Advocacy

By Bradley Jenkins*

On December 31, 2013, the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) released guidance to the nation’s immigration judges entitled “Phase I of Plan to Provide Enhanced Procedural Protection to Unrepresented Detained Respondents with Mental Disorders.”  This guidance is the latest chapter in EOIR’s ongoing effort to reform how the agency handles the cases of persons with mental disorders who are placed into removal proceedings.

By Allison Posner

 

On November 6, 2013, USCIS held a stakeholder engagement on its new 2D barcode technology.  The new technology is part of the agency’s Forms Improvement Initiative, intended to enhance the agency’s ability to conduct intake at the lockboxes quickly and accurately.

Today is the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. At CLINIC, we are ever mindful of the need to advocate for the protection of the most vulnerable immigrants. Those who are detained face significant barriers to asserting their legal claims to remain in the United States. People living with mental disabilities are doubly vulnerable and face an impossible task when the government seeks to expel them from the country. Indeed, disabled immigrants often merit humanitarian protection precisely because of their heightened vulnerability, but may be unable to articulate their need for protection to the authorities.

With the support of the Four Freedoms Fund, and in conjunction with other immigrant right organizations,[1] CLINIC is tracking trends in immigration enforcement abuse in order to form a litigation strategy.  To support this goal, CLINIC is asking affiliates to share information about cases that may be in need of litigation before state, local, and federal court systems. 

CLINIC supports the legislative advocacy efforts of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' Office of Migration and Refugee Services, including the priorities outlined below. 

 

1. Comprehensive Immigration Reform

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