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Justice for Immigrants

Lenten Reflection: Comprehensive Immigration Reform and Executive Action

Deuteronomy 10:19 So you too should love the resident alien, for that is what you were in the land of Egypt.

Ash Wednesday: Commit to Immigration Reform

Matthew 2:13-23 When they had departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Rise, take the child and his mother, flee to Egypt, and stay there until I tell you. Herod is going to search for the child to destroy him.” Joseph rose and took the child and his mother by night and departed for Egypt. He stayed there until the death of Herod, that what the Lord had said through the prophet might be fulfilled, “Out of Egypt I called my son.”

National Migration Week 2015: We Are One Family Under God

With the promise of the New Year comes National Migration Week 2015, celebrated by the Catholic Church January 4-10. The theme is “We Are One Family Under God,” and there is no better time to extend goodwill, so abundantly shared with loved ones during the holidays, to our migrant brothers and sisters in Christ. 

Pentecost: On Fire for Immigration Reform

The Feast of Pentecost is upon us! This is a time to celebrate the missionary outburst to share the evangelii gaudium, the joy of the Gospel, with all people. And, it is at this wondrous time that we join Catholics in prayerful action to repair our disjointed immigration system. Pentecost is an ancient feast marking the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the disciples:

“A Moment We Cannot Afford to Lose”

Taking their message to Capitol Hill on May 29th, bishops emboldened Catholics to seek justice for immigrants through support for comprehensive reform.  A mass, offered for the families of those separated by our broken immigration system, was concelebrated by six bishops at St. Peter Church in Washington, D.C.  The prayers of principal celebrant Archbishop Thomas Wenski were clear:  migration is a central narrative of our faith and nation’s history, and ensuring that laws evolve to uphold the dignity of migrants is a moral obligation.

An Easter Reflection

Revelation 7:9-10 After this I looked, and behold, a great multitude that no one could number, from every nation, from all tribes and peoples and languages, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in white robes, with palm branches in their hands, and crying out with a loud voice, “Salvation belongs to our God who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb!”  

The Impact of Bad Deportation Practices on Migrants

The evening “Angela,” a woman in her early thirties, arrived at the shelter for women and children in Nogales, Mexico she was desperate to reunite with her husband “Tino” with whom she had traveled North two weeks before.  The couple traversed the Sonora desert together and crossed the border successfully, but were picked up at a Border Patrol checkpoint in Arizona only days after entering the United States.  The pair was separated upon apprehension and that was the last Angela saw of her husband. Angela described her husband to other migrants and service providers.
Five year old migrant child from El Salvador entered the US by himself.  He drew this plane saying it reminded him of God because if he had God in his heart, God would be the plane to take him to his mother.

The Plight of Migrant Children

By Luis  Enrique Jacquez, El Paso, Texas

Luisa’s Story

After crossing the length of Mexico over ground to get to the border, “Luisa,” a 36 year old widow from the indigenous municipality of Tamazulápam de Espíritu Santo in the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca, and her 20 year old son “Pedro” attempted to cross into the United States by walking through the harsh and unpopulated desert near Nogales, Arizona. Unlike most unauthorized migrants who attempt to cross the U.S. – Mexico border, Luisa and Pedro did not contract the service of a guide.

Widian's Story

Raised in a tiny village in Galilee, my father, the eldest of 5 children, was raised by loving parents who made a meager living as poor farmers. My mother, who was raised in an orphanage from a young age by a community of Sisters in Jerusalem, married my father at seventeen. During my childhood, my father worked as a mechanic and my mother as a teacher. While our home was filled with love, my parents recognized that their children would have better opportunities for education, advancement, and success in the U.S.