CLINIC Fellows | CLINIC

CLINIC Fellows

Search by a particular word or phrase.
Search by a particular blog tag.
CLINIC Fellows held their annual in-person meeting at Convening 2017 in Atlanta

CLINIC Fellows held their annual in-person meeting at Convening 2017 in Atlanta

Meet the MSC staff Dorothy Balser, Danna Johnson,
Amelia McGowan and Matthew Young.
Paola Marquez

From new partnerships with law enforcement to increased parish engagement, CLINIC Fellow Matthew Young and the Migrant Support Center have a unique strategy for assisting immigrants in Jackson, Mississippi.

Paola Marquez

Ana Johnson returns to Catholic Charities in Jacksonville excited to finish what she started.

Image of Silvia Arias
Paola Marquez

This month’s featured fellow is Sylvia Arias with Catholic Charities in Biloxi. The Peru native told CLINIC about how she came to work with immigrants and what she finds more rewarding about her job.

Paola Marquez

Susana Caterina Quiroga was born in Puno, Peru on May 25, 1978, not 1943 as her American lawyer indicated on her immigration forms. An attorney herself, Quiroga was wary of her lawyer’s suggestion to sign the forms without looking them over. Trusting her instinct, she insisted despite not fully understanding them; which turned out to be a good idea because she caught the mistake the attorney later blamed on his paralegal. This experience still stands out to her as one of the main reasons she decided to work in immigration.

Image of Monica Callahan
Dianne Kaiyoorawongs

Monica Callahan began working with Catholic Immigration Services of Little Rock as a CLINIC Fellow less than a year ago. She did not have much exposure to the complex issues of immigration law, but was inspired by her background with the Spanish language.

Dianne Kaiyoorawongs

When talking to Lauren Armbrester, our CLINIC Fellow with Catholic Charities of the Diocese of Raleigh, it’s obvious she is passionate about working with immigrants in her community. As a newly accredited BIA representative, she doesn’t view this as just a job, but as a way to live her spirituality.

Picture of Estela Tirado
Dianne Kaiyoorawongs

Estela Tirado, a CLINIC Fellow working with the Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama (HICA), moved to the United States this past September and is excited to have a job she is personally connected to.

Kristen Lionetti

Nathalie Dietrich knows immigration from multiple angles. Although she “never could have imagined that she would be living in the United States” one day, that journey has brought her to advocate for immigrants, first as a volunteer, then as a legal assistant and now as a BIA-accredited representative.

Kristen Lionetti

An immigrant herself, Miriam Martinez understands the challenges her clients face. She was separated from her parents when she was young, had a painful journey to the U.S. as a child and has lived as an undocumented immigrant in the United States.

Kristen Lionetti
This month we introduce you to Claudia Perez, the fellow with Catholic Charities Bureau, Inc. in Jacksonville, Florida.
Kristen Lionetti

This month we introduce you to Matthew Young, the fellow with Catholic Charities of Jackson, Inc. in Jackson, Mississippi.

Kristen Lionetti

This month we would like to introduce Enid Colón, the fellow at Hispanic Services Council in Tampa, Florida. Enid became a fellow in October of 2015, but she had previously been working as the organization’s “intra-agency connector” for more than a year.

Lorenza Ramirez

 

Why does the Southeast need more legal service providers? To understand the need, this blog series took a holistic approach to investigating who is in need, how, and why, from the assessment of the demographic changes to anti-immigrant sentiment. In the final blog post, we will assess how bad that lack actually is, and what exactly CLINIC is going to do about it.

Lorenza Ramirez

So far, we’ve explored the rapid demographic shift of the Southeast region and the emergence of the New Latino South, demonstrating the need for more immigration legal service providers and resources.  But if the growth and impact of this community is evident and felt throughout the region, why aren’t there more legal service providers for immigrants in the Southeast in the first place? 

Lorenza Ramirez

We know immigrants are coming to the Southeast.  But who are they, and from where are they coming?  Seven of the nine U.S. states in which the Latino population more than doubled between 2000 and 2010 are in the Southeast region.  Over one-third come from Mexico. Most immigrants are undocumented and of the undocumented, most are Latino (76.2%).

Lorenza Ramirez

It’s no surprise that immigrants are coming to the United States, and in large numbers: between 1990 and 2013, the number of U.S. immigrants more than doubled as it grew from 19.8 million to 41.3 millionBut have you thought about where in the United States those immigrants are going, and why?

 

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) is pleased to announce the establishment of an innovative program to create capacity for high quality charitable legal immigration services in the southeastern United States. The initiative will build a stronger community of expert service providers in largely underserved states where the population of at-risk immigrants is on the rise.

Blog tags: