Public Benefits and Education

 

 

House Bill 1436 was passed by the House Judiciary Committee on February 19, 2014 and is currently on the House floor.  Sponsored by Rep. Mike Turner, this omnibus immigration bill would go into effect on January 1, 2015 and would do the following:

 

New York City Council Approves Municipal Identification Card Program

Back to State and Local Immigration Project Page

 

Florida Becomes 20th State to Offer In-State Tuition to Undocumented Students

This webinar is for current and aspiring immigrant advocates on a grassroots level. This webinar provides an overview of the role each level of government plays in regulating the lives and livelihoods of immigrants.

Philadelphia, Baltimore, and the Majority of Counties in Oregon Limit Local Police Involvement in Enforcing Immigration Laws

It is estimated that 65,000 undocumented students graduate from high school in the United States every year. These graduates face various financial barriers to pursuing a college education, including the fact that a social security number is required to qualify for federal financial aid.

By Jen Riddle

 

How many undocumented students could benefit from in-state tuition?

Supreme Court Leaves Lower Court Decisions on Anti-Immigrant Housing Regulations Intact

Offering in-state tuition rates to all residents benefits the state’s economy.

Welcoming the Stranger through Immigrant Integration discusses five state-level legislative initiatives that promote the integration of immigrants into our states and communities.  The integration measures discussed include legislation that creates tuition equity for all; strengthens human trafficking laws; invests in English language instruction; uses the budget process to integrate immigrants; and enhances access to financial aid and protection against immigration consultant fraud.

This webinar is for legal service providers, immigrant advocates, educators, faith leaders, employers, community organizers, and others helping DREAMers apply for DACA or navigate work, school, and life after receiving DACA. Have you had issues helping DACA applicants meet the education eligibility requirements, obtain juvenile records, or access scholarships or loans?

Last August, the Obama Administration began implementing its Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program – a policy through which certain undocumented individuals receive temporary permission to stay in the U.S. for two years as well as the right to apply for employment authorization. After some initial resistance to issuing driver’s licenses to DACA grantees, most states eventually decided to do so. At this time, only two states – Arizona and Nebraska – continue to deny state driver’s licenses or identification cards to DACA recipients.   

Legislators in New Hampshire have introduced HB 474 and an Amendment to HB 474 that extends in-state student status to individuals without lawful status.  As shown below, HB 474 standing alone is more generous than it would be with the Amendment.  That said, HB 474 still provides an avenue for students without lawful status to gain in-state student status in New Hampshire’s post-secondary education system.   

Overview of HB 474: