Detention and Removal

In late May- early June, the CARA Pro Bono Project assisted 21 families who were picked up by DHS in the latest round of enforcement actions targeting Central American women the children. The stories of the 21 families and the due process obstacles they have encountered were captured in a report produced by the CARA project.

Cover page of El proceso en la corte de inmigración

CLINIC and ASAP created guidance in Spanish for the Immigrant Justice Corps to distribute at the New York City Immigration Court to the Central American asylum-seeking mothers and children in deportation proceedings.

Download the guide.

Spring 2016 marked the one-year anniversary of the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project with some impressive data to add a bit of hope to the still steady flow of immigrants across the border. The project’s one-year statistics paint a powerful picture of the work being done by volunteers and the limited formal staff at CARA.

Brief on the recent apprehension of Central American asylum-seeking 21 families and explanation on the access to justice issues families have faced in the United States.

Download the Brief

March marked the one year anniversary of the CARA Pro Bono Representation Family Detention Project, which focuses on ending family detention and ensuring representation for immigrant families who are processed through the family detention facilities. Nearly 8,000 families had a CARA volunteer attorney help them start the process of seeking asylum. More than 700 volunteers from all over the country -- lawyers, paralegals, translators, social workers, medical professionals, teachers and more -- put their lives on hold for a week or more and traveled to Texas to help protect families. Combined, they contributed more than $6.75 million in volunteer hours.

In early January, the Department of Homeland Security began targeting for removal Central American families and unaccompanied children who had turned 18. CLINIC engaged in extensive national and local advocacy, with staff from the Advocacy and TLS offices participating in national webinars about the actions. The CLINIC advocacy team conducted webinars for the Archdiocese of Cincinnati, Ohio, and the Diocese of Charlotte, North Carolina, and provided advocacy support for communities in Arkansas, California, Ohio and Virginia. DHS continues to target immigrant families and unaccompanied children who have turned 18 while in the United States.

CLINIC continues to fight against the government’s practice of detaining immigrant mothers and their children. CLINIC, through its work in the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project has been especially active in the national fight to eliminate large scale family detention centers. CLINIC and CARA have been leading advocacy efforts to challenge unlawful asylum, detention, and deportation policies of DHS. Such advocacy activities have included submitting a complaint to the DHS Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties (CRCL) regarding inadequate language access for indigenous language speakers and filing a letter to high-level DHS officials about glaring due process violations that have occurred since the court order of October 23rd.

From January 2- 4, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) conducted enforcement actions targeting immigrants who arrived to the United States after January 1, 2014, and had final orders of removal. DHS picked up 121 individuals in local communities in Georgia, North Carolina, and Texas. CLINIC responded to these action by writing a a letter to DHS Secretary Jeh Johnson, condemning the targeting of Central American women and children and urging an end to the practice, putting together a a backgrounder explaining the recent actions and what to do in your community, and, through its partnership with the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Project, help receive stays of deportation from the Board of Immigration Appeals in twelve cases, affecting thirty-three women and children. CLINIC continues to monitor this issue and will appreciate hearing what is occurring in your community.

Cover of 8 Ways You Can Help Central American Women and Children

CLINIC advocates for the end of the U.S. policy of detaining families who arrive in the U.S. seeking protection from crime and violence in their home countries. It also participates in the CARA Family Detention Pro Bono Representation and Advocacy Project, working to provide legal representation to these families.

On October 16th, 2015, CLINIC along with more than 140 organizations and individuals, sent a letter to Texas state officials urging them to deny child care licenses to private prison companies operating two family detention camps in South Texas. The letter sent to Texas Governor Greg Abbott and Texas Department of Family and Protective Services Commissioner John Specia argued that the family detention facilities, by their nature, do not foster child welfare.

On July 24, 2015, Judge Dolly Gee of the United States District Court for the Central District of California issued a long-awaited decision applying the Flores Settlement Agreement of 1997 to the minors currently detained in Dilley and Karnes City, Texas, and in Leesport, Pennsylvania.

March 17, 2015

 

President Barack Obama The White House

1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC  20500

 

Dear Mr. President,

Appointed Counsel and Bond Hearings for the Mentally Disabled

By Debbie Smith

Held on October 12, 2012.
Your client isn't sure what happened at the border when she tried to enter several years ago and didn't succeed. How do you determine what actually occurred at the border? Was there a removal order at all? If so, what kind?

On November 20, 2014, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced new immigration enforcement priorities in a memorandum entitled Policies for the Apprehension, Detention, and Removal of Undocumented Immigrants. The guidance sets forth factors DHS should consider when deciding whether an individual is an enforcement priority or warrants a favorable exercise of prosecutorial discretion. The government documents, articles, sample requests and motions, and other materials contained in this toolkit will help advocates understand prosecutorial discretion policies ---- who can benefit, what is the process, and how to assist clients both before and after the issuance of the Notice to Appear.

"We call on the administration to prioritize release of immigrant families in all cases. We
urge the administration to assign social workers to manage familiesʼ cases rather than
placing them in detention. For families without housing, the administration should
partner with non-profit shelter or child welfare organizations experienced in supporting
asylum-seeking and immigrant families to resolve any issues preventing the direct
release of families. Social workers with proven track records providing family and child

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has dramatically stepped up enforcement in the interior of the country. DHS agents of the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Division are arresting immigrants at their homes, workplaces and on the streets in communities all across the country.

In 2000-2001, CLINIC published a series of reports on immigration issues based on numerous case studies. These are not current reports.

The reports identify, track, and examine the impact of our nation's laws and immigration policies on at-risk immigrants. They illustrate particularly compelling problems faced by immigrants, clear explanations of the law at the root of such problems, and other research.