Changes in Immigration Policy | CLINIC

Changes in Immigration Policy

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This Quick Guide will assist TPS holders in understanding DHS decisions on TPS, including terminations and indecisions. The Guide also offers seven steps TPS holders can take to prepare and provides helpful links to resources.  

 
 
 

Do you have clients with Temporary Protected Status who reside in the jurisdiction of either the Sixth or Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals? These frequently asked questions explain how current USCIS policy permits individuals who entered the United States without inspection, but subsequently received TPS, adjust to lawful permanent resident status.  

 
 
 

A federal court judge has ruled against Texas in the landmark case, City of El Cenizo et al v. Texas regarding the state’s anti-immigrant law, commonly known as SB4.

 
 
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This document can help undocumented individuals determine whether they might qualify for some sort of immigration relief and whether they are at high risk of being arrested by immigration.

 
 
 

Ten state attorneys general, parties to the Texas v. United States case, have threatened a legal challenge to the 2012 DACA program if the administration does not rescind it by Sept. 5, 2017.

 
 

Consolidated outreach flyer that includes links to CLINIC’s top resources on avoiding immigration services scams, Know Your Rights materials, and emergency planning for immigrant families at risk for deportation.

 
 
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The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans will expire on March 9, 2018 unless extended by the Department of Homeland Security Secretary. By statute, the DHS Secretary must decide whether conditions warrant extension of the deadline by Jan. 8, 2018.

 
 
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The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans will expire on March 9, 2018 unless extended by the Department of Homeland Security Secretary. By statute, the DHS Secretary must decide whether conditions warrant extension of the deadline by Jan. 8, 2018.

 
 
 
 
 
 

The Supreme Court announced June 26, 2017, that it will hear arguments during its upcoming term on the “travel ban” litigation, and in the meantime, it will allow part of the President’s executive order temporarily banning the entry into the United States of nationals of six Muslim-majority nations (Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) and refugees to go into effect.

 
 
 

Hateful, anti-immigrant rhetoric has become common place in the news cycle and in legislative bodies across our country. In order to combat the narrative, organizations serving immigrants must look for ways to safely amplify immigrant voices in their communities. This three-part guide will teach you how to combat anti-immigrant narratives through legislative testimony, local media work, and social media.

 
 
 

This guide provides an overview of the federal rulemaking process and information about how you can participate. Engaging in administrative advocacy ensures that we are using all avenues to fight for immigrants and will more effectively amplify our collective voice.

 
 
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The current six-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for approximately 50,000 Haitians will expire on Jan. 22, 2018unless extended by the Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security. By law, the secretary must decide by Nov. 23, 2017 whether conditions warrant extending TPS.

 
 
 

U.S. District Court Judge Derrick K. Watson of Hawaii on March 15, 2017, blocked enforcement of key provisions of President Trump’s revised executive order, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” The order banned most people from six predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States.

 
 

This webinar covered some best practices in informing your client communities about exposure to enforcement, protection against enforcement, and potential eligibility for immigration benefits.  It addressed: current enforcement priorities (as of 3/13/17); what to cover in a Know Your Rights presentation and how to cover it; what materials to distribute; the potential integration of self-screening or onsite screening by legal providers; and safety planning information. 

 
 
 

NOTE: The travel ban provision of this executive order, and its provision suspending refugee admissions, have been blocked from taking effect under court orders in Hawaii and Maryland. Other court challenges remain pending. More information can be found here

 

 
 
 

On March 6, 2017 President Trump signed an Executive Order imposing a 90-day suspension of entry and visa issuance to people from Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. This new Executive Order goes into effect March 16, 2017. Key provisions of the order and DHS FAQs are described below.

 
 

The “Unauthorized Practice of Immigration Law (UPIL): A State-by-State Overview of Legal Mechanisms to Combat these Deceptive Practice” resource is intended for immigration attorneys, recognized and accredited representative, and community-based organizations assisting noncitizen clients who have been victims of unauthorized practice of immigration law. 

 
 
 

The following is a simple summary of the main points of the enforcement guidance issued by the Department of Homeland Security Feb. 20 and DHS fact sheets of Feb. 21. More detailed legal analysis will follow.

 
 
 

The following is a simple summary of the main points of the enforcement guidance issued by the Department of Homeland Security Feb. 20 and DHS fact sheets of Feb. 21. More detailed legal analysis will follow.

 
 
 

This webinar included an analysis and discussion of the three executive orders issued on Jan. 25 and 27 and how they affect immigrants, refugees and the programs that serve them.

 
 

A collection of frequently asked questions about the recent Executive Orders under the new administration.

 
 
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Use these flyers in your community to help people identify whether the Executive Orders affect them and what they need to know and do. Includes a customizable box to put the contact information of the nearest legal service provider.

 
 
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In his first days in office, President Trump signed two executive orders affecting immigrants. This document provides talking points on how to address each of these in your communities.

 
 
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DACA is an executive action, implemented by President Obama in 2012, providing deportation relief and the opportunity to work for a select group of young, undocumented people living in the United States. This document provides some talking points.

 
 
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This resource can be provided to your clients. It answers questions such as, "What can you do to prepare?" and "What if you have DACA?".

This resource is also available in Spanish, a customizable English version, and a customizable Spanish version.