayorkas shared additional details on the June 15th Deferred Action policy memorandum on a Stakeholder Teleconference.  All the new details can be found on the USCIS website at: www.uscis.gov/childhoodarrivals.  Under this new administration policy, DHS will be able to grant deferred action to certain qualifying young people, often known as DREAMers, who have fulfilled age, residency, and educational or military requirements.

Join CLINIC's Advocacy, Capacity Building, and Training and Legal Support staff for a FREE webinar that will cover a summary of the updates shared on this afternoon’s teleconference as well as how to prepare your organization for this new program.

Held on August 6, 2012.

Resources by type: 

"Mega" Group Application Workshop Training

"Mega" Group Application Workshop Training -
A Series of Three Training Events:


1) Mega Workshop Webinar - Wednesday, September 12 -2:00-3:30 p.m. EDT (Register below)

2) Mega Workshop Training in Los Angeles - Friday, November 16

3) Mega Naturalization Workshop Event in Los Angeles - Saturday, November 17
(registration for the November 16 and 17 events will be open soon)

Webinar Hosted By:
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.
&
NALEO Educational Fund

This series of three training events is the first of its kind. The purposes of the events are to: 1) educate charitable immigration legal staff on the unique differences of planning and implementing a large, "mega" group application workshop for naturalization and deferred action; 2) offer a one-day, on-site training in Los Angeles about the mega workshop model; and 3) give trainees actual "mega" workshop experience the next day serving an estimated number of 350 naturalization applicants.     

The webinar and on-site training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices.    

Please note that registration for the training and workshop will be released at a later date soon. Registration for the September 12 webinar is not required to attend the on-site training and workshop. Registration for the webinar is not a commitment to attend the training or workshop. For questions, please contact Jeff Chenoweth at jchenoweth@cliniclegal.org or 202-635-5826.

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers Management Training

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers: Maximizing Your Agency's Effectiveness for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals; Pre-adjudication of Unlawful Presence Waivers; Increasing Naturalization; Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)
 
Co-Sponsors
Asian Pacific American Legal Center
Catholic Charities of Los Angeles
United Farm Workers Foundation

September 5th (Wednesday), 2012
9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Location:
Asian Pacific American Legal Center
1145 Wilshire Blvd., 2nd Floor
Los Angeles, CA 90017
T - (213) 977-7500

$130 per person from affiliate agencies; $390 cap ($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$145 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $435 cap
($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$255 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

This one-day training is not about the law. It is about what you and your program can do now to prepare for the biggest opportunities in immigration law in a quarter century. We have a chance the likes of which we have not seen since three million people obtained lawful status from the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA). Participants will work in small groups to bring innovative and tested strategies and ideas to all as you create your Implementation Plans for both new procedures. You will leave with a road map to guide you through the intense months of implementation of the new changes. All participants will receive a detailed Implementation Plan Outline to complete during the training, a power point with the latest information on fees and strategies from the field, and a set of talking points to use when communicating the tremendous opportunities and challenges presented by the new procedures to foundations.

Earned income (fees) and their core importance to building sustainable programs that can continue to serve DREAMers will be covered. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies with a focus on Group Application Workshops for DREAMers and those applying to naturalize, using an army of volunteers, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, educational programs (ESL and Citizenship), and DREAM coalitions and student organizations.

The training will be presented by Genevieve Maciel, Immigration Program Director and Immigration Attorney, United Farm Workers Foundation, Michelle Sardone, BIA Fully Accredited Representative and Jack Holmgren. Sardone and Holmgren both work at CLINIC's Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities as Field Support Coordinators.

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 75 participants. The registration deadline is September 3, 2012 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information call Jack Holmgren at (415) 394-8074.

 

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers Training

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers: Maximizing Your Agency’s Effectiveness for Deferred Action for DREAMers; Stateside Processing of Unlawful Presence Waivers; Increasing Naturalization; Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

Co-Sponsors
Catholic Charities of the East Bay
Catholic Youth Organization/Catholic Charities of San Francisco
United Farm Workers Foundation

August 9th (Thursday), 2012
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location:
La Pena Cultural Center
3105 Shattuck Ave.
Berkeley, CA  94705
510-849-2568

$130 per person from affiliate agencies; $390 cap ($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees  from the same office location)

$145 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $435 cap ($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$255 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

This one-day training is not about the law.  It is about what you and your program can do now to prepare for the biggest opportunities in immigration law in a quarter century.  We have a chance the likes of which we have not seen since three million people obtained lawful status from the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA).  Participants will work in small groups to bring innovative and tested strategies and ideas to all as you create your Implementation Plans for both new procedures.  You will leave with a road map to guide you through the intense months of implementation of the new changes.  All participants will receive CLINIC’s celebrated Managing an Immigration Program and a set of talking points to use when communicating the tremendous opportunities and challenges presented by the new procedures to foundations.

Earned income (fees) and their core importance to building sustainable programs that can continue to serve DREAMers will be covered. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies with a focus on Group Application Workshops for DREAMers and those applying to naturalize, using an army of volunteers, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, educational programs (ESL and Citizenship), and DREAM coalitions and student organizations.

The training will be presented by Genevieve Maciel-Kramer, Immigration Program Director and Immigration Attorney, United Farm Workers Foundation, Francisco Gonzalez, Immigration Program Manager and BIA Fully Accredited Representative (formerly Legal Services Supervisor at Educators For Fair Consideration) and Jack Holmgren, Field Support Coordinator at CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities. 

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 45 participants. The registration deadline is August 6, 2012 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information call Jack Holmgren at (415) 394-8074.

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Welcoming Three Million Newcomers Training

  Welcoming Three Million Newcomers: Maximizing Your Agency’s Effectiveness for  Deferred Action for DREAMers; StatesideProcessing of Unlawful Presence Waivers; Increasing Naturalization; Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

 Hosted by
Catholic Charities of Portland, Oregon

August 10th (Friday), 2012
9:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Location:
Catholic Charities
2740 SE Powell Boulevard
Portland, OR  97202
503-231-4866

$130 per person from affiliate agencies; $390 cap ($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$145 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $435 cap
($45 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$255 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

This one-day training is not about the law.  It is about what you and your program can do now to prepare for the biggest opportunities in immigration law in a quarter century.  We have a chance the likes of which we have not seen since three million people obtained lawful status from the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA).  Participants will work in small groups to bring innovative and tested strategies and ideas to all as you create your Implementation Plans for both new procedures.  You will leave with a road map to guide you through the intense months of implementation of the new changes.  All participants will receive CLINIC’s celebrated Managing an Immigration Program and a set of talking points to use when communicating the tremendous opportunities and challenges presented by the new procedures to foundations.

Earned income (fees) and their core importance to building sustainable programs that can continue to serve DREAMers will be covered. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies with a focus on Group Application Workshops for DREAMers and those applying to naturalize, using an army of volunteers, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, educational programs (ESL and Citizenship), and DREAM coalitions and student organizations.

The training will be presented by Sarah McClain, Program Director, Catholic Charities of Portland and Immigration Attorney and Jack Holmgren, Field Support Coordinator at CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities. 

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 40 participants. The registration deadline is August 6, 2012 or sooner if registration is full. For registration information call Jack Holmgren at (415) 394-8074.

REGISTER HERE

Training by type: 
Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Hot Topics in Immigration Program Management Training

  Hot Topics in Immigration Program Management Training

Sponsored by
Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

September 13-14 2012
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST – Day One
8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. EST – Day Two

Location:
Catholic Charities USA
2050 Ballenger Avenue
Alexandria, VA 22314
703-549-1390

$270 per person from affiliate agencies; $810 cap ($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)


$295 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $885 cap
( 50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$425 per person for private attorneys and staff

Please be sure to register under the correct category and for the correct training. All registration changes or cancellations are subject to an administrative charge of $70.00.

Lunch for both days is catered and included in the registration fee

This two-day training is focused on strategic program management and capacity development topics. The curriculum will include elements of CLINIC’s highly praised Immigration Program Management training but extend beyond it for more advanced learning opportunities.  The training will draw from these advanced areas:

►Group application workshop models for unexpected changes in immigration law or policy such as Deferred Action for DREAMers. Each participant will practice the workshop model and create a workshop plan for her or his program.

► Measuring program outcomes for fundraising and marketing effectiveness.  Participants will learn a logic model and apply it to designing a project and spotlighting outcomes which are attractive to many funders.

►Program management challenges and ethical dilemmas with proposed solutions. Participants will learn from actual and hypothetical cases and share their own experiences. 

► BIA Recognition and Accreditation.  Participants will learn about unique opportunities for volunteers to contribute to your program and how to prepare for anticipated changes to be made by the BIA in the recognition and accreditation process.

►Open forum for participants to raise issues, ask questions and share good practices that are replicable.

The training is highly interactive.  Participants will leave with useful and customized tools to help them create or improve immigration legal services.  

 

Presenters: Jeff Chenoweth, CLINIC’s Capacity Building Section Director and Laura Burdick and Michelle Sardone, CLINIC Field Support Coordinators

Registration details and deadline
The training is for the staff of community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status. As a requirement of registration, if you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at 202-635-2649 to the attention of Michelle Sardone. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

The deadline for registration is August 31, 2012 or sooner if registration is filled.  Only on-line registration and payment by credit card is accepted at the CLINIC web site.   For space reasons, we suggest you register early. Registration may close prior to the stated deadline if the number or registrants reaches capacity. If that happens, the website will not accept your credit card payment. For more information, contact Michelle Sardone at msardone@cliniclegal.org or 202-756-5503.

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

CLINIC Quarterly Webinar

June 22, 2012
CLINIC Quarterly Webinar  

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time

Cost:  Free for Affiliates only
 
Join us on Friday, June 22 for CLINIC 's second quarterly webinar review of legal updates and news on CLINIC initiatives and services. Our webinar panelists will discuss (a) VAWA Reauthorization; (b) ICE enforcement through use of fingerprints taken for custody determinations; (c)  CIS roll-out of "ELIS", a new system for filing applications electronically and to increase in number and type in the near future; (d) new Supreme Court cases addressing LPRs and admission, and cancellation of removal, and new BIA cases on unlawful presence, and refugees subject to removal; (e) lock-box filing and stateside processing of all waiver applications; (f) CIS  reaffirmation of 1990 policy to not classify children as conditional residents if there is no conditional resident spouse and (g) news from CLINIC's Executive Office.  Don't miss the latest news from the field: register for this free affiliates-only webinar today!  

REGISTER HERE

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.  For additional information contact Dinah Suncin at dsuncin@cliniclegal.org. 

Training by type: 
Training Category: 

Citizenship for Elders: Issues and Options in Test Preparation, 2nd Edition (2012)

Citizenship for Elders is a unique handbook for teachers and administrators on creating and managing a citizenship program for the older learner.  This handbook brings together the observations and insights of teachers from across the country on older learners from a wide range of cultures.  It is based on a nationwide survey of 200 programs.  It identifies the issues in teaching elders and makes recommendations for instruction and program design.  The recommendations are practice-based, with a focus on innovative and promising practices.  The suggestions on learning activities, cultural considerations for the classroom, and strategies to address common health issues will be particularly helpful to teachers.  CLINIC hopes this free handbook will help service providers strengthen their programs and assist many more elders to secure their future in the U.S. by becoming citizens.

Click Here to View "Citizenship for Elders"

Building Legal Immigration Services Capacity through National Networks and their Affiliates

Building Legal Immigration Services Capacity through

 National Networks and their Affiliates

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC)

 June 19 & 20, 2012

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. – Day One
8:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. – Day Two

This training is free and by invitation only.  You must request to register someone who did not receive this invitation directly 

Location

Catholic Charities USA
2050 Ballenger Avenue, 4th Floor,
Alexandria, VA 22314

 

The site is in "Old Town" Alexandria, a historical location along the Potomac River with interesting 18th and early 19th Century buildings

Breakfast and lunch will be provided.

REGISTER HERE

The registration deadline is June 6. For details about the event, contact Jeff Chenoweth at 202-635-5826 or jchenoweth@cliniclegal.org.

This training is CLINIC's third event to increase collaboration among national networks and build capacity for local immigration legal programs. While CLINIC is the host, it will benefit from the contributions of World Relief staff and other networks in attendance.

The goals of the training are to increase:1) collaboration among national networks; 2) the availability of charitable legal immigration programs; 3) national network capacity to support local programs through the provision of Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) agency recognition and staff accreditation; and 4) staff use of best practices with greater professionalism and ethical conduct.

The training will provide an opportunity for attendees to:

● meet with EOIR/BIA (to be invited) to discuss developments in the BIA recognition and accreditation process and USCIS on its public engagement campaigns and business redesign particularly e-filing of immigration benefit applications. EOIR and USCIS presence is dependent on their availability;

● identify support services necessary to help local programs fulfill the anticipated BIA recognition and accreditation regulations;

● share and learn from national network materials and toolkits designed to create, expand and sustain immigration legal programs;

● learn different program evaluation methods to build greater stakeholder support primarily by transforming program and client service data into compelling messages and stories;

● spot-check ethical dilemmas and violations that need to be avoided at the direct legal representation level to protect clients and agencies from harm; and

● observe and learn from different technologies and multi-media tools used to promote and facilitate access to immigration benefits, particularly naturalization (i.e. demographic mapping; self-directed e-learning on naturalization law and the group application workshop model); CitizenshipWorks; case management web-based systems; and CLINIC's new La Ciudadanía: Cambia Tu Vida (Citizenship: Change Your Life) campaign, a multi-media package of television and radio commercials, posters, postcards (viral and paper) to encourage relatives and peers to naturalize; a Spanish-language website and more.

Lodging, Local Transportation

Hotels

The Westin Alexandria (across the street from CCUSA)
400 Courthouse Square
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 253-8600

Hilton Alexandria Old Town (near the King Street Metro and short walk to CCUSA)
1767 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 837-0440

Residence Inn Alexandria Old Town/Duke Street
1456 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 548-5474

This hotel does not provide shuttle service.

Embassy Suites Alexandria Old Town
1900 Diagonal Road
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 684-5900

Shuttle Service Information for Embassy Suites:
Complimentary shuttle is offered within 2 Mile Radius of the Hotel

Hampton Inn Alexandria-Old Town/King Street
1616 King Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
(703) 299-9900

This hotel does not provide shuttle service

Sheraton Suites Old Town Alexandria (shuttle service information below)
801 North Saint Asaph Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Telephone: (703) 836-4700
Toll Free: 1(800) 325-3535

Shuttle Service Information for the Sheraton Suites:
Shuttles pick up in front of doors #5 and #9 at the baggage claim. Shuttles run every 30 minutes

Hours of Operation:
6 AM to 10 AM
4 PM to 8PM
*After 8PM, shuttle runs every hour until 11PM.

Please feel free to call the hotel when you arrive to schedule shuttle service at (703) 836-4700. If you arrive after 11 PM taxis are available from the airport at a fee of approximately $15-18.

Metro Directions to the Sheraton Suites:

If you choose to utilize the Metro (http://www.wmata.com/) to get to the hotel you will enter at the Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport station and will exit at the next stop, Braddock Road station for the hotel. You must take the Franconia-Springfield train on the Blue Line or the Huntington train if it is the Yellow Line train.  These lines are parallel between the airport and Braddock Road station so it does not matter which train you take so long as you are going in the right direction.

Upon exiting the Braddock Road Metro station, you should head north on North West Street towards Madison Street, turn right onto Madison Street, and turn left onto North Saint Asaph Street; the hotel will be on your right. It is approximately an 11 minute walk; therefore, for your convenience, you should take the hotel shuttle from the airport or arrange the hotel shuttle to pick you up from the Braddock Road Metro station by calling (703) 836-4700.

Registration

Register by clicking the link at the top of this announcement.

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 4: Network Technology Innovations

April 24, 2012

Join us for Part 4 in a four part series for a presentation of tech innovations within the CLINIC network. We'll learn about CitizenshipWorks, a program designed to assist local programs in helping clients naturalize. We'll also learn from several network affiliates about innovative ways they've used technology in their offices and how it has impacted the way they reach the public. Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington DC office moderates the discussion.

Resources by type: 

Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

June 7, 2012
Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time

Cost:  Free
 
Children who have been the victims of abuse, abandonment or neglect are among the most vulnerable immigrants in our society.  These children may qualify for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS), a pathway to becoming a lawful permanent resident.  The presenters will discuss the eligibility requirements for SIJS as well as the procedures for applying both affirmatively and defensively in removal proceedings.  The presenters for this webinar are Sarah Bronstein and Kristina Karpinski, Training and Legal Support Attorneys with Catholic Legal Immigration Network.  This is a free webinar.

REGISTER HERE

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.  For additional information contact Dinah Suncin at dsuncin@cliniclegal.org.

Training Category: 

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 3: Case Management Software

Join us for Part 3 in a four part series for a conversation about case management software and other database capabilities. Topics will include why to use case management software, how to choose a software package, and how best to use software in your daily work. Jack Holmgren, a Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's San Francisco office, will moderate the discussion.

Resources by type: 

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 2: Effectively Using Social Media and Outreach Tools

Join us for Part 2 in a four part series as we talk about how best to use social media and outreach tech tools to increase the visibility of your program on the internet.  We'll compare the current options such as blogging, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter and examine the pluses and minuses of using each one.  We'll also talk about sources for tech support, particularly for non-profits.

Held on February 28, 2012.

Resources by type: 

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 1: Introduction to Office Technology Tools

Join us for Part 1 in a four part series as we explore quick and easy tech upgrades your program can make to improve communication and service to the community . We'll talk about technological changes coming down the pike from USCIS and why it is important to get a jump start on planning for those today. We will also hear from several members of CLINIC staff give tips on how best to access technology used by our organization to better serve our network. Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington D.C. office will moderate the discussion on how best to leverage the power of technology to your program's advantage.

Held on January 31, 2012.

Resources by type: 

LawLogix Immigration Partner Program

LawLogix Logo
Pricing discounts, training and certification programs for CLINIC affiliates (members and subscribers) using EDGEtm , the leader in Immigrant Forms and Case Management Software

CLINIC affiliates play a critical role in providing immigrants with reputable and trustworthy immigration assistance, a mission that aligns well with LawLogix's pledge to only sell its software to immigration attorneys and accredited BIA representatives.  LawLogix is the only immigration case management software company to partner with a nonprofit organization the size and caliber of CLINIC, a sign of the commitment between both organizations to bring value to their stakeholders and to the community.  With pricing discounts, unique training opportunities and certification programs designed for CLINIC affiliates, the CLINIC-LawLogix exclusive agreement is definitely a win for everybody!

EDGEtm, a web-based system, allows users to streamline the consultation process, track and report any and all data entered, organize and manage the lifecycle of all its immigration cases - from initial consultation, completing questionnaires, preparing forms, filing, billing, tracking priority dates - and much more in a paperless and secure system.  Users can also set notifications for deadlines and court dates and set advance reminders. 

CLINIC affiliates can visit the dedicated page here for more information about starting with LawLogix's EDGEtm case management system and gaining the full advantage of the CLINIC-LawLogix exclusive agreement.

For more information from CLINIC, please contact Jeff Chenoweth at jchenoweth@cliniclegal.org.

Partnership Resources

Citizenship for Elders: Issues and Options in Test Preparation, 2nd Edition (2012)

Citizenship for Elders is a unique handbook for teachers and administrators on creating and managing a citizenship program for the older learner.  This handbook brings together the observations and insights of teachers from across the country on older learners from a wide range of cultures.  It is based on a nationwide survey of 200 programs.  It identifies the issues in teaching elders and makes recommendations for instruction and program design.  The recommendations are practice-based, with a focus on innovative and promising practices.  The suggestions on learning activities, cultural considerations for the classroom, and strategies to address common health issues will be particularly helpful to teachers.  CLINIC hopes this free handbook will help service providers strengthen their programs and assist many more elders to secure their future in the U.S. by becoming citizens.<--break->

 

Resources by type: 

Spotlight on Integration: 6 Part Series

Looking for ideas to promote and encourage immigrant integration within your community? CLINIC offers this 6 part series that spotlights immigrant integration initiatives across our network. Learn the definition of immigrant integration, its importance for our network and nation, and how it can be promoted locally. Featured programs encourage relationships between the receiving community and immigrants, give elderly refugees a place to use skills gained in their home countries, and connect asylees with available resources.

Please contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org if you would like for one of your projects to receive the spotlight.

 

Spotlight on Integration:  October 2010
Immigrant Integration and Why it Deserves the Spotlight

Spotlight on Integration:  November 2010
St. James English as a Second Language Program in Seattle, Washington

Spotlight on Integration:  December 2010
New York State Immigration Hotline and the ORR National Asylee Information and Referral Hotline, Catholic Charities Community Services in New York City, New York

Spotlight on Integration:  January 2011
Garden Project for Older Adult Refugees, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, Inc. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Spotlight on Integration:  February 2011
Institute for the Hispanic Family, Catholic Charities of Hartford in Hartford, Connecticut

Spotlight on Integration:  March 2011
The Borromeo Legal Project, St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in Arlington, VA

Resources by type: 

What's In It For Me? The Insider's Guide to the CLINIC & LawLogix Partnership

March 13, 2012
What's In It For Me? The Insider's Guide to the CLINIC & LawLogix Partnership

 
2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Standard Time

Cost:  Free


Get the inside scoop on what the CLINIC and LawLogix exclusive partnership means for current and new LawLogix users in CLINIC's network of affiliates.  Learn more about:

* Pricing Discounts for CLINIC affiliates
* Special added services

* Training and Certification
* Other additional details

* Sessions during the Convening

REGISTER HERE

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Webinar. 

For additional information, please contact Jeff Chenoweth at jchenoweth@cliniclegal.org.   

Training Category: 
Laura Burdick

CLINIC is pleased to announce our updated handbook, Strategies for Naturalizing the Most Vulnerable Applicants: A Guide to Helping Refugees and Immigrants Who Are Elderly, Disabled, Low-Income, Low-Literate, and Limited English Proficient.  The handbook, initially released in 2008, has been updated to reflect the latest naturalization policies and procedures.  It discusses English exemptions, due consideration, reasonable accommodations, disability waivers, oath waivers, fee waivers, and expedited processing.  It also contains approximately 30 links to various references and resources such as USCIS policy guidance and sample letters.

The handbook is available here as a free resource on the CLINIC website.

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 4: Network Technology Innovations

April 24, 2012
Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 4: Network Technology Innovations

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Standard Time

Cost:  Free

Join us for Part 4 in a four part series for a presentation of tech innovations within the CLINIC network. We'll learn about CitizenshipWorks, a program designed to assist local programs in helping clients naturalize. We'll also learn from several network affiliates about innovative ways they've used technology in their offices and how it has impacted the way they reach the public. Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington DC office will moderate the discussion. The first three webinars in this series are archived at www.cliniclegal.org.

REGISTER HERE

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.

Training Category: 

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 3: Case Management Software

March 27, 2012
Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 3: Case Management Software

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Standard Time

Cost:  Free

Join us for Part 3 in a four part series for a conversation about case management software and other database capabilities. Topics will include why to use case management software, how to choose a software package, and how best to use software in your daily work. Jack Holmgren, a Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's San Francisco office, will moderate the discussion. Stay tuned for the final webinar in this series: April 24.

REGISTER HERE

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.  For additional information contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

Training Category: 

Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 1: Introduction to Office Technology Tools

January 31, 2012
Making Technology Work for Your Program Part 1: Introduction to Office Technology Tools 

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Standard Time

Cost:  Free

Join us for Part 1 in a four part series as we explore quick and easy tech upgrades your program can make to improve communication and service to the community . We'll talk about technological changes coming down the pike from USCIS and why it is important to get a jump start on planning for those today. We will also hear from several members of CLINIC staff give tips on how best to access technology used by our organization to better serve our network. Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington D.C. office will moderate the discussion on how best to leverage the power of technology to your program's advantage. Stay tuned for the next 3 webinars in this series: February 28, March 27, and April 24.

Register by clicking here. After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.

 For additional information contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

 

Training Category: 

Board of Immigration Appeals Agency Site Recognition and Accreditation: Concerns and Trends

Board of Immigration Appeals Agency Site Recognition and Accreditation: Concerns and Trends

December 22, 2011 

9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m. Eastern Standard Time  
6:00 a.m. - 7:00 a.m. Pacific Standard Time

Cost: $50; Free for CLINIC affiliates paying annual dues

Immigration law is a relatively unique field as non-attorneys are permitted to practice with all of the rights and privileges of lawyers within the limits of administrative units dealing with this area.  But for this provision, many non-profits would not be able to offer these sorts of services.  This area is tightly regulated by the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) and recent changes and trends have increased that control.  Join Jack Holmgren, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's San Francisco office and select CLINIC affiliate program staff for a discussion about what the trends are and how you can prepare your office and your staff to meet these requirements.

Non-affiliates can register by clicking here.

Click here for complimentary webinar registration (log in required)

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.

Training Category: 

Naturalization Group Application Workshops

Held on November 17, 2011. 

What are the benefits of naturalization group application workshops?  How can you plan for a successful event?  This webinar discusses workshop models and approaches; planning for a workshop; and stages of the workshop event.  Speakers also provide tips for working with the media and recruiting volunteers.  The presenters are Laura Burdick, Naturalization Project Coordinator, CLINIC and Lizette Marquez-Escobedo, National Director of Civic Engagement, NALEO Educational Fund.

Issues: 
Resources by type: 

The Nuts and Bolts of Case Management and Legal Supervision

Held on November 11, 2011.

How do you ensure your case management systems are working effectively? How do you ensure the quality of your immigration work before it is filed? How can you ensure your program is providing quality immigration services?  In this 90 minute webinar, we will discuss the importance of case management and legal supervision in your immigration program. 

You will learn what it is, who can supervise, what supervision entails and where and how often supervision needs to occur.  CLINIC affiliates will be sharing their legal supervision model.  Please join Helen Chen, Field Support Coordinator of CLINIC, Kathleen Walsh, Executive Director of Catholic Charities of Raleigh and Lisa Chun, Supervising Attorney of North Carolina Justice Center. 

Resources by type: 

Strategies for Naturalizing the Most Vulnerable Applicants Webinar

Held on September 12, 2011.  This webinar discusses several key strategies for helping vulnerable applicants overcome barriers in the naturalization process.  Topics include disability waivers, reasonable accommodations for applicants with disabilities, due consideration on the citizenship test, and fee waivers for low-income applicants.  The presenters are Laura Burdick, Naturalization Project Coordinator, CLINIC; Alla Shagalova, Associate Director, Immigration Services, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society; and Amy Tenney, Immigration Legal Services Staff Attorney, World Relief. 

Issues: 
Resources by type: 

Naturalization Group Application Workshops

Naturalization Group Application Workshops

November 17, 2011

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time

Cost: Free 

What are the benefits of naturalization group application workshops?  How can you plan for a successful event?  This webinar will discuss workshop models and approaches; planning for a workshop; and stages of the workshop event.  Speakers will also provide tips for working with the media and recruiting volunteers.  The presenters are Laura Burdick, Naturalization Project Coordinator, CLINIC and Lizette Marquez-Escobedo, National Director of Civic Engagement, NALEO Educational Fund.

Non-affiiates, register by clicking here.

Affiliates, click here for complimentary webinar registration (log-in required).

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar.    For additional information, please contact Laura Burdick at lburdick@cliniclegal.org.

Training by type: 
Training Category: 

Immigration Program Management Training

 

Immigration Program Management Training

 January 25 and 26, 2012

8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. – Day One
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. – Day Two 

Location

Loyola University New Orleans College of Law
Law Clinic and Center for Social Justice
540 Broadway Street, Room 134
New Orleans, LA 70118

Street parking is limited. It is recommended that participants take the street car to the Broadway stop.

$235 per person from CLINIC affiliate staff; $705 cap ($50 materials fee for each additional staff from the same office location)

$260 per person for other non-profit agency staff; $780 cap
($50 materials fee per person for more than 3 attendees from the same office site)

$390 per person for private attorneys and staff 

Breakfast will be provided. Lunch will be on your own.
Registration fee includes a copy of the training manual.
There is a $70.00 cancellation fee.
 

This two-day training provides a complete overview of how to start and sustain a nonprofit immigration legal services program. It features a manual and curriculum that offers detailed information and suggestions for applying for Board of Immigration Appeals agency recognition and staff accreditation, implementing effective case management systems, fundraising and scores of other pertinent topics related to managing an immigration program. 

Participants will learn how to determine which applications to accept and how to adjust fees to obtain the best support for their program. There will be a discussion of case intake and management strategies, avoiding unauthorized practice of law, and strategies for working with the funders and delivering on grant objectives.

The training is highly interactive. Participants will leave with many new ideas to improve and strengthen their program. Past participants have used information from this training to build or expand their legal immigration capacity.

The training is suitable for program staff from a wide range of organizations, including established immigration programs, ethnic and immigrant organizations, domestic violence and sexual assault coalitions and service providers, unions, social services and medical providers, and educational programs (ESL and Citizenship).

The training will be presented by Jack Holmgren and Leya Speasmaker from the Catholic Legal Immigration Network.  

The training is for the staff of Catholic agencies and other community-based organizations with IRS 501(c)(3) status, and attorneys and legal worker staff of private law offices. If you are registering as staff of a community-based organization, fax a copy of your IRS 501(c)(3) letter designating your agency as a nonprofit entity to CLINIC at (415) 394-8986 to the attention of Jack Holmgren. Your registration will be confirmed upon receipt of this letter and your payment through the website by credit card only. No checks or cash accepted for payment.

Space is limited to 25 participants. The registration deadline is January 18thor sooner if registration is full. For registration information call Leya Speasmaker at (202) 756-3753.

 

Lodging

Hampton Hotel Inn Garden District                                                                                         3626 St. Charles Ave., New Orleans, Louisiana 70115

There are several bed and breakfasts around the training site.

The St. Charles Ave. Streetcar stops right outside both hotels. There are many other hotels in New Orleans on the St. Charles Ave. Streetcar line.

 

REGISTER HERE

Training Category: 
Training Location: 

How to Design and Implement a Citizenship Program

 

December 6, 2011
How to Design and Implement a Citizenship Program

 

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time 
11:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time
Cost: Free 

 

Citizenship test preparation classes and quality legal services go hand in hand in assisting an immigrant along the path to citizenship. As programs seek better ways to serve the foreign born as they prepare to naturalize, CLINIC offers this webinar as a tool to use when developing an in-house citizenship program with legal and educational services. Covered topics will include program needs, planning for a citizenship program, and examples of program models. Join Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator in CLINIC's Washington D.C. office and Daniel Quinn, Citizenship Program Manager at Hogar Immigrant Services in Falls Church, Virginia for a discussion about how best to plan and implement an effective citizenship  program in your agency.

Non-affiliates, register by clicking here.

Affiliates, click here for complimentary webinar registration (log-in required).

 

After registering you will receive a confirmation email containing information on joining the webinar. 

For additional information, please contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

Training by type: 
Training Category: 

Unaccompanied Children

Who are these children, and how did they get here?

Children find themselves unaccompanied and vulnerable in the U.S. for many reasons. Some are victims of human traffickers, others flee neglect or abuse, and still others are sent to work to help support their families. What these children share in common is that, without your representation, they have nobody to help them understand their immigration proceedings or assert their legal rights.

Jorge* fled Honduras because gangs were targeting his family.  On two separate occasions, his siblings were shot at by gang members.  His brother and sister were each beaten several times causing them to be placed in comas. They have since recovered but another brother was killed by the gang. Jorge was beaten brutally by gang members with a gun and suffered a concussion.  While police investigated, no one was arrested. He is very scared of living in Honduras.  The gang has threatened to make him disappear, kidnap him, and kill him. 

***

Beke* fled to the United States after his brother and father, a police officer, were killed by an extremist group. Alone, he tried to refuse the group’s recruitment of him as a soldier. He wanted to go to school. He moved frequently because of ongoing conflict based on religion and clan membership. At 17, he’s afraid to return to Somolia because of the country’s ongoing violence and civil war. He also does not have any family there since his father and sibling were killed. He does not know the whereabouts of his mother.

***

 Originally from El Salvador, Alvita* has lived in four different homes and suffered abuse by each caretaker.  Her mother left her with her paternal grandfather when she was 3 years old.  Her grandfather, an alcoholic, was abusive and often hit her. At the age of six she was attacked by a family friend. Afraid to tell her mother, Alvita ran away and lived on the streets for about a month before she went to live with her maternal grandparents. Things were not much better there and soon she was sent to live with her aunt and eight cousins. They were also abusive, often fight and hit her and steal any food and gifts that her mother sent her from the U.S.  The minor is afraid to return to El Salvador and will not live with any of her family because they all hurt her in the past.  She is also afraid of the gangs because they kill children.

*names have been changed to protect the identity of minors.

New Member Agency

CLINIC has accepted and welcomes a new member agency, Catholic Worker of Akron, located at St. Bernard-St. Mary Parish, Akron, Ohio. Ada L. Gelpi is the director of the Catholic Worker of Akron Immigration Program that is also staffed by Luz A. Cardenas.  The program is located at 1096 S. Main Street, Akron, OH.

Wendy Rhein

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
CONTACT: Wendy Rhein
202-635-5825  wrhein@cliniclegal.org

CLINIC Awarded $600,000 Grant to Provide Citizenship Services

Washington, DC - The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) was selected for a coveted national award from the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) to strengthen citizenship programs serving Legal Permanent Residents in four cities in the United States.

Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit

Citizenship test preparation and quality legal services go hand in hand in assisting an immigrant along the path to citizenship. A prospective bill for comprehensive immigration reform will most likely bring changes in legal and language requirements for citizenship. It is the job of all legal service providers and teaching professionals working with the foreign born to anticipate these requirements and prepare clients in advance. The Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit will be helpful to anyone seeking ways to better serve the foreign born as they prepare to naturalize.

Please also see CLINIC’s Creating a Workplace ELL Program for information on how to partner with local businesses and implement a workplace English Language Learning program.

Click on the chapters below to read sections of the Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit

  1. Introduction: Tools for a Legal Program Interested in Starting a Citizenship Program - Designed for legal immigration programs interested in creating a citizenship program.
  2. A Client’s  Road to Citizenship - Follow the client’s road to citizenship with this chart that details the step-by-step process a client follows in order to become a U.S. citizen.
  3. Program Needs for Legal and Language Service Programs Combined - Compare the programmatic and equipment needs for legal and language programs, and learn what components of these two programs can be shared.
  4. Citizenship Program Models - Many citizenship programs start small and grow over time. This chart will identify easy services to implement now plus provide ideas for services to plan for in the future.
  5. Planning for a Citizenship Program - Creating a legal and language service program requires a lot of planning and thought. A sample Logic Model is provided to assist program development and a blank template can be printed for individual use.
  6. Program Development - Funding must be considered when planning to open a new program or to offer new services. Use this resource to learn about possible program standards required by funders as well as potential sources of funding.
  7. Integrating Technology into your Program - The use of technology is becoming increasingly important in the legal and language services field. This chart will pinpoint technological advances and improvements programs can make today and into the future.
  8. Sample Course Outlines for Citizenship Class - Click here to view sample course outlines for both ELL-based civics classes and citizenship classes.  
  9. Training  and other Resources - Visit this page to access resources that can be used for planning legal and language service programs.
  10. FAQs - Find answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding a citizenship preparation program.
  11. Terminology - Learn the definitions of commonly used terms and acronyms.

Questions? Contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

Resources by type: 
Projects: 

Starting a Legal Immigration Program: Capacity Building in a Charitable Community Agency

The Need for Charitable Legal Immigration Services

Current capacity does not meet current demands for low-cost legal representation in immigration matters. For instance, immigrants eligible and soon-to-be eligible to naturalize as U.S. citizens have less income, education, and English language ability than immigrants who naturalized in previous decades.

It is expected that any significant changes in current immigration law will greatly increase demand for services. One possible change is comprehensive immigration reform (CIR) with an earned pathway to citizenship for an estimated 11.9 million undocumented immigrants2 (commonly referred to as “legalization”).

Lawyers working in private practice and at nonprofit agencies are the major legal service providers to persons in need of legal representation, including non-citizens seeking immigration-related services. Lawyers specifically concentrating in the field of immigration law include the 11,000 members of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, as well as thousands of others who focus on immigration law as their primary practice area. For lowincome immigrants, however, legal representation through the private bar is often not an affordable option, as Legal Services Corporation (LSC) “alienage” restrictions on LSC-funded agencies prevent them from providing low-cost services to many non-citizens, including most of the undocumented.

Because of these limitations, many low-income immigrants seek services from other nonprofit agencies, many of which are faith-based and often provide a wide array of both social and legal services. In many instances, these agencies are staffed by non-attorney legal workers who
provide both counseling and direct services to clients. In the field of immigration law, non-attorney legal workers may be authorized to provide legal services to the same extent as an attorney if they become what is known as an “accredited representative” and work for a nonprofit agency
that has applied for and received “recognized agency status.”

Information about the requirements for obtaining this status is included in Appendix 1. To date, there are approximately 700 nonprofit offices with recognized agency status, and approximately 650 persons with accredited representative status. Nearly one-third of the recognized agencies are
affiliate programs of CLINIC.

Top Ten Program Management Issues Facing Immigration Legal Services Programs

CLINIC Capacity Building staff address the top ten most frequent challenges facing immigration legal service programs across the nation. Topics include how to develop a fee schedule, how to minimize risk, and how to create an efficient and effective case management system. Resources will be provided for each issue, and staff will provide tips for tackling these common challenges.  

Leya Speasmaker and Helen Chen are the presenters for this webinar.

Held March 3, 2011.

Resources by type: 

Immigration Case Management Tools

A good case management database contains both immigration forms and client-specific information.  The database may be software for stand-alone or networked computers or it may be web-based with the server off-site.  Either way, the choice and utilization of a database is an important investment for your immigration program.  In addition to completing forms, the database helps staff manage the caseload and facilitates the writing of data-rich reports and funding proposals.  Many of the benefits of a database are noted in the “Benefits of Case Management Software” article below.  After creating your policies and procedures manual, you will better know what functions you need or want from a case management database.  The prices and functions of case management databases vary, so you need to research products on the market by talking to the service representative for each vendor and to users of the vendor’s products.  

Immigration Case Management Providers

The information is provided merely as a starting point for readers to research immigration case management solutions. Increasingly, web-based systems are ne cessary for filing applications to the federal government.  Among all case management systems, choosing a vendor that provides responsive technical assistance is important in addition to function and cost.  As such, CLINIC exclusively recommends LawLogix as your best choice.

LawLogix

On February 14, 2012 CLINIC and LawLogix announced an exclusive agreement to provide CLINIC affiliates with added benefits for using LawLogix.  These benefits include special pricing discounts, custom user trainings, and private certification programs designed to promote best practices for immigration case management.  To see a demonstration of LawLogix, visit http://go.lawlogix.com/Demo_Request.html

More info

For more information on the CLINIC and LawLogix exclusive agreement, click here or contact LawLogix directly at:

LawLogix
http://www.lawlogix.com (877-725-4355 ext. 1) or sales@lawlogix.com

EImmigration by Cerenade
http://www.cerenade.com/eimmigration (800)-617-4202 or sales@cerenade.com

ILSForms by Immigration Law Systems, Inc.
http://www.ILSSYS.com (614) 252-3078 or Support@ilssys.com

ImmForms Plus 5.8 (CD-ROM)
http://store.westlaw.com/immforms-plus-5-8/182986/14396936/productdetail   (800) 344-5008
You can also ask about the separate “Immigration Practitioner” package, which is a package of legal research programs.

Immigration Aide (now has a Windows-based program)
http://www.immigrationaide.com (410) 444-3704

INS Zoom.com U.S. Immigration Management System (usIMS)
http://www.inszoom.com (925) 244-0600 or info@inszoom.com

LegalServer by PS Technologies, Inc.
http://legalserver.org (773)-782-1021 ext. 107 or ivashton@psti.net

LexisNexis Immigration Law Interactive Drafting System (IDS)
http://www.lexisnexis.com/store/catalog/booktemplate/productdetail.jsp?pageName=relatedProducts&prodId=prod14540391
800) 833-9844

Tracker by Tracker Corp
http://trackercorp.com/immigration-software.php (888)-411-TRKR or sales@trackercorp.com

 

Immigration Case Management Forms 

Case management forms are essential in immigration practice.  You cannot practice or practice very well without them. Below is a list of commonly used forms by practitioners.   This is not an exhaustive list, but a list to help you think what forms you need for your immigration program.   Each form contains a sample primarily to educate you about the forms’ purpose and content.  We highly encourage you to review the sample forms as educational pieces and to create your own forms that best suit your immigration program.   .

Along with sample forms, review the Case Management Forms Content Checklist.  This checklist  provides suggestions of   information you may want to include in your forms.  You can access this document by clicking on the link above.

For sample forms, please click on the links below.

  • Preliminary Screening Form helps staff quickly identify what kind of assistance an individual requires and whether your immigration program provides such services.  The contents of the form may include the individual’s name and contact information, immigration benefit sought, and language preference.   The form is also useful for capturing data on how many people are coming to your office seeking services, even if their inquiries do not result in an intake. This data can shape your referral list and be useful in planning for future expansion of program services.
  • Intake Form  gathers an individual’s personal information, family information and immigration history to determine their eligibility for an immigration benefit. It is also used during the case selection process to decide if the case will be accepted by the agency.   For VAWA clients, the intake form can serve to identify other social services needed by the client to ensure their safety and well-being.  SeeVAWA Intake Form.
  • Fee Waiver Forms

o Fee Waiver Policy  is used to inform staff and potential clients of the procedure for requesting a fee waiver for an immigration service at your organization.  It is a best practice for fee waiver determinations to be made by someone other than the staff member who will be responsible for working on the case.  Separating the financial and substantive aspects of the case can reduce unnecessary tension or stress from the client/representative relationship.
o Income Reporting Sheet  helps staff determine at intake whether a potential client is eligible for a fee waiver under the terms of your organization’s policy.  
o Fee Waiver Form  is used for staff to document when a fee waiver is granted in a particular case.  The amount to be waived is noted and the form is signed by the client, staff and a supervisor, before being placed in the client’s file.
o Combination Fee Waiver Policy and Request Form  is used to both explain the fee waiver policy and be used to document the organization’s decision on the fee waiver request.

  • Retainer Agreement (also known as Client Agreement or Engagement Letter) formalizes the relationship between the client(s) and the representing agency.  It spells out the type and scope of services provided by the agency, the fees assigned to each service, and the rights and responsibilities of both the client(s) and the agency.  It is worth the time to develop a good retainer agreement.  A well written and thought out retainer agreement can help an agency prevent or minimize future conflicts and liabilities.  Even if your immigration services are free because your program is funded by a grant or by other sources, you still need a retainer agreement.  Providing free services does not absolve your agency from future conflicts and liabilities.  Your agency is still accountable to the client for anything related to their case.  Take the time to complete the retainer agreement and verbally communicate the details of the retainer agreement to your client to ensure they understand it.   If English is not your client’s first language make sure the agreement is translated to their native language or is interpreted to them before they sign it.

o New sample: English/Spanish sample provided by Catholic Charities of Arlington (Hogar).

  • Non-Engagement Letter  informs the individual that your agency will not be accepting their case. The letter may include the reasons as well as referrals to other immigration practitioners.  Often times, individuals assume you are taking their case just because you conducted an intake or provided a consultation.  When you inform them in writing that you are not pursuing their case further, it prevents confusion or misunderstanding.  It also protects your agency from any future disputes or conflicts. 
  • Case Notes creates a record of the work that has been performed on the immigration case.  Staff should keep detailed but concise case notes of what has been done in the case and when it was done, along with their initials or names next to each entry, so that work by more than one legal representative on the same case can be handled more efficiently without errors and mistakes.  (Case notes, like other forms, should be approached as if it is your last day of employment and someone else, yet to be determined, will be responsible for your cases.)
  • Case Transfer Memo reassigns cases due to staff turnover or redistribution of caseload.  The memo summarizes the case history, including client information and actions taken on the case, status of the case, and next steps.  It takes information contained in various documents in the case file and compiles it into a cohesive memo.   This memo increases staff efficiency and ensures services are not interrupted during a period of transition.
  • Case File Review Checklist guides staff on where to place specific documents in a client’s file.  Case files should include copies of all client documents, applications, and work products created on behalf of the client.  It needs to be organized in a standardized method.  Supervisors or other designated individuals need to review the case file periodically to ensure the case file contains all key documents and the documents are placed in a pre-determined manner according to the case file construction policy.
  • Technical Review Checklist provides the reviewer a tool to assess the accuracy and quality of the immigration application before it is filed with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) or Immigration Court. It standardizes the review process to ensure there is uniformity and consistency.   The review takes the form of both legal technical review and editing. Program directors often use the review process to evaluate the quality of their staff’s legal representation and case file management.horization by the client to release his/her information to third parties.  It protects client information from unauthorized disclosure and ensures that the staff maintains client confidentiality.
  • Consent to Release Form is an authorization by the client to release his/her information to third parties.  It protects client information from unauthorized disclosure and ensures that the staff maintains client confidentiality.  
  • Case Removal Sheet keeps track of whohas the case file when it is not in the central filing cabinet.  This is common sense, but may be easily overlooked. Since all case files need to be kept in a locked filing cabinet, it jeopardizes client confidentiality if staff members leave the case files lying around in their office or cubicle when they are not working on them.  The case files belong to the agency, not the staff member.  Thus, the agency’s program director needs to know the whereabouts of all case files if staff is absent, whether planned or due to an emergency, or in the event of case transfers.
  • Case Closing Memo is similar in purpose and content to the Case Transfer Memo in that it facilitates information sharing among staff in the event of case transfers or possible re-opening of a case when an individual qualifies for another immigration benefit.  Information contained in the memo includes summaries of client case background and procedural history, case status, case outcome, and next steps, if any.
  • Client Satisfaction Survey/Feedback helps to assess the quality of services provided to clients for future program improvements and development.  It also helps program managers and directors gather positive program outcomes and quotes for reports to agency leadership or funding proposals.  It is also a great marketing vehicle when used properly and produces another mechanism for evaluating staff performance and commending good performance.
  • Closing Letter to Client helps to formally conclude the relationship between the client and representing agency. Closing letters are generated when:   services have been completed as stated in the retainer agreement; the client has failed to uphold the responsibilities in the agreement; or the agency is no longer able or authorized to represent the client further.  When successfully representing a client in an immigration application, the case is not closed until the client receives the ultimate immigration benefit, not just an approval letter from USCIS or the Immigration Court.  For instance, in an application for Lawful Permanent Residence (LPR), the case should not be closed until the client has the LPR card (commonly referred as the green card) in his/her possession.  Similarly, in a citizenship application, the case is not closed until the client attends the oath ceremony and receives the Naturalization Certificate.  This ensures that the agency fulfills the scope of service listed in the retainer agreement. Once you are certain that the client has received their immigration benefit, you should send them a letter to: congratulate them; notify them that their case will be closed; inform them about the agency’s case retention policy; instruct them on how to access a copy of their case file contents; and inform them of next steps, if any, in their immigration process, including the possibility of helping family members immigrate to the U.S.   You should be sure to include this last point since it solicits an opportunity to serve the client again.

o New Sample: packet of immigration-benefit-specific closing letters provided by Catholic Charities of Arlington (Hogar).

  • Confidentiality Agreement is used for staff, volunteers, and any other individual working on the client case files.  Prior to joining the immigration program, all staff, volunteers, and other individuals with access to case files should be aware of the agency’s confidentiality policy, their responsibilities in upholding it, and the consequences of a breach in confidentiality.   A confidentiality policy should be signed to reinforce the seriousness of the policy and its ethical requirements.   It is also a good idea to reinforce the policy by having an in-house training on confidentiality for new staff (including volunteers) before they begin working on cases and by having trainings on a regular basis to reinforce the policy for existing staff, volunteers, and others involved with client casework.

 

  • Client Grievance Policy and Forms

o Client Grievance Procedure clearly outlines the options for a person to pursue a grievance about the manner or quality of assistance rendered by the program, or denial of services, or about alleged violations of state or federal laws, regulations, or the Clients' Bill of rights.
o Service Recipient Rights and Responsibilities ensures that the client is informed of both the organization’s duty to provide professional and compassionate service and her own duty to participate and assist in the representation.
o Acknowledgement of Receipt of Service Recipient Rights and Responsibilities is signed by the client and placed in the case file to document that the client was advised of her rights and responsibilities.
o Grievance Policy instructs staff to adhere to the Client Grievance Procedure. The goal is to ensure that each client is aware of the process for voicing a complaint or grievance against the organization and that their grievance will be addressed in a just and timely manner.
o Client Grievance Form #1 provides the person with an opportunity to explain the nature of the grievance and for the organization to document what action was taken as a response.
o Client Grievance Form #2 provides another sample for a client to pursue a grievance.

  • Moonlighting Policy specifically prohibits attorney staff from taking on immigration cases outside the agency.  This prevents possible conflicts of interest with the attorney’s work for the agency. It also protects agency staff from stress and burnout.

o   New sample: English/Spanish sample provided by Catholic Charities of Arlington (Hogar).[MG1] 


 [MG1]New link

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Thinking About Case Management

The design and implementation of immigration case management systems will vary among immigration programs since every program is different.  However, a program whose case management system works for staff members and meets the needs of clients are the most effective.  Such system takes into account the population served, types of services offered, level and experience of staff, agency’s mission and financial situation to name a few.   For organizations providing VAWA immigration services, you need to consider additional factors in your case management system for handling VAWA cases.  This may include more time for intakes, interviews and application preparation, a process for collaborating with domestic violence providers to provide application support and include additional confidentiality measures to protect the client, client information and the staff.  Such confidentiality measures may include having a separate interview room for VAWA clients, locking VAWA cases in a separate filing cabinet and limiting access of VAWA cases to those who are working on them, prohibiting staff from taking VAWA cases outside of the office other than for interviews and hearings and literally having an exit strategy for staff if the abuser came to the office.  Some of this is discussed in the article, “Considerations for Immigration Programs Working on VAWA Self-Petitions and U Visa Cases” listed below.  

Although there are differences among agencies in their case management policies and procedures, every agency should have certain case management components that are essential and non-negotiable. This applies to all agencies regardless of its size, age or type of services offered.

Whether you are developing or revising your existing case management system, a good starting point is to review the major components of immigration case management system.   The documents below especially the chapter from CLINIC’s Managing an Immigration Program manual entitled, “Case Management Systems” provides a good overview of the major components of case management system.  Hopefully, the resources below will help your office develop a case management system rooted in best practices.   

How to Establish and Develop a Successful ESL Program

Held Nov. 16, 2010

Due to an increasing need for quality English as a Second Language (ESL) and Citizenship Test Preparation classes, many community-based organizations are interested in starting their own language learning programs. Combining CLINIC’s key components for program management and Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages’ (TESOL) Standards for Adult Education ESL Programs, this Webinar will provide a foundation for interested organizations to plan and implement a language learning program. Instructor: Leya Speasmaker.

To download the presentation, click here.

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Managing Financial Performance

Nominal fees for immigration legal services are a core source of funding to start and sustain charitable programs.  By charging nominal fees you can retain a great deal of control over the financial viability of your program.  Conversely, to not charge fees is to put your program at risk of closing or drastic downsizing.

Does your legal immigration program struggle to know when and how to charge fees to clients?  Learn how to use something more logical and remunerative than the door as your case selection criteria. Does your legal immigration program have financial controls and procedures that will see it grow and meet the challenge of comprehensive immigration reform no matter when it comes?

This webinar is for all programs; experienced start-up and even for those just considering a program.  The presenters are Jack Holmgren, Field Support Coordinator and Jeff Chenoweth, Assistant Director for CLINIC’s Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities.  Both presenters are trainers for the Center’s Immigration Program Management classroom and webinar training series.  The presenters have trained and coached numerous programs to develop strong fee-based revenue.

Held in October, 2010.

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Language Access: Effectively Serving Limited- and Non-English Speakers

Language Access: Effectively Serving Limited- and Non-English Speakers

This is part 1 of a 3-part series on language access.

Does your agency have a legal obligation to provide interpretation or translation services to the people that you serve? Do language barriers prevent your clients from accessing critical information and services such as the legal system, emergency medical care, schools, firefighters or police? This Webinar will explain the laws that entitle limited- and non-English speakers to interpreters and that legally obligate organizations to provide individuals with language access. Learn how to ensure that your clients’ language access rights are fulfilled and how to develop an effective language access strategy for your agency.

To download the Power Point presentation, click here.

Held October 5, 2010

 

Part II - The Mechanics of English Language Learning

Part III - How to Establish and Develop a Successful ESL Program at Your Agency 

 

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Case Management Systems

How do you set up intake? Which cases should you accept for representation? What is a client services agreement? How do you track deadlines and cases? What goes into a case file? What are your responsibilities when you close a case?

This webinar explores the components of case management systems and will illustrate how a strong case management system is essential for a healthy immigration legal services program. This webinar is intended for both experienced program directors and for start-up programs seeking to grow. The presenters on this webinar are Kristina Karpinski, Training and Legal Support Attorney and Helen Chen, Field Support Coordinator for Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.

Held June 24, 2010.

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Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform: An Earned Pathway to Citizenship & Beyond

CLINIC has updated its 2006 Legalization Manual.

The manual, Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform: An Earned Pathway to Citizenship and Beyond offers recommendations from “veterans” of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA).   The manual was created to help charitable immigration agencies increase program capacity and prepare for a large increase in the number of people needing immigration services. Its recommendations are offered to spur thinking and planning by these programs. As IRCA taught us, a “one size fits all” approach cannot succeed since the needs and circumstances of programs vary. It is hoped that the manual will enable programs to develop the policies and practices that are best suited to the circumstances of their programs and communities.

This manual is not intended to be used to create immigration legal service programs. For those interested in learning how to start an immigration legal service program, please refer to Immigration Management: Building Blocks for a Successful Program (“Immigration Management”) by CLINIC, the Lutheran Immigration and Refugee Service (LIRS), and Immigration and Refugee Services of America.

Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform: An Earned Parthway to Citizenship and Beyond begins with a summary or check list of recommendations. It then provides an extensive narrative that elaborates on these recommendations. 

To download the entire manual, click here.

MEMBER RESOURCES:

CLINIC has developed a proposal document to help its affiliates apply for funding related to immigration and specifically Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR).  To view these documents, please log in and click on the links below.

Proposal Template

Worksheet - Objectives, Activities and Timeline

Staffing Your Immigration Legal Program

Nonprofit immigration legal programs have a range of staffing options. Programs may employ licensed attorneys, law graduates, fully accredited representatives, partially accredited representatives, non-accredited immigration counselors, support staff, interns and volunteers. In this third of a seven part webinar series on immigration program management, the presenter will explore how to optimize your program's performance with careful staffing.

This webinar is intended for experienced program directors and also for start-up programs seeking to grow. Future webinars will present topics contained in CLINIC's immigration program management training manual including; Board of Immigration Appeals agency recognition and staff accreditation; case management systems; managing financial performance;outreach and marketing; and advocacy.

Held March 30, 2010

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Space, Equipment and Tools

While staff is the heart of an immigration program, several other resources are required to keep a program functioning. These include: physical space, computers, software, law library materials, and malpractice insurance.  In this second of a seven-part webinar series on immigration program management, the presenter will discuss the different resources needed to support an immigration legal services program.

This webinar is intended for experienced program directors and also for up-start programs seeking to grow.  Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator for CLINIC’s Center on Citizenship and Immigrant Communities, is the presenter for this webinar.

Held February 2, 2010

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Space, Equipment and Tools

While staff is the heart of an immigration program, several other resources are required to keep a program functioning. These include: physical space, computers, software, law library materials, and malpractice insurance.  In this second of a seven-part webinar series on immigration program management, the presenter will discuss the different resources needed to support an immigration legal services program.

This webinar is intended for experienced program directors and also for up-start programs seeking to grow.  Leya Speasmaker, Field Support Coordinator for CLINIC’s Center on Citizenship and Immigrant Communities, is the presenter for this webinar.

Held February 2, 2010.

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Building Agency Support for an Immigration Legal Program

This webinar was presented by CLINIC's Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities.

Presenters: Jeff Chenoweth, director of CLINIC's Center for Citizenship and Immigrant Communities and Rose Alma Senatore, executive director, Catholic Charities of Hartford, CT.

This webinar discusses ways to recruit more leaders and financial donors in order to grow and sustain charitable legal immigration services for the challenges of today and a new environment for tomorrow.

Held Jan. 13, 2010.

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Family Safety Planning Training Manual

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has dramatically stepped up enforcement in the interior of the country. DHS agents of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Division are arresting immigrants at their homes, workplaces and on the streets in communities all across the country.

The numbers of immigrants arrested in ICE enforcement operations is staggering. For example, 4,077 workers were swept up in workplace raids and charged with administrative violations in Fiscal Year (FY) 2007. Already this year (through August 2008), roughly 3,900 workers have been arrested and more than 1,000 individuals have been criminally charged. Also, ICE’s Criminal Alien Program (CAP) initiated formal removal proceedings against 164,000 immigrants serving prison terms in FY 2007. This number is expected to grow throughout FY 2008 and FY 2009. Additionally, ICE’s Fugitive Operations Teams arrested over 30,000 individuals in FY 2007, double the number in FY 2006. These numbers also are expected to be higher in 2008 and 2009 as ICE added 29 new Fugitive Operations Teams to its existing 75 teams in September of 2008.

Given this enforcement environment, it is important for members of our communities to develop a family safety plan if they are at risk of arrest and detention. This training curriculum is designed for trainers that will present Family Safety Planning Training in their communities. Through this training, participants will learn about the issues that they need to think through as well as the paperwork and documents that they need to gather in order to help themselves and their family members.

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Translations of Citizenship Test Questions

Translations of the U.S. History/Government Test Questions

The translations listed here were completed by USCIS and community organizations throughout the country. For translations completed by community organizations, the organization's contact information is included on the translation.

***Please note that some information, such as the name of the President and Speaker of the House, changes regularly and may not be up to date. Other information, such as the name of the applicant’s Senator and Governor, will vary depending on where the applicant lives. 

Translations done by USCIS

 

Translations done by community organizations 

 

CLINIC Study Guide for the Citizenship Test

 

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Facts for Documented and Undocumented Workers Helping to Clean-up and Rebuild the Gulf Coast Region

IMMIGRANT WORKERS’ RIGHTS

All workers, including documented and undocumented immigrant workers, are protected by many U.S. employment and labor laws. Rights that may apply to workers depending upon the circumstances include:

Right to be paid. In most instances, workers have the right to be paid minimum wage ($5.15 an hour) and to receive overtime pay for work over 40 hours a week. If workers do not receive all of the wages for the time they actually worked, they can take action to recover those wages.

Right to be free of discrimination. It is illegal for an employer to discriminate against or harass workers based on race, color, religion, age, disability, national origin or sex.
Right to organize. In most workplaces, it is illegal for an employer to punish or threaten workers for organizing with others to improve their working conditions.

Right to be safe on the job. Workers are protected by workplace health and safety laws at their worksites.

Right to benefits if injured on the job. In most states, workers who are injured on the job are entitled to the protections of state workers’ compensation laws.

Right to unemployment payments. In most states workers who are fully or partially unemployed, looking for work, and have valid work documentation are eligible for unemployment insurance benefits.

 

Additional information for documented and undocumented workers helping to clean-up and rebuild the Gulf Coast region attached below.

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Strategies for Naturalizing the Most Vulnerable Applicants Handbook

Refugees and immigrants strongly desire U.S. citizenship. Yet, many of them, especially those who are elderly, disabled, low-income, low-literate, and limited English proficient, face serious challenges in the naturalization process. These challenges can impede their integration and their civic participation in U.S. society.

This handbooks outlines strategies for helping these particular populations naturalize.

Issues: