Family Detention | CLINIC

Family Detention

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CLINIC Advocacy Director Jill Bussey spoke with the Daily messenger on what is at stake if more humane immigration procedures are not extended to immigrants, especially those held in detention centers.

Read the full article here.

 

In a recently released report by the CARA Pro Bono Family Detention project, many Central American mothers discuss the mistreatment they experienced while detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas. NBC looks further in the actions of the immigration officials. Click here for the full story.  

Abdulmajeed Alhogbani, with contributions by Barrett Bles, recent graduate of CUA Columbus School of Law

“Ok, I’d be willing to stipulate to humanitarian asylum.” We were approximately 30 minutes into the recess the Immigration Judge took, during which we were supposed to negotiate a favorable solution for our client, when DHS said the words we had been waiting to hear since we first met our client in October.

DILLEY, Texas -- Seven women picked up and detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement in early January in widely publicized raids have made a direct and personal appeal to President Barack Obama to allow their release while they pursue ongoing appeals of their deportation orders.

Jennifer Riddle

I had the opportunity to volunteer for a week with the CARA Pro Bono Project which provides legal assistance to women and children detained in the South Texas Family Detention Center. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) erected this facility last year in the desolate town of Dilley (population 3,674). It is managed and operated by a for-profit entity called Corrections Corporation of America.

 
Aminta Menjivar

Interesting are “los caminos de la vida” (the paths of life). Forty-five minutes away from the rural canton where I grew up in El Salvador is a town called Cara Sucia, well known for its market. I loved going to Cara Sucia as a child because we could buy things you couldn’t get anywhere else. My sister and I always loved visiting this tiny stand that sold delicious french fries, prepared crisp and golden with the perfect amount of ketchup, mayonnaise and shredded cheese. I always remembered those fries with fondness, but never thought I would call up such cherished memories in a bleak detention center for immigrant families in South Texas.

H. Andrés Abella

More than 1,400 women and children—mostly from El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala—are detained at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, TX. A significant number of these families come to the United States forced out of their communities by death threats, rape, extortion, or they are running away to keep their children from forced recruitment by the MS-13 or La 18 gangs.