Affiliate | CLINIC

Affiliate

Search by a particular word or phrase.
Search by a particular blog tag.
 
Leya Speasmaker

Since Mayor John Cranley’s 2015 announcement affirming his commitment to making Cincinnati the most immigrant-friendly city, Catholic Charities Southwestern Ohio was at the forefront of this endeavor.

Cranley assembled a task force to write Cincinnati’s welcoming plan, which included creating a community ID as a priority initiative. Alisa Berry, chief operating officer of the CLINIC affiliate, in particular, was instrumental in turning this goal and legislative premise into action.

 
Jeff Chenoweth

When one’s friends and relatives -- let alone candidates of public office -- question the benefit of welcoming immigrants separating fact from opinion can be challenging.

Immigration issues are so large and consequential that they require thoughtful and accurate answers to the hostile and manipulative sound bites tossed about by political candidates and pundits.

 
Patricia Zapor

Even before the Paris terrorist attacks in November, a CLINIC affiliate in Biloxi, Mississippi, was getting pushback for processing refugees.

The call by various politicians to make it even more difficult for refugees – particularly Syrians – to be admitted to the United States is causing fallout for several CLINIC affiliates.

 

Through creative programming and a sharp focus on immigrant integration, New American Pathways, an Atlanta-based CLINIC affiliate, contributes immensely to the integration of the 3,500 refugees it serves yearly. New American Pathways was established on October 1, 2014 after two long-standing organizations, Refugee Resettlement and Immigration Services of Atlanta and Refugee Family Services, merged. Capitalizing on their collective expertise in refugee resettlement, New American Pathways is changing its community for the better.

Jeff Chenoweth

Reflections on the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina elicit dark memories of loss of life, displacement and destruction. But looking back also reminds us of great acts of heroism and abundant generosity. For social and political reasons, we should take a long, hard look back at 2005 and where we are as a nation today. CLINIC looks back and recalls its own response to the destruction and how the Gulf Coast looks today from the perspective of welcoming immigrants and creating opportunities for social integration in the process.