Articles by CLINIC | Page 11 | CLINIC

Articles by CLINIC

This category includes articles written by CLINIC staff.

Serving Immigrant Children in Texas

By Tatyana Delgado

With over 6,000 unaccompanied children released from juvenile detention facilities to sponsors in Texas from January through August 2014, many legal service providers have shifted into high gear.  Over 3,000 unaccompanied children have been released to parents, relatives, or other caretakers living in Harris County, Texas, which includes Houston. 

EOIR Releases Guidance on Expedited Court Procedures in Unaccompanied Children's Cases

By Sarah Bronstein

On September 10, 2014 Chief Immigration Judge Brian M. O’Leary issued a memorandum to all Immigration Judges entitled “Docketing Practices Relating to Unaccompanied Children’s Cases in Light of the New Priorities” (hereafter EOIR Docketing Memo).  This memorandum was issued in response to concerns raised by CLINIC and other agencies working on unaccompanied children’s issues at a meeting with the Executive Office for Immigration Review (EOIR) on August 18, 2014. 

Obama Announces In-Country Refugee Processing for Central American Children

By Ilissa Mira

On September 30, 2014, President Obama announced a plan to allow certain children from Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador to apply for refugee status within their own countries.  In fiscal year (FY) 2014, over 68,500 unaccompanied children fled violence in Central America, undertaking a long and dangerous journey to the United States.  As a response, in-country processing is aimed at stemming the surge of unaccompanied children by offering a safer alternative to traveling north alone.     

Cambia tu Vida, New York

Immigration is personal; it impacts all of us. That message resonated throughout the Cambia tu Vida launch. In immigration there is no “us” and “them.” As many speakers expressed: we are all in this together, we are here to help, and we are part of this community.

Celebrating U.S. Citizenship

As we celebrate our country’s birthday and independence on the Fourth of July, many of us will contemplate what it means to be Americans. Being an American for the foreign-born goes beyond the ability to vote in elections or obtain a U.S. passport. Many immigrants already feel American at heart long before they take their first step to becoming naturalized U.S. citizens – a pre-requisite to vote and obtain a passport. Many of them have integrated into their communities long before – going to weekly church services, volunteering in their children’s schools, and paying their taxes.

Catholic Charities of Indianapolis Expands its Welcome to New Americans

The Midwest has a history as a gateway for immigrants even if not as heralded as port cities in the east and west. Think of Chicago with its diverse ethnic population as early as the late 1800’s, especially among Eastern Europeans, that continues today with the largest Bosnian refugee population in the country. Think also of Detroit, Motor City, at the turn of the last century when Ford Motor Company attracted immigrant workers from Southern Europe and the Middle East to build the earliest automobiles. Detroit now has the largest Middle Eastern population in the United States, most recently welcoming tens of thousands of Iraqi refugees.

A Radical Experience: Archdiocese of New York Creates a “One-Stop-Shop” for Immigrant Integration

Since its inception two hundred years ago, the story of the Archdiocese of New York is an immigrant story – a tradition which continues today. For more than 30 years, the Archdiocese of New York has provided services to the foreign-born, including refugee resettlement and immigration legal services, through Catholic Charities Community Services (CCCS). As the immigrant and refugee population in the area has grown and changed, so has CCCS.

Celebrating Citizenship

Each year on September 17, we come together as a nation of immigrants to celebrate Citizenship Day. This is an opportunity to reflect on the meaning of being a U.S. citizen and recognize the many lawful permanent residents (LPRs) in our communities who are on their journey to becoming U.S. citizens.