Responding to Changes in Immigration Policy | CLINIC

Responding to Changes in Immigration Policy

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The new administration is making significant changes to immigration policy. As changes are announced, CLINIC is analyzing them and preparing resources and training to keep affiliates informed. Here are some of our resources for you to use with your clients.

 

General Resources and Analysis

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services issued a memo on May 31, 2019 curtailing access to important asylum protections for many child asylum seekers. The memo goes into effect on June 30, 2019 and will be applied to any cases decided by USCIS on or after that date. It directs asylum officers to conduct an “independent factual inquiry” to determine whether an applicant was under 18 and unaccompanied at the time of filing the I-589 asylum application and thus entitled to certain asylum protections for unaccompanied children. This differs from the previous policy that directed asylum officers to accept a prior unaccompanied child determination made by the federal government, provided that determination had not been rescinded before the application was filed.

Page last updated: June 13, 2019

On May 3, CLINIC submitted a public comment opposing USCIS’ proposed changes to fee waivers, including elimination of the means-tested benefit criterion. In the comment, CLINIC describes how the proposed changes will add burden and inefficiency at all levels, including on individuals, legal service providers, and on USCIS itself.

Page last updated: May 22, 2019

The Executive Office for Immigration Review, or EOIR, published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, or ANPRM, on March 27, 2019. The ANPRM seeks public comments about the possibility of changing regulations to allow limited appearances by representatives in immigration court, and whether representatives should be able to help unrepresented immigrants prepare pro se motions and applications. Public comments on this ANPRM are due on April 26, 2019.

Page last updated: April 10, 2019

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for South Sudan will expire on May 2, 2019 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend and/or redesignate or terminate TPS for South Sudan by March 3, 2019.

Page last updated: February 7, 2019

The Department of Homeland Security, or DHS, released its new Migrant Protection Protocols, or Remain in Mexico Policy, on Jan. 24. The new policy sets out procedures to return asylum-seekers to Mexico to wait while their asylum case is pending in the U.S. immigration court system. There are still many unanswered questions about this effort to thwart asylum seekers, but this is what we know so far.

Page last updated: January 31, 2019

USCIS published a policy memo on July 5, 2018 expanding adjudicators’ discretion to deny an immigration application without first issuing a Request for Evidence or Notice of Intent to Deny when the evidence initially submitted fails to establish eligibility for the requested benefit. Read CLINIC’s FAQs on this new guidance here.

Page last updated: August 29, 2018

USCIS publicly released two memos on July 5, 2018 that update and change agency guidance to field officers on when they are to issue Form I-862, Notice to Appear, or NTA, and Referrals to ICE, or RTIs, to people who are considered “removable.”

Page last updated: July 9, 2018

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Somalia will expire on Sept. 17, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend and/or redesignate or terminate TPS for Somalia by July 19, 2018.

Page last updated: June 29, 2018

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for Yemen will expire on Sept. 3, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend and/or redesignate or terminate TPS for Yemen by July 5, 2018.

Page last updated: June 14, 2018

In the consolidated cases NAACP v. Trump and Trustees of Princeton University v. United States, a federal court judge has ruled against the Administration, holding that its rescission of DACA was arbitrary and capricious. However, the court stayed its order to vacate the administration’s rescission memo for 90 days to give the administration the opportunity to further explain the reasoning behind its rescission of DACA.

Page last updated: April 27, 2018
The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for approximately 9,000 Nepali TPS holders will expire on June 24, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS secretary must decide whether to extend, terminate or redesignate TPS for Nepal by April 25, 2018.
 
Page last updated: March 29, 2018

Do you have clients with Temporary Protected Status who reside in the jurisdiction of either the Sixth or Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals? These frequently asked questions explain how current USCIS policy permits individuals who entered the United States without inspection, but subsequently received TPS, adjust to lawful permanent resident status.  

Page last updated: November 15, 2017

A federal court judge has ruled against Texas in the landmark case, City of El Cenizo et al v. Texas regarding the state’s anti-immigrant law, commonly known as SB4.

Page last updated: September 8, 2017

This document can help undocumented individuals determine whether they might qualify for some sort of immigration relief and whether they are at high risk of being arrested by immigration.

Page last updated: March 28, 2018

Ten state attorneys general, parties to the Texas v. United States case, have threatened a legal challenge to the 2012 DACA program if the administration does not rescind it by Sept. 5, 2017.

Page last updated: August 29, 2017

Consolidated outreach flyer that includes links to CLINIC’s top resources on avoiding immigration services scams, Know Your Rights materials, and emergency planning for immigrant families at risk for deportation.

Page last updated: September 6, 2017
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The current 6-month grant of Temporary Protected Status, or TPS, for nearly 60,000 Hondurans will expire on July 5, 2018 unless extended by the secretary of Homeland Security. By statute, the DHS Secretary must decide whether to extend, terminate or redesignate TPS for Honduras by May 4, 2018.

Page last updated: February 15, 2018

The current 18-month grant of Temporary Protected Status for nearly 200,000 Salvadorans will expire on March 9, 2018 unless extended by the Department of Homeland Security Secretary. By statute, the DHS Secretary must decide whether conditions warrant extension of the deadline by Jan. 8, 2018.

Page last updated: June 13, 2018

Information on this topic is changing rapidly. Please see our latest update here: cliniclegal.org/resources/important-updates-trump-administration-travel-ban

 

Page last updated: June 30, 2017

The Supreme Court announced June 26, 2017, that it will hear arguments during its upcoming term on the “travel ban” litigation, and in the meantime, it will allow part of the President’s executive order temporarily banning the entry into the United States of nationals of six Muslim-majority nations (Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen) and refugees to go into effect.

Page last updated: June 27, 2017

Hateful, anti-immigrant rhetoric has become common place in the news cycle and in legislative bodies across our country. In order to combat the narrative, organizations serving immigrants must look for ways to safely amplify immigrant voices in their communities. This three-part guide will teach you how to combat anti-immigrant narratives through legislative testimony, local media work, and social media.

Page last updated: June 19, 2017

This guide provides an overview of the federal rulemaking process and information about how you can participate. Engaging in administrative advocacy ensures that we are using all avenues to fight for immigrants and will more effectively amplify our collective voice.

Page last updated: December 3, 2018

U.S. District Court Judge Derrick K. Watson of Hawaii on March 15, 2017, blocked enforcement of key provisions of President Trump’s revised executive order, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.” The order banned most people from six predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States.

Page last updated: March 17, 2017

This webinar covered some best practices in informing your client communities about exposure to enforcement, protection against enforcement, and potential eligibility for immigration benefits.  It addressed: current enforcement priorities (as of 3/13/17); what to cover in a Know Your Rights presentation and how to cover it; what materials to distribute; the potential integration of self-screening or onsite screening by legal providers; and safety planning information. 

Page last updated: June 18, 2018

NOTE: The travel ban provision of this executive order, and its provision suspending refugee admissions, have been blocked from taking effect under court orders in Hawaii and Maryland. Other court challenges remain pending. More information can be found here

 

Page last updated: March 22, 2017

On March 6, 2017 President Trump signed an Executive Order imposing a 90-day suspension of entry and visa issuance to people from Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia and Yemen. This new Executive Order goes into effect March 16, 2017. Key provisions of the order and DHS FAQs are described below.

Page last updated: March 22, 2017

The new administration’s Executive Orders and Department of Homeland Security memos on immigration enforcement have implications for all areas of immigration law practice. This collection of practice tips will be updated as needed to alert you to issues you should consider as you counsel and represent clients.

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Page last updated: March 27, 2017
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An FAQ on the recent increased border security and immigration enforcement executive order and DHS memo.

Page last updated: March 9, 2017

The “Unauthorized Practice of Immigration Law (UPIL): A State-by-State Overview of Legal Mechanisms to Combat these Deceptive Practice” resource is intended for immigration attorneys, recognized and accredited representative, and community-based organizations assisting noncitizen clients who have been victims of unauthorized practice of immigration law. 

Page last updated: July 6, 2017

The following is a simple summary of the main points of the enforcement guidance issued by the Department of Homeland Security Feb. 20 and DHS fact sheets of Feb. 21. More detailed legal analysis will follow.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

The following is a simple summary of the main points of the enforcement guidance issued by the Department of Homeland Security Feb. 20 and DHS fact sheets of Feb. 21. More detailed legal analysis will follow.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

This webinar included an analysis and discussion of the three executive orders issued on Jan. 25 and 27 and how they affect immigrants, refugees and the programs that serve them.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

A collection of frequently asked questions about the recent Executive Orders under the new administration.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

Use these flyers in your community to help people identify whether the Executive Orders affect them and what they need to know and do. Includes a customizable box to put the contact information of the nearest legal service provider.

Page last updated: March 10, 2017

In his first days in office, President Trump signed two executive orders affecting immigrants. This document provides talking points on how to address each of these in your communities.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

DACA is an executive action, implemented by President Obama in 2012, providing deportation relief and the opportunity to work for a select group of young, undocumented people living in the United States. This document provides some talking points.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

This resource can be provided to your clients. It answers questions such as, "What can you do to prepare?" and "What if you have DACA?".

This resource is also available in Spanish, a customizable English version, and a customizable Spanish version.

Page last updated: March 8, 2017

 

Outreach to the Administration

CLINIC joined 30 human rights organizations in calling on  Attorney General Barr and Acting Homeland Security Secretary McAleenan to refrain from adopting proposed regulations set forth in an April 2019 White House Memorandum.

Page last updated: June 7, 2019

CLINIC submitted a comment in response to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ changes to its Policy Manual at Vol. 1. (General Policies and Procedures).

Page last updated: May 24, 2019

CLINIC submitted a comment in response to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ proposed changes to Form N-336, Request for a Hearing  on a Decision for Naturalization. CLINIC’s comment focuses on the disparate impact the proposed changes may have on applicants with disabilities and requests that USCIS restore the sections of the form and instructions assisting applicants to understand how to apply for accommodations per USCIS policy and the Rehabilitation Act.

Page last updated: May 22, 2019

CLINIC submitted comments addressing a series of questions posed by the Executive Office for Immigration Review (immigration court) in response to the NWIRP v. Sessions litigation.

Page last updated: April 25, 2019

Despite public outcry and legal challenges, DHS has persisted in the expansion and implementation of its immoral, life-threatening practice of forcing certain asylum seekers to remain in Mexico while their case is processed. CLINIC renewed its February 2019 interfaith letter opposing this policy in response to requests by faith leaders and organizations and over 650 faith-based organizations and leaders signed on requesting the termination of the Remain in Mexico policy.

Page last updated: April 22, 2019

CLINIC submitted a comment in opposition to the proposed U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Tip Form, which would collect reports of alleged fraud from the general public without requiring submitters to identify themselves for proper vetting of their claims, or providing sufficient privacy protections for domestic violence or crime victims.

Page last updated: April 16, 2019

More than 215 national, state, and local organizations in the areas of immigration, civil rights, human rights, labor, faith, and education called on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to immediately designate Venezuela for Temporary Protected Status (TPS).

Page last updated: March 13, 2019

More than 500 faith leaders and organizations called on the Department of Homeland Security to end its policy of requiring some asylum seekers to wait in Mexico while their cases proceed.

Page last updated: April 1, 2019

CLINIC, with its partners, the American Immigration Council and the American Immigration Lawyers Association submitted a letter Feb. 6, 2019 to Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen urging her to rescind the Remain in Mexico policy immediately.

Page last updated: February 28, 2019

CLINIC submitted a comment in response to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services' policy guidance changing filing procedures and adjudications for the N-648 Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions. CLINIC requested that the revised policy guidance be withdrawn, as it would create undue burdens for disabled applicants, and would introduce suspicion of fraud based on factors that could easily be present in legitimate applications.

Page last updated: February 28, 2019

On Jan. 16, 2019, CLINIC submitted its comment to USCIS on proposed changes to the N-400 form and instructions. CLINIC’s comment focuses on ensuring that the naturalization process is accessible and efficient, reducing the burden on the applicant, practitioners and USCIS. In its comment, CLINIC drew particular attention to the redaction of language regarding accommodations for individuals with disabilities and/or impairments and urged USCIS to restore the prior language and information.

Page last updated: January 23, 2019

CLINIC and more than 40 immigration services and advocacy organizations call on USCIS to extend the comment period for changes to the USCIS Policy Manual regarding Sufficiency of Medical Certification for Disability Exceptions Filing.

Page last updated: May 24, 2019

CLINIC is among the more than 210,000 organizations and individuals that submitted comments in response to the Department of Homeland Security’s Notice of Public Rule Making (NPRM) entitled “Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds.” CLINIC opposes the NPRM, which would drastically change the definition and scope of the public charge ground of inadmissibility.

Page last updated: December 11, 2018

On November 27, 2018, CLINIC and other members of the Naturalization Working Group delivered a letter to Samantha Deshommes, Chief of USCIS’s Regulatory Coordination Division, opposing the proposal to change the Fee Waiver form and guidance to stop accepting receipt of a means-tested benefit as evidence of qualification for a fee waivers. The letter calls on USCIS to withdraw the proposed changes and maintain the current Fee Waiver form and guidance.

Page last updated: December 6, 2018

CLINIC joined more than 100 organizations in asking the Department of Health and Human Services to stop sharing information about juvenile immigrants’ sponsors with the Department of Homeland Security. The details are being used to deport sponsors, which the letter says violates the law and causes families to be too frightened to step forward to reconnect with their children.

Page last updated: February 21, 2019

CLINIC is among hundreds of organizations and individuals that submitted comments in response to the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services’ proposed revision entitled “Agency Information Collection Activities; Form I-912; Request for Individual Fee Waiver.”

Page last updated: December 10, 2018

On September 4, 2018, CLINIC and over 200 organizations that serve immigrant survivors of domestic violence and other crimes delivered a letter to USCIS Director L. Francis Cissna, expressing concern about an unannounced change in humanitarian fee waiver procedures resulting in a significant increase in denials. The letter calls on Director Cissna to reinstate USCIS’s prior fee waiver procedures and provide the public with clear information on new practices, among other requests.

Page last updated: February 27, 2019

Over 300 national, state, and local immigrant, religious, labor, and civil rights organizations sent a letter to Kristjen Nielsen, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, asking her to grant Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Guatemala in light of recent environmental disasters. TPS provides the ability to work and protection from deportation for foreign nationals who cannot be safely returned to their home countries due to extraordinary and temporary conditions, such as an environmental disaster.

Page last updated: July 24, 2018

On July 11, 2018, CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by over 100 faith leaders and faith-based organizations from across traditions urging the administration to grant an 18-month extension and to redesignate TPS for Somalia, demanded by Somalia’s humanitarian crisis and ongoing violent conflict.

Page last updated: November 28, 2018

On June 20, 2018, CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by over 650 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions urging the administration to grant an 18 month extension and to redesignate TPS for Yemen, demanded by Yemen’s ongoing war and catastrophic humanitarian crisis.

Page last updated: June 21, 2018

CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by 640 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions calling on the administration to extend and redesignate TPS for Honduras for at least another 18 months.

Page last updated: May 3, 2018

CLINIC and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by 275 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions calling on the administration to extend Temporary Protected Status for Nepal for at least another 18 months.

Page last updated: April 2, 2018

USCCB, Catholic Charities USA and CLINIC have joined as Amici Curiae, or friends of the court, in the Donald J. Trump, et al. v. State of Hawaii, et al. case challenging the constitutionality of Presidential Proclamation No. 9645. This case is commonly referred to as the “travel ban” litigation. The brief asks the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down the Executive Action as a violation of the Free Exercise Clause of the First Amendment. The case is scheduled to be heard in the Supreme Court on April 25.

Page last updated: April 30, 2018

Today’s announcement by the administration that it will terminate Deferred Enforced Departure, or DED, for Liberia sends thousands of people back to a country that is still recovering from civil war and the 2014 Ebola crisis.

Page last updated: March 28, 2018

Over 600 faith leaders and organizations from across traditions delivered a letter to the White House on March 22, 2018 urging the president to extend Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) for Liberia for at least another 18 months.

Page last updated: April 30, 2018

The Trump administration’s decision to end Temporary Protected Status for 2,500 Nicaraguans in 12 months “is a cruel and ultimately short-sighted action that—in addition to disrupting the lives of thousands of families that help make the United States vibrant—will harm the country and the region,” said Jeanne Atkinson, executive director of the Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.

Page last updated: March 28, 2018

On Oct. 27, CLINIC joined 120 other faith, non-profit, academic and other organizations from across the country in a letter urging DHS to reconsider the recent termination of Temporary Protected Status for Sudan.

Page last updated: November 3, 2017

The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc. and Church World Service delivered a letter signed by nearly 700 American faith leaders and organizations calling on the administration to continue to use Temporary Protected Status as Congress intended.

Page last updated: September 20, 2017

USCCB, Catholic Charities USA and CLINIC have joined as Amici Curiae, or friends of the court, in the International Refugee Assistance Project, et al. v. Trump case challenging the constitutionality of Executive Order No. 13780. 

Page last updated: April 30, 2018

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc., Catholic Charities USA and the USCCB’s Migration and Refugee Services joined to urge DHS Acting Secretary Elaine Duke to extend the Oct. 5, 2017 deadline set by the administration for certain renewals.

Page last updated: September 15, 2017

Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc., Catholic Charities USA and the USCCB’s Committee on Migration joined to urge the president to continue DACA, a policy protecting nearly 800,000 young people. The letter was sent amid reports that the administration may soon end the policy that provides protection from deportation and work authorization to young people who were brought to the U.S. as children.

Page last updated: August 30, 2017

Maintain detention system standards, letter urges CLINIC joined more than 250 organizations in urging Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly to abandon plans to expand immigration detention. The organizations also called on Kelly to strengthen rather than loosen standards and monitoring of the detention system that endangers the lives and due process rights of asylum seekers and immigrants.

Page last updated: May 9, 2017

Along with other Catholic partners, CLINIC April 17 called on DHS Secretary Kelly to extend the designation for Haiti for Temporary Protected Status for 18 months.

Page last updated: April 30, 2018

The new administration is making significant changes to immigration policy. As changes are announced, CLINIC is analyzing them and preparing resources and training to keep affiliates informed. Here are some of our resources for you to use with your clients.

Page last updated: January 18, 2019

 

Know Your Rights Resources

In addition to the resources above, we also have a collection of Know Your Rights documents.

This webinar covered some best practices in informing your client communities about exposure to enforcement, protection against enforcement, and potential eligibility for immigration benefits.  It addressed: current enforcement priorities (as of 3/13/17); what to cover in a Know Your Rights presentation and how to cover it; what materials to distribute; the potential integration of self-screening or onsite screening by legal providers; and safety planning information. 

Page last updated: June 18, 2018
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This flyer can be customized and used to advertise a meeting where immigrants can come to get qualified legal help and understand their rights.

Page last updated: June 19, 2018
Know Your Rights Card

A collection of cards for you to print out outlining some of the information that can be found in our Know Your Rights guide.

Page last updated: October 12, 2017
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YOU HAVE RIGHTS regardless of your immigration status. You may be at risk of being deported if you are undocumented, if you are a non-citizen with a criminal history, if you are on parole or have a prior deportation order. To protect yourself, your family and your community you must KNOW YOUR RIGHTS. Knowledge is power. Act NOW. Do not wait. Be prepared. This guide will help you.

Page last updated: October 12, 2017
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This information sheet is for immigrant workers. “Know Your Rights: A Guide to Workplace Rights for Immigrants” provides information about workers' rights while on the job.

Page last updated: March 23, 2017
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This information sheet is for public school students and parents. “Know Your Rights: A Resource for Students, Parents and Guardians” provides information about students’ rights to public education and safety at school; parent and guardian rights; how to report incidents of harassment and resources on filing complaints.

Page last updated: March 23, 2017

 

Defending Vulnerable Populations Project

The project’s primary objective is to increase the number of fully accredited representatives and attorneys who are qualified to represent immigrants in immigration court proceedings.To accomplish this, the Defending Vulnerable Populations Project will conduct court skills training for both nonprofit agency staff (accredited representatives and attorneys) and pro bono attorneys; develop practice materials to assist legal representatives; advocate against retrogressive policy changes; and expand public awareness on issues faced by vulnerable immigrants. Below are a collection of resources that can also be found on the project's page.

In the eyes of many, the zero tolerance policy and the family separation crisis came and went as one of the darkest times in U.S. policy toward families, children and asylum seekers. The latest news reviving the issue, particularly Judge Sabraw’s decision to expand the class in Ms. L v. ICE to include thousands beyond the 2,800 separations previously acknowledged, reminds us that our work to bring justice to these families is far from over. CLINIC, along with partners and affiliates, has built a multi-faceted response to the family separation crisis that supports hundreds of families and stands to help thousands.

Page last updated: April 2, 2019

After two years as a project within Training, Litigation and Support, Defending Vulnerable Populations on March 1 became a separate department within CLINIC. Though it comes as an acknowledgment of the importance of the work DVP has developed, the change primarily affects administrative functions within CLINIC.

Page last updated: May 8, 2019

Formerly separated families continue to face difficulties. These difficulties include navigating removal proceedings in immigration court without legal counsel. In absentia removal orders are a likely consequence of navigating removal proceedings pro se, especially given the trauma these families endured. The Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.

Page last updated: March 14, 2019

Gibson, Dunn, and Crutcher, LLP, represented CLINIC on an amicus brief in support of the plaintiffs-appellees in Inland Empire – Immigrant Youth Collective, et al., v. Kirstjen Nielsen, et al. The plaintiffs-appellees challenge the government’s unlawful termination of their DACA without process on behalf of a class of DACA recipients.

Page last updated: January 17, 2019

On August 16, 2018, Attorney General Jefferson Sessions issued Matter of L-A-B-R-, 27 I&N Dec. 405 (A.G. 2018), a precedent decision about how immigration judges (IJs) should decide certain motions for a continuance “to await the resolution of a collateral matter.” The decision uses the term “collateral matter” to refer to filings with U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) and other matters pursued outside of immigration court that could affect the outcome of the removal proceedings. Many noncitizens in removal proceedings are eligible for immigration relief that is adjudicated by USCIS, and that, if granted, would provide them with lawful status and a basis for terminating the removal proceedings.

Page last updated: September 26, 2018

This fact sheet explains how the Trump Administration carried out family separation and the recent federal court ruling in Ms. L v. ICE

Page last updated: August 9, 2018

This practice advisory by CLINIC and the American Immigration Council provides practitioners with strategies and considerations based on the U.S. Supreme Court case of Pereira v. Sessions.

Page last updated: December 21, 2018

This practice pointer provides a summary and analysis of USCIS's June 28, 2018 policy memo which expands the situations in which USCIS will issue a Notice to Appear in connection with adjudicating a request for immigration benefits.

Page last updated: December 19, 2018

This index provides a catalogue of unpublished decisions by the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services (USCIS) Administrative Appeals Office (AAO) reviewing decisions on petitions for Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS). The authors reviewed the decisions available on the USCIS website, from 2005 to March 2019. The goal of this index is to assist practitioners who represent children and youth seeking SIJS.

Page last updated: May 24, 2019

Sample Respondent’s Brief Regarding Particular Social Group Formulation Requirements Under Matter of W-Y-C- & H-O-B-

Page last updated: June 6, 2018

This practice pointer provides practitioners guidance on the Attorney General’s Matter of Castro-Tum decision issued on May 17, 2018. Matter of Castro-Tum revokes immigration judges’ and the Board of Immigration Appeals’ (BIA) general authority to administratively close cases, or temporarily close cases without deciding them, with some exceptions.

 

Page last updated: June 27, 2018

This guide provides strategies for practitioners seeking a client’s release from immigration detention. It focuses on the nuts and bolts of preparing for and representing a client during immigration court bond hearings.

Page last updated: May 9, 2019

This report highlights the high rate of unrepresented families with valid asylum claims, features clients’ stories, discusses the obstacles families face in attending their immigration court hearings, explains how the immigration system fails families seeking asylum, and provides policy recommendations for how the Trump Administration and Congress can address these shortcomings.

Page last updated: June 22, 2018

As more noncitizens are targeted for the initiation of removal proceedings under the Trump administration’s broadened enforcement priorities, immigration court dockets will likely become even more backlogged. Given these strains and the reality of human fallibility, there will continue to be instances in which practitioners observe inappropriate and problematic immigration judge conduct.

Page last updated: August 10, 2017

This practice advisory is designed for practitioners representing child clients in removal proceedings or advising family members of child clients in removal proceedings. As reports of ICE arresting parents and family members emerge, the goal of this advisory is to provide guidance and suggestions to practitioners on best practices for mitigating the risk of civil immigration enforcement or criminal prosecution of family members of children in removal proceedings.

Page last updated: July 20, 2017

CLINIC, along with allies, filed a request for a hearing with the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights arguing that DOJ EOIR violates the human rights of asylum seekers because certain immigration courts within the U.S. system have virtually denied all asylum claims before them. 

Page last updated: July 5, 2017

President Trump’s Jan. 27, 2017 executive order, known as the travel ban, has been challenged several times in districts across the country. Here are the newest updates.

Page last updated: June 18, 2018

SILVER SPRING, Maryland - A new program under CLINIC’s Defending Vulnerable Populations Project will provide immigration legal advice and representation to people from countries covered by the Trump administration’s travel ban.

Page last updated: June 19, 2018

This project assists immigrants from the countries targeted by Trump administration executive orders. We provide legal support and advice on immigration matters, primarily to residents of Montgomery County, Maryland, who are experiencing delays or other problems with immigration cases.

Page last updated: April 10, 2019

Como el Servicio de Inmigración y Aduanas (ICE, por su sigla inglés) del Departamento de Seguridad Interna (DHS, por su sigla inglés) sigue a hacer cumplir las leyes de inmigración y un creciente número de inmigrantes están sujetos a detención, los defensores no solo tienen que representar a sus clientes en procedimientos de fianza, pero también tienen que asistirlos a recuperar la fianza. Also available in English.

Page last updated: August 27, 2018

In a three-page April 11, 2017, memorandum, Attorney General Jeff Sessions called for increased criminal prosecution of noncitizens. Living up to his pro-prosecution, anti-immigrant reputation, Sessions’ memo directs federal prosecutors to prioritize bringing criminal charges to “further reduce illegality.”

Page last updated: June 18, 2018

The Board of Immigration Appeals issued a precedent decision about administrative closure, on April 18, 2017. Administrative closure is a procedure that temporarily removes a case from an immigration judge’s active calendar. It is usually done due to the possibility of some event that is “relevant to immigration proceedings but is outside the control of the parties or the court and may not occur for a significant or undetermined period of time.”

Page last updated: June 18, 2018

This webinar covered some best practices in informing your client communities about exposure to enforcement, protection against enforcement, and potential eligibility for immigration benefits.  It addressed: current enforcement priorities (as of 3/13/17); what to cover in a Know Your Rights presentation and how to cover it; what materials to distribute; the potential integration of self-screening or onsite screening by legal providers; and safety planning information. 

Page last updated: June 18, 2018

Learn about what makes Maryland  unique when it comes to contingency planning. Those participating in this webinar will learn how to properly advise resident Maryland families who are facing potential family separation and what measures they should take to care for their children. It considers custody, guardianship, powers of attorney and kinship care affidavits. Ethical issues will also are discussed. Featured speakers are Maryland attorneys Van Doan, Jon Greene, and Michael Stelmack.

Page last updated: June 18, 2018

Since 2014, the Executive Office for Immigration Review docketing priorities have included unaccompanied minors and adults with children who were released at the border or from family detention.

Page last updated: March 10, 2017

The “Unauthorized Practice of Immigration Law (UPIL): A State-by-State Overview of Legal Mechanisms to Combat these Deceptive Practice” resource is intended for immigration attorneys, recognized and accredited representative, and community-based organizations assisting noncitizen clients who have been victims of unauthorized practice of immigration law. 

Page last updated: July 6, 2017

CLINIC has asked SIJ experts in MD and NY to draft affidavits describing in detail their respective state laws expanding state “juvenile” court jurisdiction from 18 to the age of 20. Advocates should use these affidavits in a creative manner including submission to USCIS in response to Requests for Further Evidence (RFE) or to Immigration Judge to request release from custody.

Page last updated: February 22, 2017

Are you expecting a friend or family member to arrive from one of the "travel ban" countries? Tell Airport Lawyer about their planned arrival. Airport Lawyer will share this information with teams of volunteer lawyers.

Page last updated: February 13, 2017

On Feb. 9, 2017, a unanimous three-judge panel of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals denied the federal government’s motion for a stay of an order enjoining implementation of the president’s Executive Order barring certain travel to the United States.

Page last updated: February 13, 2017

CLINIC continues to monitor and is considering advocacy and litigation strategies to assist refugees and nationals from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen affected by the “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States” Executive Order. If your organization is serving an affected individual, CLINIC asks that you share the following information to help inform our strategies:

Page last updated: March 7, 2017

This guide is intended to support pro bono attorneys, fully accredited Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA) Representatives, law students, and paralegals working to prevent the deportation of families who recently crossed the U.S.-Mexico border seeking asylum and have been ordered removed in absentia by an Immigration Judge (IJ). The Asylum Seeker Advocacy Project (ASAP) at the Urban Justice Center and Catholic Legal Immigration Network, Inc.

Page last updated: October 3, 2017

CLINIC and ASAP created guidance in Spanish for the Immigrant Justice Corps to distribute at the New York City Immigration Court to the Central American asylum-seeking mothers and children in deportation proceedings.

Download the guide.

Page last updated: March 24, 2017

How to get a client’s bond money back, once they’ve been released or deported is just one of the questions arising in the cases of families who have had their asylum merits cases scheduled on a fast track.

Page last updated: April 30, 2019