Comprehensive Immigration Reform

Read about the government launching an overseas processing program for certain central american refugee children, find out who's accredited for the month, and see the study that indicates a significant percentage of unauthorized immigrants may be eligible for permanent status.

 

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On September 9, 2014, Most Reverend Eusebio Elizondo, Chairman of the Committee on Migration of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), and Most Reverend Kevin W. Vann, Chairman of board of directors of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) implored Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson to work with the President to authorize deferred action for deserving groups.

In order to pass comprehensive immigration reform, increased awareness among the public, particularly voters, is essential.  These materials are provided to help the reader in gaining more awareness and being a public voice promoting immigration reform.

By Donald Kerwin and Laureen Laglagaron

 

Summary:

While comprehensive immigration reform may have moved to the back burner politically, Congress ultimately will need to reform US immigration policy as immigration enforcement alone will not prove effective in dealing with the nation’s estimated 11.1 million unauthorized immigrants.

By Peggy Gleason

As you know, the House and Senate are scheduled to negotiate a compromise that could produce a comprehensive immigration reform bill.  For the first time since the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986, legalization may become law.  Without knowing exactly what will pass, it is difficult to plan for our programs.  However, we know the rough outlines of the possible legislation and we can mine our own experiences for concrete preparation steps we can take now.

By Peggy Gleason

 

Regardless of what legalization program is eventually enacted and implemented, applicants will need to submit supporting documents to establish that they qualify. What documents are likely to be needed? What is the best way to organize them? How should clients now be counseled on ways to gather these documents? By looking at the prior legalization under the Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) of 1986, and at the current proposals, we can estimate what may be required once a new legalization program is enacted.

By Donald Kerwin and Charles Wheeler

 

This article originally appeared in Issues in Immigration, Vol. 1 (Center for Migration Studies, 2004). It was reprinted by Bender’s Immigration Bulletin, Vol. 12, No. 3 (Feb. 1, 2007).

 

A naturalization group application workshop is a one-day community event that brings professionals and trained volunteers together to assist Lawful Permanent Residents in completing the Application for Naturalization (N-400). The workshop is an essential tool for efficiently and effectively providing naturalization assistance to large numbers of people. The success of the workshop model depends on careful planning, thorough training of staff and volunteers, and high quality services. The purpose of this toolkit is to help charitable immigration programs achieve a successful workshop.

Webinar held on 11/1/13
This webinar will look at the legislation and politics which will shape the debate on immigration reform in the House of Representatives, explaining the Church’s position on individual bills and the strategy for winning final legislation the Church can support.

In recent years, more than 24,000 people from over 100 nations have been granted asylum in the United States. Asylees have often suffered from persecution in their country of origin, forced migration, detention in the United States, and the uncertainty of the asylum adjudication process. Most confront systemic and bureaucratic barriers to resettlement and integration, and need well-coordinated and prompt social services to ease their transition.

In 2013, the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. (CLINIC) commissioned the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) at Georgetown University to complete a study estimating the size, characteristics, and geographic distribution of the U.S. undocumented (i.e., non-citizens who are not temporary migrants such as students, diplomats, short-term visitors, etc., those who are legal permanent residents, or refugees or asylees). This is similar to a study conducted by CARA for CLINIC in 2006 using 2005 data. CARA used current data from the U.S.

Held on May 6, 2013.

Legislation was introduced in the Senate today that would create a pathway to citizenship for most of the undocumented persons living in the United States.  It would also overhaul the family-based immigration system, create new opportunities for guest workers and other nonimmigrants, and impose heightened border, interior, and workplace enforcement.  Listen as CLINIC staff summarizes the most important parts of the proposed legislation on this free, one-hour webinar.

Citizenship for Elders is a unique handbook for teachers and administrators on creating and managing a citizenship program for the older learner.  This handbook brings together the observations and insights of teachers from across the country on older learners from a wide range of cultures.  It is based on a nationwide survey of 200 programs.  It identifies the issues in teaching elders and makes recommendations for instruction and program design.  The recommendations are practice-based, with a focus on innovative and promising practices.  The suggestions on learning activities, c

The documents below are designed to provide you with a template that can be used when applying for immigration funding, specifically in preparing your local community for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR).  It can also be adapted for other immigration-related funding prior to CIR.

The manual, Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform: An Earned Pathway to Citizenship and Beyond offers recommendations from “veterans” of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA).

On May 10, 2005, the U.S. Catholic Bishops launched the Justice for Immigrants (JFI) Campaign in an effort to educate Catholics, including Catholic public officials, and other people of good will, about Catholic social teaching concerning immigrants.  The goals of the Campaign are to raise the awareness about the positive contributions of immigrants to our society and to advocate for changes in immigration law.  Congress should provide an orderly and safe pathway for undocumented people to integrate into our society.

In 2000-2001, CLINIC published a series of reports on immigration issues based on numerous case studies. These are not current reports.

The reports identify, track, and examine the impact of our nation's laws and immigration policies on at-risk immigrants. They illustrate particularly compelling problems faced by immigrants, clear explanations of the law at the root of such problems, and other research.