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In recent months we have all been troubled by the images of unaccompanied children, already traumatized by events in their home countries, and exhausted and frightened after a perilous journey, being apprehended at the southern border of the United States. And we have been appalled to see how some of our fellow citizens treated these children, screaming epithets at them and blocking the buses that were bringing them to safe refuge. The political pandering around this crisis has only added to our Nation’s shame.

As we gather with friends and family on Labor Day, we say goodbye to summer and celebrate the dignity of work and the contributions of immigrant workers to the building of the United States.  Immigrant workers -- from the Chinese workers who constructed our country's railroads, and the Irish miners who dug the coal that powered our industrialization, to the Latino and Filipino farm workers who make the United States the world's largest exporter of agricultural products -- fuel the strength and dynamism of the United States.  We see the legacy of immigrant workers in their role in building

 EWTN’s News Nightly recently highlighted the challenges within the immigration court system. In an interview with EWTN, CLINIC Advocacy Attorney Bradley Jenkins describes the difficulties immigrants face:


“The difficulties in presenting a case are compounded by the fact that you are testifying through an interpreter, the fact that in many places around the country you are your only witness and you are presenting your story through a television screen.”


The segment begins at 10:12


"If you listen very closely, you can hear the detained families chanting and yelling along with us.  This was a very moving experience.  Many participants were moved to tears when they heardthe women and children’s voices from the other side of the fence.”


The recent increase in youth fleeing violence in Central America and seeking protection in the United States has left federal authorities scrambling to find facilities to temporarily house these children until they can be reunited with family members or placed into foster care to await their immigration hearings. Many state and local leaders have taken steps to welcome this vulnerable population including offers to convert vacant buildings or military bases into emergency shelters.