Citizenship

Newly updated in 2015, CLINIC’s study guide for the U.S. citizenship test explains the naturalization testing requirements and contains 13 study units on U.S. history and civics with many colorful and historic photos and illustrations, as well as maps, diagrams, and timelines. It includes a glossary of vocabulary words and test review questions for each unit. There are also discussion questions for each unit, and additional, optional study questions to amplify the content. It is designed for both classroom use and for self-study.

This toolkit contains a variety of resources collected and produced through CLINIC’s citizenship projects. It is designed to assist agencies providing citizenship services and civic participation opportunities for the most vulnerable applicants.

The United States is a nation of immigrants united by a common creed and shared values. With 37 million foreign born residents, the United States’ strength and vitality depends on the contributions of its newest members. However, the integration of a population of this magnitude and diversity cannot be assumed. The pressing policy question becomes: what can be done to promote the integration of this record number of immigrants?

This webinar, held on 5/28/15, provides an overview of citizenship for children through acquisition, derivation, and naturalization. The presenters are Kristina Karpinski and Charles Wheeler.

The laws regarding acquisition and derivation of citizenship have changed frequently over the years, resulting in different requirements that must be satisfied in order for a U.S. citizen to pass citizenship on to children born abroad.

Do you know how to help your clients with disabilities to naturalize? Watch this free recorded webinar on the special provisions in the law for people with disabilities such as reasonable accommodations, disability waivers, and oath waivers. Topics covered include eligibility, the application process, and practice tips. We also provide case examples and answer some frequently asked questions. 

Happy, diverse people waving American flags

CLINIC has created a self directed e-learning course to help train new immigration legal staff and volunteers on completing Form N-400, Application for Naturalization. The course is interactive and incorporates text, images, audio, and video along with opportunities for the participant to check his or her progress in the course through quizzes and a final test. At the end of the course participants may complete a course evaluation. Participants who successfully complete the final test and then complete the course evaluation will receive a certificate of course completion.

Learn more about the revised G-28 form, review the Center for Immigrant Integration's updates for the month, and see who's newly accredited. We also highlight Catholic Charities of Central Texas in our affiliate profile.

Read about the announcement Obama gave about in-country processing for Central American children. Also, check out this month's question corner to see if you know the answer.

Topics include information on how to advocate locally on behalf of unaccompanied minors.

Topics include an update on the USCIS changes to a policy on medical examination reports and a network profile.

On February 4, 2014, USCIS released its long-awaited revision of the Form N-400 (Application for Naturalization). A draft of the new form was published in the Federal Register for comment on December 20, 2012 and again on March 20, 2013. CLINIC submitted comments on the draft together with the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) on February 15, 2013. The comments are posted on the CLINIC website at https://cliniclegal.org/resources/revisions-to-application-for-naturaliz....

Dear affiliates,

 

USCIS recently revised its form N-400, Application for Naturalization.  The agency will now only accept the newest version of Form N-400, dated 09/13/13.

 Join us for a free webinar on fee waivers for naturalization applications as we discuss the following topics.

The webinar will discuss changes in the format and content of the new N-400. Held on February 26, 2014.

Citizenship for Us is a comprehensive guide to the naturalization process that provides detailed information on citizenship eligibility, requirements, and benefits and a step-by-step explanation of the N-400 (Application for Naturalization).  The guide includes 13 study units on U.S. history and civics, historic photos, timelines, a sample naturalization interview, and a chapter on civic participation.  It is geared for immigrants, community leaders, ESL teachers, and other non-attorneys.

Recent Circuit Court Cases on Derivation and Acquisition

By Jennie Guilfoyle and Debbie Smith

Derivation of Citizenship

Derivative citizenship under former INA § 321(a) does not require LPR status prior to turning 18, as long as the individual was residing in the United States before age 18, the Second Circuit held on August 12, 2013.  Nwozuzu v. Holder (2d Cir. 2013)

Citizenship for Us is a comprehensive guide to the naturalization process that provides detailed information on citizenship eligibility, requirements, and benefits and a step-by-step explanation of the N-400 (Application for Naturalization).  The guide includes 13 study units on U.S. history and civics, historic photos, timelines, a sample naturalization interview, and a chapter on civic participation.  It is geared for immigrants, community leaders, ESL teachers, and other non-attorneys.

Hard copies are also available for $40.

CLINIC and  the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) have shared comments with  USCIS concerning proposed changes to N-400, Application for Naturalization, and accompanying instructions.

This morning the New York Times published a bi-partisan statement of principles outlining four goals of immigration reform.  CLINIC welcomes this bi-partisan leadership in keeping the conversation moving.  The principles include a path to citizenship and relief for agricultural workers and highly skilled graduates.  The Senators also outline plans for continued enforcement along the border as well as a strong employment verification system.  Read the whole statement here.

The purpose of the webinar is to educate charitable immigration legal staff on the unique differences of planning and implementing a large, "mega" group application workshop for naturalization and deferred action. Held on September 12, 2012.

The purpose of the webinar is to educate charitable immigration legal staff on the unique differences of planning and implementing a large, "mega" group application workshop for naturalization and deferred action.

Click here for the webinar slides.

Held on September 12, 2012.

The citizenship test, especially the English language requirement, often poses a major challenge for older applicants.  How can citizenship teachers and program administrators best meet the special needs of an older learner?  What are the best strategies for success?  Join us for this webinar about promising practices in instruction and program design for elders in your community.  We will also discuss suggestions for learning activities, cultural considerations, and strategies to address common health issues.  This webinar is based on CLINIC's handbook by the sam

Citizenship for Elders is a unique handbook for teachers and administrators on creating and managing a citizenship program for the older learner. This handbook brings together the observations and insights of teachers from across the country on older learners from a wide range of cultures.

This toolkit contains a variety of resources collected and produced through CLINIC’s citizenship projects.  It is designed to assist agencies providing citizenship services and civic participation opportunities for the most vulnerable applicants.

This webinar discusses workshop models and approaches; planning for a workshop; and stages of the workshop event. Held on November 17, 2011.

Held on September 12, 2011.  This webinar discusses several key strategies for helping vulnerable applicants overcome barriers in the naturalization process.  Topics include disability waivers, reasonable accommodations for applicants with disabilities, due consideration on the citizenship test, and fee waivers for low-income applicants.  The presenters are Laura Burdick, Naturalization Project Coordinator, CLINIC; Alla Shagalova, Associate Director, Immigration Services, Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society; and Amy Tenney, Immigration Legal Services Staff Attorney, World Relief. 

Citizenship test preparation and quality legal services go hand in hand in assisting an immigrant along the path to citizenship. A prospective bill for comprehensive immigration reform will most likely bring changes in legal and language requirements for citizenship. It is the job of all legal service providers and teaching professionals working with the foreign born to anticipate these requirements and prepare clients in advance. The Creating a Citizenship Program Preparation Toolkit will be helpful to anyone seeking ways to better serve the foreign born as they prepare to naturalize.

The translations listed here were completed by USCIS and community organizations throughout the country. For translations completed by community organizations, the organization's contact information is included on the translation.

Refugees and immigrants strongly desire U.S. citizenship. Yet, many of them, especially those who are elderly, disabled, low-income, low-literate, and limited English proficient, face serious challenges in the naturalization process. These challenges can impede their integration and their civic participation in U.S. society.

In 2000-2001, CLINIC published a series of reports on immigration issues based on numerous case studies. These are not current reports.

The reports identify, track, and examine the impact of our nation's laws and immigration policies on at-risk immigrants. They illustrate particularly compelling problems faced by immigrants, clear explanations of the law at the root of such problems, and other research.