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detention

Prisoners of Domestic Violence Detained in Artesia

There are currently about 539 women and children detained at the temporary family detention center run by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) in Artesia, New Mexico.  This facility is one of three family detention centers currently operating in the United States.  The women and children detained at the facility are asylum seekers and a vast majority of them are survivors of violence and sexual assault.  Having recently returned from Artesia myself, supporting staff and volunteers assisting detainees, my thoughts go out to detained victims of abuse this October, Domestic V

The Human Cost of Family Detention in Artesia and Berks

I recently participated in trips to two of the family detention centers currently managed by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): the Artesia Temporary Facility for Adults with Children in New Mexico and the Berks County Residential Center in Pennsylvania.

Hope for Detainees in Artesia

I was afforded the opportunity to visit Artesia, New Mexico to assist the on-the-ground immigration attorneys providing free legal services to the over 500 detained women and children. The families have fled their home countries in Central America due abject poverty and increased violence.

"Somos Un Pueblo Unido"

"If you listen very closely, you can hear the detained families chanting and yelling along with us.  This was a very moving experience.  Many participants were moved to tears when they heardthe women and children’s voices from the other side of the fence.”  

Faith in Action and Family Detention in Artesia Part 1

Last week, I visited the family detention center in Artesia, New Mexico, and saw first hand how our country is responding to the issue of women and children seeking refuge at our border.  I also had the opportunity to see in action how the Catholic Church is responding to these same women and children.

The Impact of Bad Deportation Practices on Migrants

The evening “Angela,” a woman in her early thirties, arrived at the shelter for women and children in Nogales, Mexico she was desperate to reunite with her husband “Tino” with whom she had traveled North two weeks before.  The couple traversed the Sonora desert together and crossed the border successfully, but were picked up at a Border Patrol checkpoint in Arizona only days after entering the United States.  The pair was separated upon apprehension and that was the last Angela saw of her husband. Angela described her husband to other migrants and service providers.

Luisa’s Story

After crossing the length of Mexico over ground to get to the border, “Luisa,” a 36 year old widow from the indigenous municipality of Tamazulápam de Espíritu Santo in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, and her 20 year old son “Pedro” attempted to cross into the United States by walking through the harsh and unpopulated desert near Nogales, Arizona. Unlike most unauthorized migrants who attempt to cross the U.S. – Mexico border, Luisa and Pedro did not contract the service of a guide.