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Offering in-state tuition rates to all residents benefits the state’s economy.

This is a very special time.  We find ourselves in the first week of Lent, recalling that Christ suffered for our sins and arose on the third day.  We also find ourselves marking the one year anniversary of the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) on March 7th,  and International Women’s Day on March 8th

Employed immigrants, regardless of status or documents used to acquire employment, are required to file taxes. Service providers working with the foreign-born can offer tax assistance preparation and support as their clients work to fulfill this federal requirement. Those without a Social Security Number can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to use when filing taxes. Please see the federal government’s resources on applying for and using the ITIN below.

The process of bringing foreign-born religious workers, including priests, brothers and sisters, and lay workers to the U.S. is a complicated one. A religious worker must be the beneficiary of an approved I-129 petition filed inside the U.S. before he or she can apply for the R-1 Religious Worker visa abroad. By requiring a religious organization and the foreign national to go through two steps in order to obtain an R-1 visa, the nonimmigrant visa process now takes much longer than it did prior to 2008. However, this process also allows USCIS the opportunity to verify the information submitted for the application, including information regarding the validity of the employer and the proposed employment.

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