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CLINIC’s 15th annual Convening took place in Salt Lake City, Utah last week.  Each year, the Convening presents an opportunity for dialogue between federal agencies, direct service providers, and advocates on immigration issues affecting communities across the nation.  This year, we were honored to have two distinguished government speakers: León Rodríguez, Director of US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and Juan P. Osuna, Director of the Executive Office of Immigration Review (EOIR).

Minyoung Ohm is a staff attorney with the Religious Immigration Services Section of CLINIC.  Prior to joining CLINIC, she was an associate attorney at Carliner & Remes in Washington D.C. and practiced immigration law in a variety of areas, including asylum, family-based visa petitions, and business immigration matters.  She graduated from the American University’s Washington College of Law in 2003.

The Holy Spirit inspired the apostles to go forth and preach the joy of the Gospel. At Pentecost, we recognize this special time to celebrate the missionary call. We are inspired by all who, like you, have heard this call and pursued their vocations, no matter the obstacles on their journey.

Obstacles of immigration status are all too familiar to foreign born religious workers like Sr. Maria. Having crossed the border into the United States at fourteen years old, Maria didn’t have the papers necessary to pursue her calling to religious life.

Project Hope, based in Archbold, Ohio, provides professional legal services and educates immigrants about their rights and responsibilities of living in the United States. The organization's mission is to support immigrant integration and, as its name implies, give hope to immigrant families working and living in northwest Ohio (and beyond).  

A version of this letter appears in print on May 2, 2015, on page A20 of the New York edition of the New York Times with the headline: A Path to Citizenship.

To the Editor: