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Laura Nino

Responding to heightened anxiety within nearby communities, Catholic Charities of Southeastern Ohio created “Protect Your Neighbor” to help everyone feel more safe.

Meet the MSC staff Dorothy Balser, Danna Johnson,
Amelia McGowan and Matthew Young.
Paola Marquez

From new partnerships with law enforcement to increased parish engagement, CLINIC Fellow Matthew Young and the Migrant Support Center have a unique strategy for assisting immigrants in Jackson, Mississippi.

Credit: Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Boston

Lisa Parisio

Marjean Perhot, director of refugee and immigration services at Catholic Charities Boston, a CLINIC affiliate, shares key strategies for fighting for Temporary Protected Status for Haitians.

Paola Marquez

Ana Johnson returns to Catholic Charities in Jacksonville excited to finish what she started.

Group photo of CLINIC Fellows at Convening 2017
Paola Marquez

As the CLINIC Fellows Program heads into its final months, participants gathered for CLINIC’s 2017 Convening to rejuvenate goals and share strategies. Here are their takeaways.

Letter from City of Dallas letting residents know Catholic Charities was involved
Leya Speasmaker and Brian Tierney

Catholic Charities of Dallas’ Immigration Legal Services program, a CLINIC affiliate, has teamed up with the City of Dallas to protect the rights of immigrant residents who may be forced out of their homes at the end of the 2016-2017 school year.

Paola Marquez

Aliyah Donsky, CLINC Fellow with Catholic Charities New Orleans, describes her decision to work in the immigration field as the result of moral instinct and fruitful circumstance.

 
Leya Speasmaker

Since Mayor John Cranley’s 2015 announcement affirming his commitment to making Cincinnati the most immigrant-friendly city, Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio was at the forefront of this endeavor.

Cranley assembled a task force to write Cincinnati’s welcoming plan, which included creating a community ID as a priority initiative. Alisa Berry, chief operating officer of the CLINIC affiliate, in particular, was instrumental in turning this goal and legislative premise into action.

 
Leya Speasmaker

For 11 years, the Tax EZ program, offered by Catholic Charities of Santa Clara County has helped clients prepare nearly 15,000 returns, generating millions of dollars in refunds.

For the 2016 tax season, Steve Hicken, Division Director of Economic Development Services, shifted the location of services from the Catholic Charities offices to parishes. This approach encourages interactions between newcomers and the people of their new hometowns, epitomizing immigrant integration on the local level. Ultimately, it may also result in higher numbers of tax returns being filed.

 
Leya Speasmaker

In the pretty college town of Ithaca, New York, Sue Chaffee, a BIA accredited representative, heads the Immigrant Services Program of Catholic Charities Tompkins /Tioga.

 
Leya Speasmaker

At the start of 2015, John Cranley, the Mayor of Cincinnati, made public his commitment to make Cincinnati the most immigrant friendly city in the United States. He assembled a taskforce that wrote a plan to make Cincinnati more welcoming for all. A community ID was chosen as a priority initiative. The ID is set to be distributed in the first quarter of 2016. Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio (CCSWOH), and in particular, Ms. Alisa Berry, Chief Operating Officer, have been instrumental in making this goal a reality.

 
Shaila Rahman

Catholic Charities of Orange County (CCOC) is doing an excellent job to build capacity and integrate immigrants into the community in Orange County. This beautiful area on the Southern California coast is very diverse and home to almost one million immigrants. Orange County has one of the highest immigrant populations of any county in the United States. Unfortunately, Orange County is also sorely lacking in immigration legal services and many immigrants in Orange County are not able to access immigration legal assistance.  

Jeff Chenoweth

Reflections on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina elicit dark memories of loss of life, displacement and destruction. But looking back also reminds us of great acts of heroism and abundant generosity. For social and political reasons, we should take a long, hard look back at 2005 and where we are as a nation today. CLINIC looks back and recalls its own response to the destruction and how the Gulf Coast looks today from the perspective of welcoming immigrants and creating opportunities for social integration in the process.

Martin Gauto

The Inland Empire region of Southern California, east of Los Angeles, is home to over one million foreign-born persons. Comprised of Riverside and San Bernardino counties, the Inland Empire (or the “The IE” as it’s known) has a severe shortage of low-cost, professional immigration legal service providers.