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*The following reflection originally appeared as a feature in Catholic Charities USA's Lent Reflection Series

 

Lamentations are a part of our faith tradition. They transcend the logic of reason, rational analysis, study and planning. They pierce the crusty calluses of numbness, cynicism, indifference and denial.

Laments are cries of anguish and outrage, groans of deep pain and grief, utterances of profound protest and righteous indignation over injustice, wails of mourning and sorrow in the face of unbearable suffering. Laments name the present pain, and forthrightly acknowledge that life and relationships have gone terribly wrong. Laments both stem from and lead to deep compassion.

Matthew 18:1-5

At that time the disciples approached Jesus and said, “Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?” He called a child over, placed it in their midst, and said, “Amen, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will not enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whoever receives one child such as this in my name receives me.”

“Nothing is as Important to the Church as Human Life”

Since President Obama’s November 20th announcement of administrative relief, legal service providers have been working overtime to educate communities about policy shifts, the implementation process, and the options available.  Informing the public regarding changes of this magnitude is no small task.

Leviticus 24:22

You shall have but one rule, for alien and native-born alike. I, the LORD, am your God.

Background on Family Detention

The US immigrant detention system grew more than five-fold between 1994 and 2013.

In 1994 the daily detained population on a given day was 6,785 people. By 2013, that number grew to 34,260 – a figure mandated by Congress.

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