Online Resources/Helpful Links

Search by a particular word or phrase.
Search by a particular blog tag.

Immigration Legal Program Management Self Assessment Tool

Introduction

CLINIC has identified seven areas which, when developed fully, are strong indicators of a successful, charitable legal immigration program. CLINIC offers this self assessment tool to identify program strengths and weaknesses so that improvements can be targeted and purposefully undertaken.

 
Using the Self Assessment Tool

The Self Assessment Tool is a useful way to evaluate progress towards implementation. CLINIC recommends you use the Self Assessment section by section, identifying feasible priorities for necessary improvements. Please contact your Field Support Coordinator for resources and other support when focusing on these program management components.

 

Click Here to download CLINIC's Program Management Self Assessment Tool

Resources by type: 

Study Indicates that Significant Percentage of Unauthorized Immigrants May Be Eligible for Permanent Status

The Center for Migration Studies of New York (CMS) has released the results of a survey on unauthorized immigrants who were found to be potentially eligible for permanent immigration status during screening for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The study found that 14.3 percent of immigrants screened for DACA eligibility were potentially eligible for some other immigration benefit or relief.

Most common among the remedies were family-based petitions for legal permanent residency, 25 percent; U-Visas for crime victims, 23.9 percent; and, Special Immigrant Juvenile Status, 12.6 percent. Unlike DACA, these legal remedies could put them on path to lawful permanent residence and citizenship. According to the survey, people without status who sought legal assistance for reasons other than DACA applications were also potentially eligible for other forms of relief.

The Potential Eligibility for Relief Survey of Non-Profits or “PERSON” survey focused on organizations that provide legal services to immigrants, including many CLINIC affiliate agencies.  The findings highlight the importance of thorough legal screening of applicants for the DACA and recently announced Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) programs. Legal screening of unauthorized immigrants has the potential to put many on a path to citizenship.

The study, entitled, “Paths to Lawful Immigration Status: Results and Implications from the PERSON Survey,” is now available in the Journal on Migration and Human Security.

Resources by type: 

Assisting Clients in Complying with Tax Filing Requirements

Back to CLINIC's CIR Resource Page

 

Employed immigrants, regardless of status or documents used to acquire employment, are required to file taxes. Service providers working with the foreign-born can offer tax assistance preparation and support as their clients work to fulfill this federal requirement. Those without a Social Security Number can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to use when filing taxes. Please see the federal government’s resources on applying for and using the ITIN below.

Assisting immigrants in applying for and using an ITIN is a powerful way of encouraging a culture that promotes immigrant integration within your agency. Naturalization applicants are required to show good moral character, and demonstrating through their tax history that they have complied with federal and state tax filing requirements is a great way to meet this requirement.  Big changes to immigration legislation in the future will likely require applicants to prove good moral character and that they have been filing tax returns.  Encouraging potential applicants to file now will help them be ready when a bill passes. 

 

Resources from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Applying for and Using an ITIN:

 

In English:

2013 ITIN Updated Procedures Frequently Asked Questions

Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN)

 

In Spanish:

Número de Identificación Personal del Contribuyente (ITIN)

Información General sobre el ITIN

 

For more information and ideas on promoting immigrant integration within your community, please see CLINIC’s Building Welcoming Communities webpage. You may also contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org with any questions or comments.  For more information about preparing for legalization, contact Michelle Sardone, CLINIC’s Legalization Program Director, at msardone@cliniclegal.org

Resources by type: 

Assisting Clients in Complying with Tax Filing Requirements

Employed immigrants, regardless of status or documents used to acquire employment, are required to file taxes. Service providers working with the foreign-born can offer tax assistance preparation and support as their clients work to fulfill this federal requirement. Those without a Social Security Number can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to use when filing taxes. Please see the federal government’s resources on applying for and using the ITIN below.

 

Assisting immigrants in applying for and using an ITIN is a powerful way of encouraging a culture that promotes immigrant integration within your agency. Naturalization applicants are required to show good moral character, and demonstrating through their tax history that they have complied with federal and state tax filing requirements is a great way to meet this requirement.  Big changes to immigration legislation in the future will likely require applicants to prove good moral character and that they have been filing tax returns.  Encouraging potential applicants to file now will help them be ready when a bill passes. 

 

Resources from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Applying for and Using an ITIN:

 

In English:

 

2013 ITIN Updated Procedures Frequently Asked Questions

Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN)

 

In Spanish:

 

Número de Identificación Personal del Contribuyente (ITIN)

Información General sobre el ITIN

 

For more information and ideas on promoting immigrant integration within your community, please see CLINIC’s Building Welcoming Communities webpage. You may also contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org with any questions or comments.  For more information about preparing for legalization, contact Michelle Sardone, CLINIC’s Legalization Program Director, at msardone@cliniclegal.org

Resources by type: 

Assisting Clients in Complying with Tax Filing Requirements

Employed immigrants, regardless of status or documents used to acquire employment, are required to file taxes. Service providers working with the foreign-born can offer tax assistance preparation and support as their clients work to fulfill this federal requirement. Those without a Social Security Number can apply for an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) to use when filing taxes. Please see the federal government’s resources on applying for and using the ITIN below.

Assisting immigrants in applying for and using an ITIN is a powerful way of encouraging a culture that promotes immigrant integration within your agency. Naturalization applicants are required to show good moral character, and demonstrating through their tax history that they have complied with federal and state tax filing requirements is a great way to meet this requirement.  Big changes to immigration legislation in the future will likely require applicants to prove good moral character and that they have been filing tax returns.  Encouraging potential applicants to file now will help them be ready when a bill passes. 

 

Resources from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) on Applying for and Using an ITIN:

In English:

 

In Spanish:

 

For more information and ideas on promoting immigrant integration within your community, please see CLINIC’s Building Welcoming Communities webpage. You may also contact Leya Speasmaker at lspeasmaker@cliniclegal.org with any questions or comments.  For more information about preparing for legalization, contact Michelle Sardone, CLINIC’s Legalization Program Director, at msardone@cliniclegal.org

 

Resources by type: 

The Arizona SB 1070 Litigation (2012)

Issues: 
Resources by type: 
Programs: 

Preparation Checklist for Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR)

Back to CLINIC's CIR Resource Page

 

This initial checklist can be used to start preparing your program for CIR.  The action items are divided into categories of leadership, infrastructure, BIA recognition and accreditation, financial, community education, partnerships, and volunteers.  This resource will help your program organize and assign tasks as you get ready for CIR.

Resources by type: