Immigrant Integration

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Center for Immigrant Integration

The Center for Immigrant Integration seeks to encourage the development of immigrant integration initiatives throughout its network through the creation of resources and trainings and through the dissemination of best practices currently present in CLINIC affiliate agencies. CLINIC believes that efforts to promote immigrant integration are most successful at the local level. Participation in integration initiatives is required from both the newcomer and the receiving community, as integration takes place at Catholic Charities agencies as well as in the parish halls, in parks and city office buildings, in libraries, and in neighborhood schools. The message of welcoming the stranger is never more needed than right now, as legislative debates continue around measures impacting immigrant communities; charitable legal service programs are experiencing more demand than they can serve; and demographics of cities, large and small, are changing to include the nation’s newcomers.

 

Check back often for new resources, model program highlights, and archived trainings as CLINIC works to assist its network in building welcoming communities around the nation.


“Where migrants and refugees are concerned, the Church and her various agencies ought to avoid offering charitable services alone; they are also called to promote real integration in a society where all are active members and responsible for one another‘s welfare, generously offering a creative contribution and rightfully sharing in the same rights and duties. Emigrants bring with them a sense of trust and hope which has inspired and sustained their search for better opportunities in life.”

- Pope Benedict, Message for 2013 World Day of Migrants and Refugees

 

 

Listen as CLINIC’s Executive Director, Jeanne Atkinson, explains why CLINIC views immigrant integration as a priority for the CLINIC network.

 

 

For more information on how your program can promote immigrant integration, or to have an integration initiative highlighted on our website, contact Leya Speasmaker, Integration Program Manager, at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org or 301-565-4816.

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Big Changes to the Visa Bulletin and Eligibility to File for Adjustment

Charles Wheeler

The October Visa Bulletin contains an important change in the timing of when family- and employment-based immigrant visa applicants can apply for adjustment of status. Under the current system, family-based applicants in the preference categories can only apply for adjustment of status only when their priority date – the date their I-130 petition was filed – becomes “current,” or the visa number becomes “available,” as determined by the Visa Bulletin. Preference category applicants include the spouse and unmarried children of LPRs, and the married or unmarried sons and daughters and siblings of U.S. citizens. A priority date is current if it is before the date listed in the Visa Bulletin for the appropriate country and preference category. Under the new system, the agency is creating a separate “filing date,” which is several months before the “final action date.” The applicant will be allowed to apply for adjustment of status if his or her priority date is before the filing date.

So starting in October, Visa Bulletins will include two charts for family-based immigrants and two charts for employment-based immigrants. One is what we have been accustomed to and which defines when a visa is available for purposes of eligibility to be granted adjustment of status or an immigrant visa. This chart now designates “final action dates.” A second, and new chart, now includes another set of cut-off dates and is known as “filing dates.” This chart now determines when the person may file for adjustment of status and guides the State Department as to when to begin consular processing.

Take the following example. An LPR petitioned for his Mexican spouse, Maria, on February 27, 2015. The October 2015 Visa Bulletin final action date chart shows that those in the F-2A category from Mexico with a priority date before March 1, 2014 would be considered “current.” Under the system in place before October, only those who had a priority date before March 1, 2014 would have been allowed to file for adjustment of status. But under the new system, which includes a new “filing date,” Maria is allowed to file for adjustment of status much earlier. The filing date for Mexicans in the F-2A category, according to the October 2015 Visa Bulletin, is March 1, 2015. Since Maria’s priority date precedes that date, she is now eligible to file for adjustment of status.

This new system mainly affects applicants for adjustment of status. The National Visa Center is responsible for notifying the immigrant visa applicant and starting the consular processing stage. The NVC typically does this several months in advance of the priority date becoming current using internal guidelines as to when to start that process. The new system will more formally guide the NVC on when to initiate consular processing.  But the big change is that it will allow adjustment of status applicants to file their I-485 application and accompanying forms and receive auxiliary benefits, such as employment authorization and advance parole, much earlier than they would have under the current system.

The new system may affect adjustment of status applicants in a number of other ways. For example, all adjustment applicants currently need to include an affidavit of support with the adjustment packet. If the adjustment interview is not scheduled until the “final action date” becomes current, then more than one year may transpire. This may require updating the I-864 with current income and financial eligibility proof. But it may also allow those who needed to rely on a joint sponsor at the time of filing for adjustment to withdraw that I-864 and proceed simply with the petitioner’s updated affidavit of support.Since the adjustment applicant is allowed to work during that year-long period, and his or her income can be included as part of the total household income of the petitioner/sponsor, this may obviate the need to use a joint sponsor.

Another effect of this new system is to increase the number of potential applicants for adjustment of status. Under INA § 245(c), eligibility to file for adjustment of status for those in the preference categories requires nonimmigrants to have always remained in valid nonimmigrant status. As a result, preference immigrants who ever overstayed the period of time authorized on the I-94 entry document, worked without authorization, or dropped out of school if in F-1 status are ineligible to adjust under INA § 245(a). With the new “two-tiered” priority date system, it will be easier for certain nonimmigrants to remain in status until they are eligible to file for adjustment. Take the example above of Maria, who entered the United States on a B-1/B-2 visa (obtained presumably before her marriage) on April 15, 2015 and was allowed to stay for six months, or until October 15, 2015. Beginning October 1, 2015, she can file for adjustment until the time on her I-94 runs out, since she would not yet have violated her nonimmigrant status. Under the current system, she would have either overstayed her I-94 by the time the priority date became current, successfully obtained numerous extensions, or have left the country.

Another way this new system affects adjustment applicants relates to the Child Status Protection Act. The CSPA allows the beneficiary to use an adjusted age calculation on the day the priority date becomes current.  The adjusted age is calculated on that date by subtracting the number of days the I-130 petition was pending from the child’s biological age. Adding a new “filing date” for adjustment purposes does not affect the age calculation. But it does affect compliance with the one-year filing requirement. Those in the preference categories who are able to preserve their “under 21” child status through age adjustment calculation – and thus remain classified in the F-2A category or as a derivative – also need to file for an immigrant visa or adjustment of status (or file a Form I-824) within one year of the priority date becoming current. Under the new system, the child can apply for adjustment of status much earlier – in fact months before the priority date becomes curren t.Filing the I-485 before the priority date becomes current also satisfies the one-year requirement. This will ensure that more beneficiaries will satisfy the requirement and that fewer will be affected by subsequent visa retrogression.

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CLINIC Newsletter - March 2015 - VOL. XIX No. 3

In this issue…         

In-Country Refugee Processing: What Can You Do?

Immigration Law Updates

News From the Catholic Network

Question Corner

Center for Immigrant Integration

Technical Assistance and Trainings

Visa Bulletin

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Webinar: The Role of Public Libraries in Naturalization

Did you know that public libraries in your community can help with your program’s naturalization efforts? Join us for a free webinar to learn how libraries are prepared to support the immigrant community. We will discuss how and why libraries make a strong partner in citizenship efforts; what resources and programmatic support are available to libraries; things to consider when your program is pursuing a partnership with a library; and what efforts exist at the federal level to promote this partnership. The moderators are Laura Burdick, CLINIC Field Support Coordinator and Leya Speasmaker, CLINIC Integration Program Manager. Presenters will include staff from the USCIS Office of Citizenship and CLINIC affiliate agencies.

 

Held March 9th, 2015

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New Capacity Building and Immigrant Integration Resources

By Leya Speasmaker

Immigrant integration is the ultimate goal of the work the CLINIC network does each day as our affiliates assist eligible immigrants to pursue immigration benefits. CLINIC announces the creation of new tools designed to help your program promote and encourage immigrant integration within your community.  Two new self assessment tools are now available on our website.

  • The Immigration Legal Program Management Self Assessment is a useful way to evaluate progress towards implementation of the seven areas which CLINIC views as strong indicators of a successful, charitable legal immigration program.  CLINIC offers this self assessment tool to identify program strengths and weaknesses so that improvements can be targeted and purposefully undertaken.

CLINIC has also consolidated all its resources on immigrant integration into one place on our website.

Additionally, CLINIC's Core Standards have been revised to include immigrant integration recommendations for all programs to pursue.

CLINIC would like to assist you in developing immigrant integration programs. If you would like your program highlighted, or if you are interested in learning more about immigrant integration or how to develop program outcomes related to immigrant integration, please contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org. We will continue to update the website, so please check back often. If there are resources that you would like to see CLINIC offer, please let Leya know.

Please inform all agency staff engaged in serving the foreign born, as we are not just offering this to legal staff but all those who serve immigrants in their daily work.

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Assisting Clients in Complying with Tax Filing Requirements

Employed immigrants, regardless of status or documents used to acquire employment, are required to file taxes. Service providers working with the foreign-born can offer tax assistance preparation and support as their clients work to fulfill this federal requirement. Those without a Social Security Number can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to use when filing taxes. Please see the federal government’s resources on applying for and using the ITIN below.

 

Assisting immigrants in applying for and using an ITIN is a powerful way of encouraging a culture that promotes immigrant integration within your agency. Naturalization applicants are required to show good moral character, and demonstrating through their tax history that they have complied with federal and state tax filing requirements is a great way to meet this requirement.  Big changes to immigration legislation in the future will likely require applicants to prove good moral character and that they have been filing tax returns.  Encouraging potential applicants to file now will help them be ready when a bill passes. 

 

Resources from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Applying for and Using an ITIN:

 

In English:

 

2013 ITIN Updated Procedures Frequently Asked Questions

Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN)

 

In Spanish:

 

Número de Identificación Personal del Contribuyente (ITIN)

Información General sobre el ITIN

 

For more information and ideas on promoting immigrant integration within your community, please see CLINIC’s Building Welcoming Communities webpage. You may also contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org with any questions or comments.  For more information about preparing for legalization, contact Michelle Sardone, CLINIC’s Legalization Program Director, at msardone@cliniclegal.org

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Assisting Clients in Complying with Tax Filing Requirements

Employed immigrants, regardless of status or documents used to acquire employment, are required to file taxes. Service providers working with the foreign-born can offer tax assistance preparation and support as their clients work to fulfill this federal requirement. Those without a Social Security Number can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to use when filing taxes. Please see the federal government’s resources on applying for and using the ITIN below.

Assisting immigrants in applying for and using an ITIN is a powerful way of encouraging a culture that promotes immigrant integration within your agency. Naturalization applicants are required to show good moral character, and demonstrating through their tax history that they have complied with federal and state tax filing requirements is a great way to meet this requirement.  Big changes to immigration legislation in the future will likely require applicants to prove good moral character and that they have been filing tax returns.  Encouraging potential applicants to file now will help them be ready when a bill passes. 

 

Resources from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Applying for and Using an ITIN:

In English:

 

In Spanish:

 

For more information and ideas on promoting immigrant integration within your community, please see CLINIC’s Building Welcoming Communities webpage. You may also contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org with any questions or comments.  For more information about preparing for legalization, contact Michelle Sardone, CLINIC’s Legalization Program Director, at msardone@cliniclegal.org

 

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Partnership Toolkit

Partnerships are a valuable tool for any organization looking to expand or strengthen services in the community. In a well-functioning partnership, all members contribute ideas to the group, coordinate dates and events so that all can participate, and mutually benefit from the partnership. There are several ways to establish a partnership and many tools to use that can help organize and manage the operations.  This toolkit includes sample materials for managing a partnership, guidelines for working within a partnership, and tips on what to look for in a potential partner.

 

Please contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org if you have any questions or comments about this toolkit.

 

Download this Toolkit!

 

 

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Creating a Workplace ELL Program

Low English language proficiency impacts employee productivity, safety, and retention. Federal and state governments provide only a fraction of the funding needed for English language classes, and businesses have both the space and the financial means to offer this benefit to their Limited English Proficient workers. CLINIC offers the following resource to programs interested in pursuing partnerships with local employers willing to offer English language classes to their employees.  The Creating a Workplace ELL Program toolkit includes program planning documents, examples of currently operating workplace ELL programs, sample marketing materials, and other resources to assist in implementing a workplace ELL program. 

 

Also see CLINIC’s Creating a Citizenship Preparation Program for information on implementing a legal and language program in-house.

Click on the chapters below to read sections of the Creating a Workplace ELL Program or click here for the entire document.

Program Planning

I.    The Need for Workplace ELL
II.    Benefits of Workplace English Language Training
III.    Program Needs for Workplace ELL Programs
IV.    Planning for your Workplace ELL Program
V.    Sample Workplace ELL Program Model
VI.    Examples of Workplace ELL Programs

Planning for your Workplace ELL ProgramsTools and Other Materials

VII.    Tips for Approaching an Employer (RefugeeWorks)
VIII.   Tackling Employer Concerns (RefugeeWorks)
IX.      Sample Cover Letter to a Prospective Employer
X.       Workplace ELL Program Survey for Teachers
XI.      Workplace ELL Program Survey for Employers
XII.     Workplace ELL Resources (USCIS and others)
XIII.    Workplace ELL Sample Materials

Questions? Contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

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Harnessing the Power of Partnerships

Held April 22 2013

This webinar training covers how to develop and use partnerships effectively and what resources you can use to manage them. Programs already benefitting from strong partnerships talk about their experiences and provide tips on how to seek out and pursue this type of working relationship. We also talk about how best to reduce the impact of notarios and encourage immigrants to seek out authorized immigration legal services.

Copies of the presentation slides can be found by clicking HERE, or downloaded below.

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Asylee Information

In recent years, more than 24,000 people from over 100 nations have been granted asylum in the United States. Asylees have often suffered from persecution in their country of origin, forced migration, detention in the United States, and the uncertainty of the asylum adjudication process. Most confront systemic and bureaucratic barriers to resettlement and integration, and need well-coordinated and prompt social services to ease their transition.

CLINIC's National Asylee Information and Referral Line, which operated for 11 years, from 2001 to 2012, referred asylees to more than 500 local providers of resettlement services such as English language classes, job placement assistance, temporary cash assistance, and medical assistance. Funded by the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) and operated by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York, the referral line provided a single, centralized source of accurate information about service eligibility and programs across the country that assist asylees with the resources they need for a smooth adjustment and early self-sufficiency.  Referral line counselors spoke 18 languages, including English, Spanish, Haitian-Creole, Chinese, French, Russian, and Arabic.

Over its 11 year history, the referral line project:

  • Provided one-on-one help to over 39,000 asylees (about 300 per month).
  • Created and maintained an up-to-date referral database (the first of its kind) of more than 500 local refugee service providers throughout the U.S.
  • Placed outreach information in the regional USCIS asylum offices and improved outreach to asylees in the immigration courts.
  • Created an informational guide to assist service providers who work with asylees. The guide contains information about the benefits and services for which asylees are eligible, including temporary cash and medical assistance, employment assistance, English classes, employment authorization, Social Security cards, I-94s, adjustment of status, travel authorization, change of address, family reunification, and federal student financial aid.


*** PLEASE NOTE THAT THE 1-800 NUMBER IS NO LONGER IN OPERATION.  ASYLEES SEEKING INFORMATION SHOULD VISIT THE ORR WEBPAGE

 

RESOURCES

Benefits & Services

CLINIC guide, Asylee Eligibility for Resettlement Assistance 

ORR outreach flyer for asylees (available in 9 languages)

USCIS fee waiver application, Form I-912

USCIS policy guidance on fee waivers, March 2011

USCIS fact sheet on asylee travel

 

General Information

DHS Office of Immigration Statistics 2012 annual flow report on refugees and asylees

Executive Office for Immigration Review asylum statistics

USCIS asylum page

ORR policy memoranda on asylees

 

For more information about this project, please contact Laura Burdick at lburdick@cliniclegal.org.

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Welcoming the Stranger through Immigrant Integration (Sept 2013)

Welcoming the Stranger through Immigrant Integration discusses five state-level legislative initiatives that promote the integration of immigrants into our states and communities.  The integration measures discussed include legislation that creates tuition equity for all; strengthens human trafficking laws; invests in English language instruction; uses the budget process to integrate immigrants; and enhances access to financial aid and protection against immigration consultant fraud. The document includes model language and talking points that advocates can use to educate legislators about the benefits of integration measures.

 

 

 

Welcoming the Stranger through Immigrant Integration (PDF)

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Volunteer Management Toolkit

Many tasks in an immigration legal services program can be completed by volunteers. Using volunteers when possible frees up staff time that can be devoted to offering more services to clients. This toolkit contains helpful information on how best to use volunteers in your program, how to recruit and retain volunteers, and how to incorporate them into your program’s plan for the passage of Comprehensive Immigration Reform. Sample forms are included as well as sample volunteer job descriptions.

If you have questions regarding this toolkit, please send these to Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org

 

Overview of Volunteer Management

10 Reasons to Use Volunteers for Charitable Immigration Legal Services

10 Considerations When Working with Volunteers

Best Practices for Volunteer Management

The Case for Hiring a Volunteer Manager

 

Needs Assessment: Determining Agency Volunteer Roles

What Volunteers Can and Can’t Do in Legal Work

10 Tasks for a Volunteer in Your Legal Office

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Summer Legal Intern)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Legal Intern)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Naturalization Tutor)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Civics-Based ESL and Citizenship Instructor )

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Pro Bono Attorney)

Volunteer Roles and Sample Job Description (Workshop Volunteer)

 

Recruitment, Matching and Screening 

Where to Find Volunteers

Sample Volunteer Application and Acknowledgement Form

Sample Volunteer Confidentiality Agreement

 

Training and BIA Accreditation

Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Accreditation for Volunteers

Training Opportunities for Prospective BIA Applicants

 

Superivision and Motivation

Giving Feedback to Volunteers

Managing a Difficult Volunteer

Sample Evaluation of Volunteers

How to Recognize and Appreciate Volunteers

 

Tools for Effective Volunteer Management

Technology Tools for Volunteer Work

Resources for Future Exploration

 

Pro Bono Specific Resources

CLINIC Webinar Using Pro Bono to Maximize Resources

CLINIC Webinar Pro Bono Development

CLINIC Webinar Partnering with Law Schools

Sample Guidelines for Pro Bono Representation (Courtesy of Esperanza Immigrant Rights Project)

Sample Pro Bono Attorney Guidelines (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center)

Sample Pro Bono Retainer Agreement (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center) 

Sample Pro Bono Case Summary (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center)  

Sample Pro Bono Project Newsletter (Courtesy of National Immigrant Justice Center)  

Other Pro Bono Resources

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Citizenship for Elders: Issues and Options in Test Preparation

The citizenship test, especially the English language requirement, often poses a major challenge for older applicants.  How can citizenship teachers and program administrators best meet the special needs of an older learner?  What are the best strategies for success?  Join us for this webinar about promising practices in instruction and program design for elders in your community.  We will also discuss suggestions for learning activities, cultural considerations, and strategies to address common health issues.  This webinar is based on CLINIC's handbook by the same title, which is being updated for release of a second edition shortly.  CLINIC Field Support Coordinators Leya Speasmaker and Laura Burdick present together with local agency staff.

Held on June 28, 2012.

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Toolkit: 

Citizenship for Elders: Issues and Options in Test Preparation, 2nd Edition (2012)

Citizenship for Elders is a unique handbook for teachers and administrators on creating and managing a citizenship program for the older learner.  This handbook brings together the observations and insights of teachers from across the country on older learners from a wide range of cultures.  It is based on a nationwide survey of 200 programs.  It identifies the issues in teaching elders and makes recommendations for instruction and program design.  The recommendations are practice-based, with a focus on innovative and promising practices.  The suggestions on learning activities, cultural considerations for the classroom, and strategies to address common health issues will be particularly helpful to teachers.  CLINIC hopes this free handbook will help service providers strengthen their programs and assist many more elders to secure their future in the U.S. by becoming citizens.

Click Here to View "Citizenship for Elders"

Spotlight on Integration: 6 Part Series

Looking for ideas to promote and encourage immigrant integration within your community? CLINIC offers this 6 part series that spotlights immigrant integration initiatives across our network. Learn the definition of immigrant integration, its importance for our network and nation, and how it can be promoted locally. Featured programs encourage relationships between the receiving community and immigrants, give elderly refugees a place to use skills gained in their home countries, and connect asylees with available resources.

Please contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org if you would like for one of your projects to receive the spotlight.

 

Spotlight on Integration:  October 2010
Immigrant Integration and Why it Deserves the Spotlight

Spotlight on Integration:  November 2010
St. James English as a Second Language Program in Seattle, Washington

Spotlight on Integration:  December 2010
New York State Immigration Hotline and the ORR National Asylee Information and Referral Hotline, Catholic Charities Community Services in New York City, New York

Spotlight on Integration:  January 2011
Garden Project for Older Adult Refugees, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Milwaukee, Inc. in Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Spotlight on Integration:  February 2011
Institute for the Hispanic Family, Catholic Charities of Hartford in Hartford, Connecticut

Spotlight on Integration:  March 2011
The Borromeo Legal Project, St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church in Arlington, VA

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Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit

Citizenship test preparation and quality legal services go hand in hand in assisting an immigrant along the path to citizenship. A prospective bill for comprehensive immigration reform will most likely bring changes in legal and language requirements for citizenship. It is the job of all legal service providers and teaching professionals working with the foreign born to anticipate these requirements and prepare clients in advance. The Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit will be helpful to anyone seeking ways to better serve the foreign born as they prepare to naturalize.

Please also see CLINIC’s Creating a Workplace ELL Program for information on how to partner with local businesses and implement a workplace English Language Learning program.

Click on the chapters below to read sections of the Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit

  1. Introduction: Tools for a Legal Program Interested in Starting a Citizenship Program - Designed for legal immigration programs interested in creating a citizenship program.
  2. A Client’s  Road to Citizenship - Follow the client’s road to citizenship with this chart that details the step-by-step process a client follows in order to become a U.S. citizen.
  3. Program Needs for Legal and Language Service Programs Combined - Compare the programmatic and equipment needs for legal and language programs, and learn what components of these two programs can be shared.
  4. Citizenship Program Models - Many citizenship programs start small and grow over time. This chart will identify easy services to implement now plus provide ideas for services to plan for in the future.
  5. Planning for a Citizenship Program - Creating a legal and language service program requires a lot of planning and thought. A sample Logic Model is provided to assist program development and a blank template can be printed for individual use.
  6. Program Development - Funding must be considered when planning to open a new program or to offer new services. Use this resource to learn about possible program standards required by funders as well as potential sources of funding.
  7. Integrating Technology into your Program - The use of technology is becoming increasingly important in the legal and language services field. This chart will pinpoint technological advances and improvements programs can make today and into the future.
  8. Sample Course Outlines for Citizenship Class - Click here to view sample course outlines for both ELL-based civics classes and citizenship classes.  
  9. Training  and other Resources - Visit this page to access resources that can be used for planning legal and language service programs.
  10. FAQs - Find answers to the most frequently asked questions regarding a citizenship preparation program.
  11. Terminology - Learn the definitions of commonly used terms and acronyms.

Questions? Contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org.

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How to Establish and Develop a Successful ESL Program

Held Nov. 16, 2010

Due to an increasing need for quality English as a Second Language (ESL) and Citizenship Test Preparation classes, many community-based organizations are interested in starting their own language learning programs. Combining CLINIC’s key components for program management and Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages’ (TESOL) Standards for Adult Education ESL Programs, this Webinar will provide a foundation for interested organizations to plan and implement a language learning program. Instructor: Leya Speasmaker.

To download the presentation, click here.

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Template for Applying for Immigration Funding

The documents below are designed to provide you with a template that can be used when applying for immigration funding, specifically in preparing your local community for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR).  It can also be adapted for other immigration-related funding prior to CIR.

This template has several sections. It outlines the Need and Approach to positioning your agency as the lead in preparing your community for CIR. Objectives and outcomes are included.  A separate Excel sheet Workplan details activities and a timeline associated with the objectives.  Guidelines are also provided for an organizational capability statement. The attachments contain resources that you may find useful.

*To better understand, other programmatic needs and changes related to Comprehensive Immigration Reform, please review CLINIC's publication Preparing for Comprehensive Immigration Reform: An Earned Pathway to Citizenship and Beyond.
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The Mechanics of English Language Learning

Held October 21, 2010

This is part 2 of a 3-part series on language access.

English Language Learners (ELL) make up a large percentage of the total number of adult learners in classrooms around the United States. These learners face unique challenges in their educational pursuits. This Webinar will explain how the adult brain learns, what challenges an ELL faces inside and outside of the classroom, and how a program might overcome these obstacles. Program Representatives will present their own experiences in offering an ESL program in their community and share what they have learned in the process.  Presenters: Dr. Patricia Maloof and Leya Speasmaker, both of CLINIC.

To download the Power Point presentation, please click here.

Part I: Language Access: Effectively Serving Limited and Non-English Speakers (October 5, 2010).

Part II: How to Establish and Develop a Successful ESL Program at Your Agency (Nov. 16, 2010)

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Language Access: Effectively Serving Limited- and Non-English Speakers

Language Access: Effectively Serving Limited- and Non-English Speakers

This is part 1 of a 3-part series on language access.

Does your agency have a legal obligation to provide interpretation or translation services to the people that you serve? Do language barriers prevent your clients from accessing critical information and services such as the legal system, emergency medical care, schools, firefighters or police? This Webinar will explain the laws that entitle limited- and non-English speakers to interpreters and that legally obligate organizations to provide individuals with language access. Learn how to ensure that your clients’ language access rights are fulfilled and how to develop an effective language access strategy for your agency.

To download the Power Point presentation, click here.

Held October 5, 2010

 

Part II - The Mechanics of English Language Learning

Part III - How to Establish and Develop a Successful ESL Program at Your Agency 

 

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Catholic Social Teaching and Migration Presentation

This presentation, which was first given in July 2008, gives an overview of Catholic social teaching on migration. Topics include:

  • Who is my neighbor? How can I be a neighbor?;
  • Principles of Catholic social teaching;
  • The dignity of the person and respect for life;
  • Community and the common good;
  • God-given rights and responsibilities;
  • Preferential option (decision) for the poor;
  • Dignity of work;
  • Solidarity and the human family;
  • Care for God's creation;
  • And much more.
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Translations of Citizenship Test Questions

Translations of the U.S. History/Government Test Questions

The translations listed here were completed by USCIS and community organizations throughout the country. For translations completed by community organizations, the organization's contact information is included on the translation.

***Please note that some information, such as the name of the President and Speaker of the House, changes regularly and may not be up to date. Other information, such as the name of the applicant’s Senator and Governor, will vary depending on where the applicant lives. 

Translations done by USCIS

 

Translations done by community organizations 

 

CLINIC Study Guide for the Citizenship Test

 

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Individual Tax Identification Numbers (ITIN): Practical Guidelines for Individuals

What is an ITIN?

ITIN stands for Individual Tax Identification Number. It is a nine-digit number issued by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) to individuals who do not qualify for a Social Security Number (SSN). The ITIN always begins with the number 9 and has a 7 or 8 in the fourth digit. For example: 9XX-7X-XXXX.

An ITIN permits individuals without a valid Social Security Number (SSN) to:

  • Pay taxes (report their annual earnings to the IRS)
  • Open an interest-bearing bank account.


Can an ITIN be used for work purposes?
No. An ITIN cannot be used to show work authorization. The purpose of the ITIN is to assist individuals without a SSN to pay their taxes and/or open an interest-bearing bank account. Note: ITINs do not entitle the recipient to Social Security benefits or the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

Who needs an ITIN?

  • Individuals that earn income in the U.S. and must file a U.S. tax return but do not have a SSN. (According to U.S. law, unless your income is exceedingly low, you are legally required to file an income tax return.)
  • Spouses and dependents that are listed on a U.S. tax return but do not have a SSN. (Spouses and dependents must fill-out separate Forms W-7 and submit them together with the principal taxpayer.)
  • Individuals that would like to open an interest-bearing bank account but do not have a SSN.


Does the use of an ITIN indicate that the applicant is undocumented?
No. The ITIN is available to a range of foreign-born persons that are not eligible for SSNs. The IRS has stated repeatedly that an ITIN does not create an inference about an individual’s immigration status.

How does an individual apply for an ITIN?
Individuals must complete IRS Form W-7, “Application for IRS Individual Taxpayer
Identification Number.” This Form may be obtained from any IRS office, U.S. consular office aboard, or any Acceptance Agent. It also is available on-line at www.irs.gov, or by calling 1-800-TAX FORM. Form W-7 is available in both English and Spanish.

 

More information in the attachments below.

 

 

Resources by type: 

Increasing Refugee Civic Participation: Starting with the Schools

Sept. 23, 2008

This web-based CLINIC training for refugee service providers offers organizations tools for developing their own efforts to increase refugee parent involvement in the school system.  The training explores the benefits and challenges of engaging refugee parents in the school system, ways organizations can promote refugee parent involvement in the schools, different models and approaches to parent involvement, and where to start. 

 

This training is presented by Mosaica: The Center for Nonprofit Development and Pluralism and is offered through CLINIC's project, "Technical Assistance to Promote Refugee Citizenship & Civic Participation," which is funded by the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

To download the Power Point presentation, click here.

 

Resources by type: 

Immigrant-Led Organizers in Their Own Voices

The United States is experiencing historically unprecedented levels of immigration. As of March immigrantorganizersvoice2005, there were 37 million foreign-born persons in the United States, making up 12 percent of the population. Approximately 14 million immigrants arrived during the 1990s.2 From the early 1990s to 2000, the number of immigrants increased by 61 percent. Today, immigrants are changing the face of the cities in which they settle. Some have argued that immigration policies, including immigrant integration, are necessary to ensure our nation’s security and domestic harmony.3 While society as a whole should be responsible for addressing the integration needs of immigrant communities, in many cases immigrants themselves have taken the primary initiative to integrate into U.S. society. Many have chosen organizing as a powerful way of doing this.

 

To download the entire publication, please click here.